Great London bike rides

0

Comments

Add +

  • After dark | Retail therapy | Riverside City | Ten bridges | Battersea power  East to west

    Feature_londonbikerides_crop.jpgClotheshorse retail ride

    Put a basket on your bike and cycle to the independent shops of Holborn and Farringdon – or, if you’re wise, cycle past them…

    Miles: 3.1. Difficulty: Easy. Route: Bayley St to Russell Square, Guilford St, Lambs Conduit Street for a stop, then up Calthorpe St into Farringdon, Exmouth Market, Rosebery Ave, Myddleton Square, Colebrooke Row, Duncan St, Upper St, Camden Passage. Highlights: Russell Square and Exmouth Market.Apparently cycling is not all luminous Lycra, sweating and thighs the size of Chris Hoy’s – behold the stylish bike ride. Not only have I planned a route that includes some of London’s finest independent garment shops, I’m actually wearing a dress. This is only made possible by the Pashley Sonnet cycle I’ve rented – in red, to match my outfit. A traditional ladies’ bike with a dropped top bar, it allows me to dismount while preserving my modesty to Victorian standards. And the large front basket holds all my wares – although it should be noted that the more you buy, the less balance you have. With the finishing touch provided by my quirky helmet (a Bern Brighton from www.cyclechic.co.uk) I’m ready to set off.From the Time Out offices in Tottenham Court Road, I’ve decided not to head west down Oxford Street – aside from the general unpleasantness of the place, it’s pretty much devoid of alluring boutiques. Instead, I make my way north-east, down Bayley Street, towards the first highlight of the route: the lovely Russell Square Gardens (1). The sun is shining and I’m tempted to stop for a picnic on the grass, but as I’ve only been on the move for ten minutes and I did not pack lunch, I continue on my way. The first stop I make is on the quaint Lambs Conduit Street (2), which, happily, has been overlooked by redevelopment: its independent outlets still maintain their village-like idiosyncrasies. Stores to look out for include Persephone Books and Symphonic Records. There is also Bike Fix, a handy cycling store where I stop for help in raising my bike seat.Next I pass a small, quiet residential area, which leads me to my halfway point on the corner of Phoenix Place and Mount Pleasant: The Apple Tree. Majestic, high ceilings and a quality gastropub menu make it the perfect stop-off. Once refuelled, I only have a short cycle across a slightly tricky crossroads and I’m in Exmouth Market (3). It’s eccentric clothes shops galore under the avenue’s pretty fairy lights. And there are numerous trendy-looking café-bars for extra dawdling.My basket full, I tackle the only real incline of the trip – Amwell Street, at the top of which several charming low-roofed delis and Dickensian antique shops await. Then it’s on, past a pretty church, a busy Sadler’s Wells and a lovely private garden, until finally I’m in Camden Passage (4) near Angel, my destination. And it’s a shame I’ve got no money left. Everything from high-end jewellery boutiques to heavily laden junk shops line this cobbled lane and are a fitting conclusion to my delightful saddle-borne retail trail. Nina Kelly

    See a Google map of this route
    After dark | Retail therapy | Riverside City | Ten bridges | Battersea power  East to west

  • Add your comment to this feature
  • Page:
    | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |

After dark | Retail therapy | Riverside City | Ten bridges | Battersea power  East to west 3.1. Easy. Bayley St to Russell Square, Guilford St, Lambs Conduit Street for a stop, then up Calthorpe St into Farringdon, Exmouth Market, Rosebery Ave, Myddleton Square, Colebrooke Row, Duncan St, Upper St, Camden Passage. Russell Square and Exmouth Market.Apparently cycling is not all luminous Lycra, sweating and thighs the size of Chris Hoy’s – behold the stylish bike ride. Not only have I planned a route that includes some of London’s finest independent garment shops, I’m actually wearing a dress. This is only made possible by the Pashley Sonnet cycle I’ve rented – in red, to match my outfit. A traditional ladies’ bike with a dropped top bar, it allows me to dismount while preserving my modesty to Victorian standards. And the large front basket holds all my wares – although it should be noted that the more you buy, the less balance you have. With the finishing touch provided by my quirky helmet (a Bern Brighton from www.cyclechic.co.uk) I’m ready to set off.From the Time Out offices in Tottenham Court Road, I’ve decided not to head west down Oxford Street – aside from the general unpleasantness of the place, it’s pretty much devoid of alluring boutiques. Instead, I make my way north-east, down Bayley Street, towards the first highlight of the route: the lovely (1). The sun is shining and I’m tempted to stop for a picnic on the grass, but as I’ve only been on the move for ten minutes and I did not pack lunch, I continue on my way. The first stop I make is on the quaint (2), which, happily, has been overlooked by redevelopment: its independent outlets still maintain their village-like idiosyncrasies. Stores to look out for include Persephone Books and Symphonic Records. There is also Bike Fix, a handy cycling store where I stop for help in raising my bike seat.Next I pass a small, quiet residential area, which leads me to my halfway point on the corner of Phoenix Place and Mount Pleasant: The Apple Tree. Majestic, high ceilings and a quality gastropub menu make it the perfect stop-off. Once refuelled, I only have a short cycle across a slightly tricky crossroads and I’m in (3). It’s eccentric clothes shops galore under the avenue’s pretty fairy lights. And there are numerous trendy-looking café-bars for extra dawdling.My basket full, I tackle the only real incline of the trip – Amwell Street, at the top of which several charming low-roofed delis and Dickensian antique shops await. Then it’s on, past a pretty church, a busy Sadler’s Wells and a lovely private garden, until finally I’m in (4) near Angel, my destination. And it’s a shame I’ve got no money left. Everything from high-end jewellery boutiques to heavily laden junk shops line this cobbled lane and are a fitting conclusion to my delightful saddle-borne retail trail. See a Google map of this route After dark | Retail therapy | Riverside City | Ten bridges | Battersea power  East to west

Users say

0 comments