A tribute to David Carradine

0

Comments

Add +

Time Out mourns the passing of American actor David Carradine by looking at some of his greatest roles...

Five Carradine classics...


The Serpent’s Egg (1977)
Ingmar Bergman’s one-and-only ‘Hollywood’ movie features the unlikely pairing of regular muse Liv Ullman with Carradine as a Jewish trapeze artist and is set in a gaudily realised Berlin circa 1920. The film follows him as he wanders drunkenly around the brothels and cabaret bars, trying to ignore the violence, depravity and anti-semitism screeching at him from every street corner.Bound For Glory (1976)Starring Carradine in a rare non-chop socky role as Woody Guthrie, ‘Bound for Glory’ stands as perhaps the jewel in the crown for one of New Hollywood’s most underrated figures, Hal Ashby. For a music biopic, it’s uncharacteristically elegiac and sombre, with Carradine offering a beautifully textured central turn as the class warrior-cum-boxcar troubadour. Haskell Wexler scooped an Oscar for his gorgeous camerawork which perfectly captures the unease of 1930s Depression-era America and which inspired Guthrie to spread his message of working-class upheaval.

Death Race 2000 (1975)
'With half a face and half a chest and all the guts in the world, he's back!' It may not have been his most serious role, but the part of Frankenstein, the masked motor-racing avenger in Roger Corman's 200mph satirical juggernaut, may prove Carradine's most memorable. His unmasking scene, in which both the audience and nubile 'navigator' Annie realise Frankenstein is far from the twisted monster of legend but actually a sleek, rather dashing revolutionary hero, remains one of his finest moments on screen. Dry, witty and effortlessly likeable: this is a movie star, ladies and gentlemen.

The Long Riders (1980)
The Keach brothers may have nabbed the flashier roles of Frank and Jesse James in Walter Hill's masterful sibling rivalry Western, but it's Carradine and his brethren who command the attention onscreen. As the sad-eyed, dominant Cole Younger, Carradine feels like a one-man elegy not just for the dying West, but for the Hollywood '70s, his loose, brash performance style fast becoming outdated in the slick corporate '80s.

The Winged Serpent (1982)
A relatively rare straight-man role. Carradine may have been acted off the screen by Michael Moriarty's ludicrous hep-talking petty thief in Larry Cohen's gloriously wacky NYC creature feature, but, frankly, Brando would have struggled under the circumstances. As it is Carradine, along with his none-more-smooth partner Richard 'Shaft' Roundtree, provides much-needed gravitas, heavyweight acting ballast to counteract Moriarty's bonkers improv.

And five lesser known Carradine titles which, if you've seen, we'd love to know what they're like...

Safari 3000 (1982)Carradine joins Christopher Lee and Stockard Channing for what we can only imagine to be a one-louder Trans-African cannonball run set against a backdrop of busy innuendo and scratchy stock footage. Co-stars Cocky Two Bull as ‘Rally-Car Salesman #1’.Tropical Snow (1988)Sounding like one of those made-up film titles that feature regularly in ‘Seinfeld’, this bills itself as a steamy drug-trafficking parable co-starring a young Madeleine Stowe, and sees Dave as a character known only as Oskar – which we assume means he’s the baddie.

Sublet (1998)
Quite how a film labouring under the title of a woefully contrived comedy (in which Ben Stiller sublets his apartment to… what? A basketball team, maybe? A dolphin?) can somehow also be know in certain territories as ‘Codename: Jaguar’ we are very keen to find out.

Animal Protector (1988)
Ditto for this one, which is for some tantalising reason known as ‘Born To Kill’ in India. A Swedish ‘Island of Dr. Moreau’ co-starring Magnus Cederblad? We’re sold.

