Lorenzo Vitturi interview: 'I've always been interested in states of precariousness'

The Italian artist tells us about trying to capture the spirit of Dalston

0

Comments

Add +
  • Lorenzo Vitturi

    'Pink #1 & 2 from the series Dalston Anatomy', 2013

    © Lorenzo Vitturi

    Lorenzo Vitturi
  • Lorenzo Vitturi

    'Hairy orange, yellow balloons and rotten camote #2 from the series Dalston Anatomy', 2013

    © Lorenzo Vitturi

    Lorenzo Vitturi
  • Lorenzo Vitturi

    'Yellow Chalk #1 & 2 from the series Dalston Anatomy', 2013

    © Lorenzo Vitturi

    Lorenzo Vitturi
  • Lorenzo Vitturi

    'Plastic Blue #1 & 2 from the series Dalston Anatomy', 2013

    © Lorenzo Vitturi

    Lorenzo Vitturi
  • Lorenzo Vitturi

    'Green Stripes #1 from the series Dalston Anatomy', 2013

    © Lorenzo Vitturi

    Lorenzo Vitturi

Lorenzo Vitturi

'Pink #1 & 2 from the series Dalston Anatomy', 2013

© Lorenzo Vitturi

Italian artist Lorenzo Vitturi has lived in Dalston for the past seven years. Inspired by Ridley Road market's kaleidoscope of fabrics, fruit and veg, he creates makeshift sculptures from scavenged bits and bobs, which he photographs as sumptuously surreal still lifes, and takes (often equally surreal) portraits of market traders. Ahead of his show at the Photographers' Gallery, he tells us about trying to capture the spirit of a neighbourhood in the throes of rapacious gentrification.

Why focus on Ridley Road market?
'The market is a symbol for Dalston, with its African and Middle Eastern communities, and how it's been changed by gentrification over the past few years. I really tried to find a way to express the beauty of the place, which is unique, and at the same time to describe the condition it finds itself in.'

You make three-dimensional objects and take pictures: are you a sculptor or a photographer?
'I studied photography but my work has always existed between sculpture, collage, set design and photography. Using all this organic stuff like fruit from the market, photography is the only way capture it - otherwise something might only last for five minutes.'

What will be on show at the Photographers' Gallery?
'There will be photographs and I'm also building a 3m x 5m sculpture using all these things that come from Dalston. You've got things from Africa, things from the pound shop, things from the street, so it's a big sort of sculptural mash-up.'

'I’m from Venice, which has been falling apart for centuries'

portrait: Davide Gallizio

Why does your work look like it's about to fall apart?
'I've always been interested in states of precariousness. I'm from Venice, which has been falling apart for centuries in the most beautiful way, so I think it's something that's a part of me.'

How do Venice and Dalston compare?
'Dalston won't sink into the sea like Venice. But at the same time it has been through big changes. I love Dalston because it alters so fast. There are negative effects, in terms of people being forced to move out because it's too expensive. But at the same time that's a part of the life of a city, this continuous process of changing.'

Can you see yourself moving away from the area?
'I've been making this work for two years, so maybe my next project will be about somewhere else. My girlfriend was living in the Central African Republic and she discovered this huge market in the middle of the jungle selling only Western products. I love the idea of finding the exact opposite of Ridley Road.'




Users say

0 comments