50 essential sci-fi films

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With JJ Abrams's 'Star Trek' already making waves and McG's 'Terminator Salvation' peeking up over the horizon, Time Out thought it would be a perfect time to select 50 essential sci-fi films, some of them classics, some not so classic, but all need to be seen...

1-10 | 11-20 | 21-30 | 31-40 | 41-50

Writers' Note: In order to restrict ourselves to 50 films, we opted to dismiss speculative films which deal with dystopian futures: as a result, great films like 'Blade Runner', 'Fahrenheit 451' and 'Hardware' will not be found in this list. We'll get around to those at a later date...

Additional note: The list below is in alphabetical order. We do not think 'The Abyss' is the greatest sci-fi movie ever made.

1. The Abyss (1989)


Directed by James Cameron
Ironically, it’s the sci-fi elements that almost sink Big Jim Cameron’s over-budget underwater adventure. The first two hours are a breathless, bulwark-crushing ride through the reinforced steel corridors of a deep-sea salvage platform precariously balanced on the lip of the eponymous crevasse. But the last act – whether it’s the original (interfered with by the studio) version, or the ‘Day the Earth Stood Still’ special edition cut – drags the film into starry-eyed space-cadet territory, and the less said about that giant pink rubber spaceship, the better… TH
Click here for the trailer of '
The Abyss'

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2. Alien (1979)

Directed by Ridley ScottIt will be argued elsewhere on this list that David Lynch’s ‘Dune’ remains the most persuasively imagined space opera of them all. While that film might well enjoy all the production values of the galaxy’s most elaborate Ferrero Rocher advert, it’s a stuffy, unwieldy goliath compared to Sir Ridley’s tambourine-tight space-trucking yarn. Superior man-in-a-suit scares may occasionally threaten to overshadow the elegant concepts, logical rigour and sheer majesty on show, but at the time ‘Alien’ offered sci-fi fans an alternative playground after George Lucas had bullied everyone off the swings. ALDClick here for the trailer of 'Alien'
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3. *Batteries Not Included (1987)

Directed by Matthew Robbins

+ Cocoon (1985)

Directed by Ron HowardWhile you could easily pair up the former with the liquid awfulness of Robin Williams’s soppy robo epic ‘Bicentennial Man’, and the latter – with its benign aliens landing on earth looking for peaceful co-existence – with something like ‘K-Pax’ or ‘Starman’, ‘*Batteries Not Included’ and ‘Cocoon’ make for the perfect partnership. Both films address the effect that extra terrestrials have on OAPs, sometimes imbuing them with a newfound joie de vivre, other times sending them to an early grave (but, of course, with the promise of rejuvenation). You could replace the aliens in both of these films with kittens and they would be no different. Both films star Jessica Tandy and involve crying. DJClick here for the trailer of 'Cocoon'

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4. Battle Beyond the Stars (1980)

Directed by Jimmy T MurakamiB-movie queen Sybil Danning smouldered from the poster as a space-Valkyrie Page 3 stunnah, but schoolboys expecting ‘Star Wars’ with special sauce were in for a disappointment. Animator Jimmy Murakami’s sole live action effort is a crash-and-burn interstellar re-working of ‘The Magnificent Seven’ (or ‘Seven Samurai’, cine-purists) that unwisely dabbles in comedy asides and Hollywood in-jokes. Neither casting nor script push the imaginative envelope, with Richard Thomas (John-Boy Walton) as the obligatory farmboy naïf on the receiving end of questions like ‘Does your race have… kiss?’. Somehow, the movie managed to pull big names like Robert Vaughn and George Peppard into its orbit, with the latter looking particularly ill at ease in the kind of cowboy ensemble that inspired Steve Martin’s party scene in ‘Parenthood’. Even the then industry-standard decision to blow the special effects budget on grey paint and hundreds of Airfix kits (resulting in the bustiest spaceship in cinema) can’t rescue ‘Battle…’ from the bargain-bin of ‘Star Wars’ knock-offs. PFClick here for the trailer of 'Battle Beyond the Stars'

