0
Add review

Glasgow Film Theatre

City Centre

The city’s first – and last – arthouse cinema is the focal point for the annual Glasgow Film Festival

As any film buff in the city will take great pride in explaining to you, Glasgow was once one of Britain’s great cinema cities – by the end of the 1940s it boasted 114 in all, with a total seating capacity of more than 175,000. Glasgow Film Theatre (GFT), originally called the Cosmo until 1973, opened in 1939 as Scotland’s first arthouse cinema, and only the second purpose-built arthouse cinema in Britain after the Curzon Mayfair in London.

Today, it remains effectively Glasgow’s last arthouse cinema – the number of picture houses in the city having rapidly dwindled in the second half of the twentieth century. But it’s in rude health these days, as a non-profit organisation supported by Glasgow City Council, under the umbrella of Glasgow Film. A third screen was added to the GFT in 2013 to maximise capacity, particularly during the booming annual Glasgow Film Festival every February, for which it operates as the main hub cinema and buzzes with premieres and events.

It’s no exaggeration to say that discerning cinema-goers will always find something to see at GFT – from arthouse and foreign-language gems, to independent documentaries, late night cult screenings and classics back on the big screen. More than that, GFT is always an experience to visit purely in and of itself. From the dramatic exterior – a brown brick, geometric, windowless façade inspired by Dutch modernist architecture – to the deliciously retro interior, particularly the sweeping 394-seat main cinema, it’s truly unique. The loss of Café Cosmo, the GFT’s café-bar space, to make way for the third screen was unfortunate, and has left the GFT without a substantial social space. But there remains the smaller upstairs bar – so you can still enjoy a beer while watching cinema at its very finest.

Venue name: Glasgow Film Theatre
Address: 12 Rose Street
Glasgow
G3 6RB
Venue phone: 0141 332 6535
Website: http://www.glasgowfilm.org/theatre
Transport: BR: Buchanan Steet. Underground: Cowcaddens
  • Brain-dead, sunken-eyed, shambling and gormless - London's 20-somethings don't look set to wrest control of the universe any time soon. In fact some are enough to make you despair of the human race. Take Shaun (Pegg), a genial bloke with lovely gi...
    Read more
  • Terry Jones scripted this fairy tale fantasy in which pubescent Connelly must negotiate the myriad dangers of a mazy goblin city and cross the Bog of Eternal Stench to reclaim her baby brother from the talons of Goblin King Bowie. If the narrative...
    Read more
  • Read more
  • Time Out says
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    This fictionalised retelling of the Norwegian adventurer Thor Heyerdahl’s 1947 Pacific crossing ought to come with a ‘Jackass’-style warning: don’t try this at home kids. In the 1940s, Heyerdahl (played by Pål Sverre Hagen with blue-eyed intensity...
    Read more
  • Time Out says
    • 5 out of 5 stars
    Christopher Nolan’s overwhelming, immersive and time-bending space epic ‘Interstellar’ makes Alfonso Cuarón’s ‘Gravity’ feel like a palate cleanser for the big meal to come. Where ‘Gravity’ was brief, contained and left the further bounds of the u...
    Read more
  • Time Out says
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    There are three things classic Disney animations are supposed to have. One: belting showtunes. Two: a bit of danger and darkness amid all the schmaltz. And three: a conservative message wrapped up in a traditional feelgood happy ending. Loosely in...
    Read more
  • Read more
  • Read more
  • Time Out says
    • 5 out of 5 stars
    This superb Nepal-set documentary hinges on a simple premise: a 16mm camera placed in a cable car travelling up to the Hindu Manakamana Temple almost a mile above sea level. The trip takes about ten minutes and each shot follows a different set of...
    Read more
  • Time Out says
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    This is a whale of a movie, grotesque and a little bloated but impossible to ignore. Its power and its horrors sneak up on you. It's a contemporary Russian tale, set on the shores of the Barents Sea, about the unholy powers of the state and the ch...
    Read more
LiveReviews|0
2 people listening