A Man Called Peter

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Scots-born, American-trained Presbyterian minister Peter Marshall, who was to gain national prominence as the Chaplain to the US Senate, is the subject of this unstoppably earnest CinemaScope biopic, where faith is unshaken even by a heart attack in the pulpit. The combination of Richard Todd and Hollywood religiosity makes a potent argument for descaling the kettle.
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Release details

UK release:

1955

Duration:

119 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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LiveReviews|4
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Martin Horan

I have just finished watching this film on Channel 4 (5/5/09) and it reminded me of what life was like in the free world when I was a boy. How it made me wish that the world was still like that--a decent world when politicians tried to be men of honour and when journalism was objective and not politically motivated. This film shows how we have sunk as a people into the deepest pit of slime in humanity's history. Actually, it shows that since 1953, we have gone a long, long way from what we once were. As a social document, though that was never the film's intention, it shows what America--and to an extent Britain--once was but can never be again. It would take for us to become a nation of Peter Marshalls first and that's not going to happen. Oh that it could! It's a film well worth seeing.

Martin Horan

I have just finished watching this film on Channel 4 (5/5/09) and it reminded me of what life was like in the free world when I was a boy. How it made me wish that the world was still like that--a decent world when politicians tried to be men of honour and when journalism was objective and not politically motivated. This film shows how we have sunk as a people into the deepest pit of slime in humanity's history. Actually, it shows that since 1953, we have gone a long, long way from what we once were. As a social document, though that was never the film's intention, it shows what America--and to an extent Britain--once was but can never be again. It would take for us to become a nation of Peter Marshalls first and that's not going to happen. Oh that it could! It's a film well worth seeing.

John Wilby

The Time Out cynical review is the best argument for viewing this movie which addresses most of modern society's ills in a convincing and spritually uplifting way

John Wilby

The Time Out cynical review is the best argument for viewing this movie which addresses most of modern society's ills in a convincing and spritually uplifting way