5 things to know about Tête Charcuterie

The new West Loop spot focuses on European sausages, pates and cured meats

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  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Charcuterie board at TÊTE Charcuterie.

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Rillette of duck confit TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Rillette of duck confit TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Two-tree days at TÊTE Charcuterie.

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Mortadella at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Pickles at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    West loop salumi coppa at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Fromage de tete at TÊTE Charcuterie.

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Mustard at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Rosette de lyon at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Pate de campagne at TÊTE Charcuterie.

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Tete a tete at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Veal sweetbreads at TÊTE Charcuterie.

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    Germany sausage at TÊTE Charcuterie

  • Photograph: Martha Williams

    TÊTE Charcuterie

Photograph: Martha Williams

Charcuterie board at TÊTE Charcuterie.


Thomas Rice and Kurt Guzowski's Tête Charcuterie (1114 W Randolph St), which focuses on pates, sausages and cured meats, is now (soft) open—the official opening day is April 7. Here are five things to know about the new West Loop restaurant.

The charcuterie has a European sensibility.
The pair traveled to France and Germany and visited different charcuterie spots and butchers to explore the diversity of meats available. Upon their return, they translated that into dishes like French boudin blanc and German rostbratwurst. The menu also includes longanisa, a Filipino sausage, cured meats from West Loop Salumi (and from Tête itself, soon), pates and terrines, and dishes like pickled beef cheek salad, pork belly rillons and veal sweetbreads.

But the ingredients are local.
Rice and Guzowski source ingredients from around the Midwest and learned the science behind all the recipes in a meat-processing class at Iowa State University.

The space is really cool.
Located in an old meatpacking facility, the space, which seats up to 65, includes steel beams, brick walls and a charcuterie bar, with all the daily meats on display. A patio will open in warmer months.

Eventually, you can buy meat to take home.
Right now, all the charcuterie that's made stays in the restaurant, but eventually they'll expand into retail.

Vegetarians won't be left out.
"There will always be vegetable dishes," the pair tells us, and the opening menu includes a winter beet salad and cocotte of spring vegetables.

Tête Charcuterie is currently open for dinner service Monday–Thursday from 5–10pm and Friday–Saturday from 5–11pm. It's closed on Sundays.


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