Accra's 5 essential sights

Visitor attractions you must see in Ghana's capital

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  • Jamestown and Lighthouse

    Water is still the master of the port-hugging Jamestown neighbourhood in the south of the city. It is the oldest area in Accra and the former hub for a succession of colonial governments from the Portuguese in the 15th century until it became the capital of the British Gold Coast in 1877. Their colonial-style handiwork can be seen throughout this area. Today Jamestown is a lively but ramshackle area. Wooden and corrugated huts hem in a maze of roads and paths full of people selling food, clothes and services. Goats are given a free reign and every patch of waste ground is filled with children kicking a football around. Within Jamestown is the shanty of Bokum, home to more than 20 boxing clubs and where superstar Azumah Nelson crafted his trade. It is undoubtedly one of Accra’s most atmospheric regions, and despite the poverty it is largely safe and very friendly.

    Jamestown and Lighthouse
  • Arts Centre

    Although described as an Arts Centre, this is in fact a sprawling market selling all manner of crafts, textiles, musical instruments, antiques and pretty much anything else you can imagine. It’s an intense experience at first, but once you battle your way to the back you can have a more relaxing time to browse.

    Arts Centre
  • Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park

    See how national heroes are built at the mausoleum of Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana’s first president and one of its founding fathers. Across the five acres of land are a museum, statues, manicured gardens and, of course, the mausoleum itself.

    Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park
  • National Museum

    Despite being a little tired around the edges, the content of the National Museum is impressive. It’s a good idea to hit this place first to provide some context to the remarkable, and often brutal, history that has made Ghana the Black Star of Africa today.

    National Museum
  • WEB Du Bois Centre

    William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was an African-American civil rights activist who became a citizen of Ghana in the 1960s. He was known as the ‘Father of Pan-Africanism’. The centre, where he and his wife lived, and where they are now buried, houses the personal library of WEB Du Bois, a museum, the couple’s mausoleum, a seminar room, restaurant, gallery, amphitheatre and a research centre for Pan-African history and culture. There are also some personal effects.

    WEB Du Bois Centre

Jamestown and Lighthouse

Water is still the master of the port-hugging Jamestown neighbourhood in the south of the city. It is the oldest area in Accra and the former hub for a succession of colonial governments from the Portuguese in the 15th century until it became the capital of the British Gold Coast in 1877. Their colonial-style handiwork can be seen throughout this area. Today Jamestown is a lively but ramshackle area. Wooden and corrugated huts hem in a maze of roads and paths full of people selling food, clothes and services. Goats are given a free reign and every patch of waste ground is filled with children kicking a football around. Within Jamestown is the shanty of Bokum, home to more than 20 boxing clubs and where superstar Azumah Nelson crafted his trade. It is undoubtedly one of Accra’s most atmospheric regions, and despite the poverty it is largely safe and very friendly.

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