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Chicken wings done three ways

What local chefs are doing with chicken wings


Michael Taus started making Korean-style chicken wings as part of the comida at Zealous. But now he�s serving them to the public at his new place, Duchamp. The East-meets-West wings are deep-fried, then drenched in the uniquely Korean combination of honey, sugar and chiles. Then, for the Western part of the dish, they�re served with an �American-style� slaw of cabbage, soy mayonnaise and hearts of palm. It�s not so pretty to eat the stuff, but Taus assures us that �they�re well worth the mess.� (2118 N Damen Ave at Charleston St, 773-235-6434).


Graham Elliot Bowles (or at least somebody from his staff) regularly has to make runs to 7-Eleven to grab a bunch of Budweiser-otherwise, the buffalo chicken wings at graham elliot wouldn�t be topped with the proper foam. Bowles says that he could, in theory, top the sous-vide�d-then-fried chicken thighs with a foam made with a fancier beer. But that, he says, would �push it in a more hoity-toity direction.� Which would be missing the point completely. (217 W Huron St between Wells and Franklin Sts, 312-624-9975).


What�s up with chicken wings showing up on fine-dining menus all over town? To hear Perennial chef Ryan Poli talk about it, it�s a combination of three things: They�re cheap, they�re shareable and they�re instantly familiar. Personally, Poli�s thoughts about wings always begin with memories of beloved bar wings (he has a penchant for those from BW3), which he then turns �into something more refined�-much like their current incarnation, glazed with a soy-orange reduction and served on a bed of spicy Asian slaw. (1800 N Lincoln Ave at Clark St, 312-981-7070).