 
 
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5. The Black Hole (1979)

Directed by Gary NelsonStagebound, plasticky and trading in ideas ranging from the tired to the flat-out preposterous, this megabucks Disney effort treats its audience with something like contempt. The assumption seems to be that sc-fi is kids’ stuff and that kids will lap up anything shiny and zappy, so let’s not concern ourselves that we have characters breathing in the vacuum of space or the fact that the script is as dull as ditchwater and as leaky as a giant sieve. A ghastly and woefully miscalculated attempt to cash-in on the post-‘Star Wars’ space craze (ditto for the same year’s Bond film ’Moonraker’) from the producer of sci-fi cornerstones ‘The Shaggy DA’ (1976) and ‘The Cat From Outer Space’ (1978). ALD Click here for the trailer of 'The Black Hole'
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6. Cherry 2000 (1987)

Directed by Steve De JarnattThe early Eighties were awash with films that bolted dubious bongo onto lo-fi sci-fi. Vaseline-lensed muckfest ‘Galaxina’ (1979), for example, was a tongue-in-cheek attempt at an interstellar stag movie, while ‘Inseminoid’ (1981) – which really is as nasty as it sounds – pandered to the gorehounds. None, however, were quite as polished, witty and effortlessly weird as this sexy satire starring Melanie Griffith as a shock-headed anarcha-feminist bounty hunter and no-budget genre mainstay Tim Thomerson as a despotic overlord addicted to cabana-wear. ALD
Click here for the trailer of '
Cherry 2000'
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7. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) + ET: The Extra Terrestrial (1982)

Directed by Steven SpielbergClose Encounters of the Third Kind’ isn’t just Steven Spielberg’s best work. It’s not just the greatest-ever sci-fi flick. In the opinion of some – a minority, admittedly, but a growing one – ‘Close Encounters’ is quite simply one of the finest movies ever made. As a work of populist science fiction, it’s one of the few films to create an atmosphere of monumental awe without resorting to scaremongering and wanton violence (even Kubrick couldn’t pull that off). But ‘Close Encounters’ is much more besides: a harrowing portrait of obsession and mounting insanity, a satire on the shattered nuclear family, and a stark (if admittedly slight) critique of American militarism, complete with a train car evacuation which directly anticipates ‘Schindler’s List’. Spielberg’s direction has never been more thrillingly inventive, John Williams’ wildly experimental score was an instant classic, and Richard Dreyfuss anchors the whole affair with his dumbstruck everyman central performance. Five years later, ‘ET’ all but repeated the same trick for younger viewers: funnier, more sympathetic and undoubtedly a masterpiece, it still doesn’t have quite the same quasi-religious impact as its predecessor. THClick here for the trailer of 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind'
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8. Contact (1997)

Directed by Robert Zemeckis

+ Sphere (1998)

Directed by Barry LevinsonExploration, doubt and clear-sighted investigations into man’s place in the universe mark out Zemeckis and Levinson’s diptych of sombre puzzlers – well, somber, that is, until ‘Sphere’ goes so heroically off the rails that all you can do is applaud. Ponderous talkathon ‘Contact’ was adapted from a blockbusting '70s door-stop by primetime cosmologist Carl Sagan while the lusty underwater thrills of ‘Sphere’ come direct from a lacklustre novel by Michael Crichton: Both honour their authors’ legacies with no little class. ALD
Click here for the trailer of '
Sphere'
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9. Critters (1986)

Directed by Stephen HerekOf the post-‘Gremlins’ wave of ‘our small town is being overrun by small angry creatures’ schlockers (see also ‘Ghoulies’, ‘Munchies’ and ‘Troll’), ‘Critters’ is the only one that stands up to modern scrutiny. Written and directed by ‘Bill & Ted’ mastermind Stephen Herek, the film succesfully eschews scares, characterization and narrative logic in favour of completely daft, occasionally bloody humour, with likeable, scattershot results. THClick here for the trailer of 'Critters'
dark_star.jpg