Evil Toons (1992)
Looking like a bongo version of ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ from the always-exciting directorial talent, Fred Olen Ray (see also, ‘Bikini Airways’, ‘Bikini Chain Gang’ and ‘Bikini Pirates’), Carradine stars as the austerely monikered Gideon Fisk, a man who arrives at a haunted house being occupied by four teenage bikini models. He delivers a mystic tome, from which they read, and inadvertently release a bunch of evil 'toons. Fin.

www.timeout.com/film

Author: Adam Lee Davies, David Jenkins, Tom Huddleston



Users say

0 comments


Top Stories

Meet the dream team: a preview of ‘Les Misérables’

Meet the dream team: a preview of ‘Les Misérables’

Director Tom Hooper and his cast tell us how they turned the super-musical into movie blockbuster.

Oscar predictions

Oscar predictions

The Time Out film team weighs in on the nominees for the 2013 Academy Awards

January film highlights 2013

January film highlights 2013

Get ready for the big guns… Spielberg, Tarantino and Bigelow

October film highlights

October film highlights

Daniel Craig’s 007 comeback, a genius indie romcom and all the mysteries behind ‘The Shining’ unravelled.

The Time Out film debate 2012 highlights

The Time Out film debate 2012 highlights

The results of our study on the state of films and filmgoing in 2012.

Read 'Time Out film debate 2012 highlights'

Martin Freeman interview

Martin Freeman interview

'The Hobbit' actor tells us why he wouldn't have a pint with Bilbo Baggins.

Sam Mendes interview

Sam Mendes interview

Dave Calhoun speaks to the director of 'Skyfall' about the latest film in the Bond franchise.

Ang Lee interview

Ang Lee interview

The genre-hopping director tells us how he invented a new genre with 'Life of Pi'

Michael Haneke interview

Michael Haneke interview

The twice Palme d'Or-winning director discusses 'Amour'.

Read our interview with Michael Haneke

Thomas Vinterberg interview

Thomas Vinterberg interview

The Danish director talks about his powerful new drama 'The Hunt'.

Read our interview with Thomas Vinterberg'

Ten things the 'Twilight' movies did for us

Ten things the 'Twilight' movies did for us

Time Out looks back at the impact of the 'Twilight' saga.

Discover what 'Twilight' has done for us

On the set of 'Sightseers'

On the set of 'Sightseers'

Time Out heads to the Lake District to visit director Ben Wheatley on set.

Read about our visit to the 'Sightseers' set

Tim Burton interview

Tim Burton interview

The director talks about 'Frankenweenie', which he describes as 'the ultimate memory piece'.

Read our interview with Tim burton

The top ten Christmas films of 2012

The top ten Christmas films of 2012

Our pick of the best films showing over the festive period.

Read 'The top ten Christmas films of 2012'

What's your film guilty pleasure?

What's your film guilty pleasure?

Mean Girls? Dirty Dancing? Tell us your favourite film guilty pleasure.

Read 'Film guilty pleasures'

When teen stars turn serious

When teen stars turn serious

Ten young actors come of age on the silver screen.

Read 'When teen stars turn serious'

50 years of James Bond

50 years of James Bond

From Connery to Craig, we revisit all 22 Bond films.

Read '50 years of James Bond'

Paul Thomas Anderson interview

Paul Thomas Anderson interview

The director talks Scientology and working with Joaquin Phoenix.

Read the interview

Hilarious horror films

Hilarious horror films


Ten funny horror movies which went spectacularly off the rails.

Read 'Hilarious horror films'

Martin McDonagh interview

Martin McDonagh interview

The director talks psychopaths and theatre – 'my least favourite artform'.

Read the interview

Autumn horror films

Autumn horror films

We round-up the five best horror movies of Autumn 2012.

Read about this Autumn's best horror movies

On the set of Skyfall

On the set of Skyfall

Time Out visits Istanbul to see the latest Bond movie being made.

Read 'On the set of Skyfall'

Bond: then and now

Bond: then and now

Does Skyfall refresh or rehash the James Bond franchise?

Sally Potter interview

Sally Potter interview

The British director explains why 'Ginger and Rosa' is her most mainstream film yet.

Daniel Craig interview

Daniel Craig interview

'I’m almost as in demand as Brad Pitt’