The 50 most-deserving Oscar winners of all time

Movies, actors, directors, soundtracks: one list to rule them all.

0

Comments

Add +
  • Oscar winners: Sabrina, Best Costumes, 1955

  • Oscar winners: Chariots of Fire, Best Original Score, 1982

  • Oscar winners: Bram Stoker's Dracula, Best Costume Design, 1993

  • Oscar winners: "Flowers and Trees," Best Animated Short Film, 1932

  • Oscar winners: Humphrey Bogart, Best Actor, 1952, The African Queen

  • Oscar winners: Linda Hunt, Best Supporting Actress, 1984, The Year of Living Dangerously

  • Oscar winners: "Lose Yourself," Best Song, 2003, 8 Mile

  • Oscar winners: The French Connection, Best Editing, 1972

  • Oscar winners: Days of Heaven, Best Cinematography, 1979

  • Oscar winners: Alien, Best Visual Effects, 1980

Oscar winners: Sabrina, Best Costumes, 1955

40
Oscar winners: Sabrina, Best Costumes, 1955

Sabrina, Best Costumes, 1955

Sometimes the bond between performer and designer is so intimate, it becomes a signature in itself. So it went with Audrey Hepburn and Hubert de Givenchy, whose playful outfits became the star's wardrobe onscreen and off for decades. Hollywood's Edith Head collected this Oscar in name only.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

39
Oscar winners: Chariots of Fire, Best Original Score, 1982

Chariots of Fire, Best Original Score, 1982

If you felt exhilarated by those Olympic hopefuls running on the beach, that's because of Vangelis's pulsing electronic music, an audacious choice for a period piece. The Greek composer's stirring main theme still triggers recognition in sports reels and parodies; his synths modernized the field.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

38
Oscar winners: Bram Stoker's Dracula, Best Costume Design, 1993

Bram Stoker's Dracula, Best Costume Design, 1993

Clothes make the man (and the monster): The exotic capes and headpieces that Eiko Ishioka designed for Francis Ford Coppola's operatic horror film were a singular achievement, so eye-catching that you couldn't help but be dazzled and seduced.—Keith Uhlich

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

37
Oscar winners: "Flowers and Trees," Best Animated Short Film, 1932

"Flowers and Trees," Best Animated Short Film, 1932

This Walt Disney short about a magical forest come to life was the first commercially released entertainment produced in three-strip Technicolor (it was also the first Oscar-winning cartoon), and it's an imaginative beauty. Uncle Walt's exclusive contract with the lab meant that other animators were forced to work with inferior processes for years.—Keith Uhlich

36
Oscar winners: Humphrey Bogart, Best Actor, 1952, The African Queen

Humphrey Bogart, Best Actor, 1952, The African Queen

Charlie Allnut is one of Bogart's defining roles: an aging, gin-swilling riverboat captain (a precursor to world-weary old men like Unforgiven's William Munny) and a crusty recluse trying to avoid the world. Ultimately, he's forced to deal with it.—Keith Uhlich

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

35
Oscar winners: Linda Hunt, Best Supporting Actress, 1984, The Year of Living Dangerously

Linda Hunt, Best Supporting Actress, 1984, The Year of Living Dangerously

And Russell Crowe thought Gladiator was hard. Try performing across genders (and, let's not forget, races). The character of Billy Kwan is Chinese; he's also Australian and a dwarf. Hunt, a New Jersey--born stage actress, did a total transformation and tore eyeballs away from the then-sizzling Mel Gibson.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

34
Oscar winners: "Lose Yourself," Best Song, 2003, 8 Mile

"Lose Yourself," Best Song, 2003, 8 Mile

Eminem was so convinced that his best-selling rap anthem wouldn't win, he didn't even show up to the ceremony (a rumor persists that he was sleeping). Still, who could blame him? A hip-hop track had never even been nominated before, much less been victorious. Chalk it up to an increasingly youthful Academy with excellent taste.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

33
Oscar winners: The French Connection, Best Editing, 1972

The French Connection, Best Editing, 1972

Oscar has a huge crush on car chases—Bullitt (1968) netted a golden statuette for some scary San Francisco speeding. But Gerald B. Greenberg seriously upped the ante with his cutting of this gritty police drama, one that shapes skittish rhythms and anxieties out of pure craft. A genius achievement.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

32
Oscar winners: Days of Heaven, Best Cinematography, 1979

Days of Heaven, Best Cinematography, 1979

At a certain time of evening, the light turns pink and hazy; It's called the magic hour, but Cuban cinematographer Nstor Almendros knew it lasted for only half that long. Working with director Terrence Malick (and second shooter Haskell Wexler), Almendros's pace was slow, but the results were heartrending.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video

31
Oscar winners: Alien, Best Visual Effects, 1980

Alien, Best Visual Effects, 1980

It's the most sickening moment in all of cinema: a Freudian reversal in which a male astronaut (the courageous John Hurt) finds himself splayed across a table giving violent, bloody birth to a different species. Out of his chest burst a franchise, for which we can tip our hats to futuristic Swiss sculptor H.R. Giger.—Joshua Rothkopf

 Watch now on iTunes    Watch now at Amazon Instant Video


You might also like

The best and worst Woody Allen movies

We rank the comedian-director’s 43 features

The highs and lows of Jason Statham

We chart the hits and many misses of the accent-mangling Cockney action man

The 15 most epic surf movies

We count down the best, most gnar-shredding surf films of all time

The best movies to see this month

These films are topping our must list this month

See more in Film

Users say

0 comments