10. Dark Star (1974)

Directed by John CarpenterScripted by and starring ‘Alien’ creator Dan O’Bannon, this low budget masterpiece of light-speed torpor began life as a student film before being picked up for distribution. It’s the workaday story of four unkempt astronauts on an unending and ill-defined voyage to wipe out ‘unstable’ planets to make way for colonists. With these bored and beardy malcontents entrusted by an indifferent government with vastly powerful weaponry, the film's nod to the Vietnam war would not have been lost on contemporary audiences. Between brief bouts of destructive joy, life for theDark Star crew is characterised entirely by barely suppressed hostility, petty rivalry and childish territorial whining: anyone who’s ever been stuck in a flat share over a bank-holiday weekend will empathise. Fortunately for these long-haired planet killers, one of the ship’s intelligent bombs begins to develop consciousness, offering both the possibility of new and exciting conversation and an early end to their 9 to 5. All this plus 'Benson, Arizona', the theme penned by John Carpenter and Bill Taylor, remains one of the best country songs ever to address the emotional effects of faster-than-light travel. PF
Click here for a clip from 'Dark Star'
1-10 | 11-20 | 21-30 | 31-40 | 41-50

Users say

37 comments

Passing over on "Bladerunner" under the auspice of "leaving out films with a dystopian genre" (and thusly including films like Cherry 2000) is the biggest WTF I've ever seen in a list like this.  I agree with the others in that this could well be the worst list ever, lol.

Jay
Jay

This is quite possibly the worst top 50 list in the history of top 50 lists for any subject matter in the known universe and probably the unknown Universe as well.

lukej
lukej

Wow.... worst list EVER. 2001: a space odyssey? THE most influential and mind-blowing sci-fi epics ever. No? How about Howard the Duck, because, that's 'essential', right?

luap
luap

you EEDEEOT - worst list of 'essential Sci Fi films' ever. TimeOut London, find a grown up who's experienced enough to have seen everything and maybe also with some qualifications like Director of a sci fi film from 1975. Your journalistic credibility just took a major ding.

Rui
Rui

This seems to be a list of the worst sci-fi movies, you got it terribly wrong…

davidl
davidl

worst list of classic sci-fi I have ever seen. I'm surprised the Pokemon movie didn't make the list.

syntactics
syntactics

Howard the Duck... I wasted bandwidth on this list.

PracticalityPrevails
PracticalityPrevails

How on earth do you pathological retards read '50 essential sci-fi films' as 'top 50 sci-fi films'? Please don't use the internet, it is a waste of resources...

RedXIII UK
RedXIII UK

ITS ALPHABETICAL YOU MORONS... A-B-C-D-E...... i know its not your falt its your parents!

Lee Hawkins
Lee Hawkins

I think is the space cowboys movies are better than tops 10.

wildkatwriter
wildkatwriter

What a bizarre list! If this is a ranking, you've got the wrong top ten - *bateries not included above SOLARIS and 2001? Please. And there are some omissions...for starters, you haven't included Danny Boyle's 28 DAYS LATER or, more to the point, SUNSHINE which is an amazing film. No sign of Tarkovsky's STALKER, either.... you need to revisit this! Seriously.

zzOzz
zzOzz

A politicized list that makes no sense whatsoever- and definitely mis-titled for including films NOT to watch on an 'essential' list Some sort of very strange agenda is at play from this journo , thats for sure

chronicwombat
chronicwombat

This is such a strange article! Firstly, the title is "50 essential sci-fi films" even though theres more than 50?! For some inexplicable reason there are often 2 films under one rank, which I dont understand at all. Finally, one of the films in the list you describe as "A terrible film... a labour for anyone who actually has to watch the thing". Am I missing something here? This list includes films that are terrible and a labour to watch, and that makes it "essential"?! Because its such a "terrible" film that is such a "labour" to watch? Lol

remy
remy

uhh.. nevermind. I can see it is apparently "close enconunters of the third kind", which is by the way a masterful choice. nice work again, lads. looking forward for the "dystopian list".

remy
remy

ok, fine list, but could anyone from the staff answer me what is the one sci-fi movie you lads consider to be the greatest of all? I would be very pleased.

