Ciné Lumière

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Ciné Lumière

The Ciné Lumière in South Kensington is the cinema of L’Institut Français du Royaume-Uni – or the French Cultural Institute, for English speakers. The venue offers a good mix of new releases (focusing on foreign, independent and, of course, French films) and retrospective seasons. Given its close association with the French government and cultural establishment, the Ciné Lumière regularly plays host to French filmmakers, in town to discuss their work. It’s an attractive venue more generally too. The cinema is welcoming and well equipped, while downstairs there’s a grand lobby area with a marble staircase and a café-restaurant that’s good for hanging out before or after a movie.

Posted:

Venue name: Ciné Lumière
Contact:
Address: Institut français
17 Queensberry Place
London
SW7 2DT
Transport: Tube: South Kensington
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