Antique shopping in Roscoe Village

It may no longer be Antique Row, but this strip still draws collectors with its old-school furnishings and oddball trinkets.

1/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
2/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
3/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
4/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
5/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
6/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
7/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
8/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
9/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
10/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
11/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
12/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
13/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
14/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
15/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
16/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
17/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
18/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
19/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
20/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
21/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
22/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
23/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
24/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
25/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
26/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
27/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
28/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
29/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
30/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett
31/31
Photograph: Erica Gannett

Good Old Days
“There used to be about 20 [antique] stores on this street,” owner Bruce Bailey says. “But now, it’s just a handful. Business is better for us on the Internet.” Sure, you could score a colorful Chicago bungalow–style stained-glass window ($400) from one of Good Old Days’ online outlets (such as stores.ebay.com/the-good-old-days-antiques-chicago), but then you wouldn’t get to sift through the packed three-story shop. And you couldn’t check out the handwritten notes attached to some of the merch, like the Philco Phono 2 radio ($275) that, as the sign says, BING CROSBY ADVERTISED IN 1946. In the junk shop–like basement, you’ll find old neon beer signs, mugs and sleeveless records by the likes of Frankie Valli and Elton John. Head upstairs for old photographs of celebs (Annette Funicello, Marilyn Monroe) and baseball players ($25–$48)—while photos of African-American stars such as Ella Fitzgerald and Ray Charles are inexplicably grouped together in the back. 2138 W Belmont Ave (773-472-8837).

Night and Day Vintage
This cluttered (yet organized) shop is open only from 3–7pm Wednesday through Sunday, and sometimes it doesn’t unlock the doors on time. But once you get in, you’re treated to an array of old-school goodies (circa 1920s–1960s), including a large circa-1950s daybed with a teak wood frame ($575) and a 1950s maroon Hugh Hefner–esque smoking jacket ($78). When it comes to clothing, there’s a bigger emphasis on items from the 1950s and ’60s, including beaded cardigans ($20 and up), cocktail dresses (around $30–$50) and skirted swimsuits ($25–$50). 2228 W Belmont Ave (773-327-4045).

Father Time Antiques
When you walk into this storefront, you’ll immediately notice the sound of about 100 ticktocks nearly drowned out by the oldies playing on the sound system. Just as the name suggests, Father Time is all about vintage clocks and watches. In addition to watch repair and its stock of restored timepieces (circa-1963 Omega automatic wristwatch for $1,895; Cromwell watch from the 1930s for $695), the shop also sells jewelry, knickknacks and other items such as a rare, complete collection of Fiestaware nesting bowls ($1,495). 2108 W Belmont Ave (773-880-5599).

Lazy Dog Antiques
This shop presents a good mix of antique European furniture, artwork (mostly paintings), vintage lamps, jewelry and trinkets. Everything is displayed nicely, so you don’t have to do a lot of digging to find obscure items such as the pirate’s cannonballs salvaged by divers in the Caribbean ($150 each), prominently displayed near the cash register. Other standouts include a 1930s Scandinavian birch sideboard ($1,150), a mod 1960s red velvet sectional sofa ($485) and a 1930s white mink stole ($175). The basement houses lamps and memorabilia such as a Bingo board game from 1936 ($10). 1903 W Belmont Ave (773-281-3644).

Comments

0 comments