John
John

Haha, no blade runner BUT you did add Cherry 2000? Contradiction... Still its a fun list. I can't really see why some of these are essentially though.

TenGig
TenGig

Everyone that made a comment about Blade Runner or the order of the movies is a complete idiot, and obviously cannot read. Therefore, your comments are null and void, and you should run out and sodomize yourselves with retractable batons.

Rob
Rob

I agree, Blade Runner should clearly be in the top ten, if not at the top. Given that this seems a stubbornly eclectic list, I'm surprised not to see Saturn 3, surely it deserves a mention

Spike
Spike

Thanks for wasting our time. A random list of fims NOT even in alphabetical order. If you can't be bothered, don't.

critique
critique

I echo the comments made below by Fred and KN.

sanebloke
sanebloke

Goodness! The list is in ALPHABETICAL order. The writer has excluded all speculative films about "dystopian futures", WHICH IS WHY BLADE RUNNER ISN'T IN THE LIST. Oh, and while I'm on one, posts that dismiss lists simply because their personal favourite film isn't included make for terrifically dull reading!

marshall67
marshall67

Blade runner,predator,Aliens and not to mention the original Planet of the apes, as for critters your taking the pXXX.

Fred
Fred

Its a very strange criteria to exclude alleged 'speculative dystopian futures' when essentially all sci-fi is speculative futures, and most of the good stuff inevitably involves a dystopian element.

Madame Boogie
Madame Boogie

My god. I stopped reading your list to comment on your first post (which was awful) only to learn that you are an idiot. It is my goal to sink your post into obscurity so that no one ever takes anything you say seriously.

Madame Boogie
Madame Boogie

The Abyss?!! You lost me at hello. Please. That film was horrible and a cheap Alien ripoff. You start a list with that and you lose all credibility.

KN
KN

Getting seriously sick of these lists. Thes guys aren't even trying. Why not just call it "50 sci-fi films in no particularly relevant order which doesn't include some of the best ones".

Rico Detroit
Rico Detroit

Strike 1: Bladerunner is sci-fi, so...WTF? Strike 2: "Alien" but no "Aliens"? Strike 3: #3 on the list is two unconnected movies? Too sloppy to continue. Fail. (Why not just make it a top 100?)

omgwtfbbq
omgwtfbbq

Oh gee, let's not actually READ the disclaimer about a) the absence of Bladerunner and b) the order of this list before we start whining in the comments section.

Gary Hosty
Gary Hosty

This list is rendered null and void by the already mentioned abscence of BladeRunner, ?Matrix 1 anyone

kokila
kokila

where is the blade runner? one of the movie in the top 50 scifi movies.

Adam Lee Davies
Adam Lee Davies

'Blade Runner' is the coffee table book of sci-fi films Do you really need to know anything more about your coffee table? Do you?

Bob Ross
Bob Ross

So, why isn't Blade Runner here? It is by most accounts among the handful of greatest sci-fi films of all time. that oversight alone is enough to make this writer look very uninformed.

Rinse
Rinse

Awww the abyss sucked!!!! CONTACT?!?!?! Wouldnt have put event horizon in there, LOVE the movie, but its more a horror set in space. Why isnt Terminator 2 number 1? HOWARD THE DUCK!? CMON! 24. The Last Starfighter (1984) CHOICE! cop out with Star Trek ALL THE MOVIES there lol. but at least they didnt make the same mistake with empire, good lads. i woulda thought the matrix would be on there, but lists where all the items are obvious are poop which is why its nice to see some of the more classic b-movies on there :P

Nerd
Nerd

Actually The Abyss was set on an experimental deep-sea oil rig, not a salvage platform.



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