Akira Kurosawa's Dreams

Film

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Time Out says

Depicting, rather indulgently, a number of dreams vaguely intended to reflect Kurosawa's life and abiding obsessions, this is - to be frank - regrettably embarrassing. Its eight episodes, moving from childhood through war to a terror of nuclear pollution, are wholly devoid of narrative drive. Kurosawa's penchant for metaphor leads to risibly misguided and inadequate clichés: life's vicissitudes seen as a long mountain trek through a blizzard, the guilty aftermath of war as dark at the end of a tunnel, scientific fervour as a lemmings' leap into the abyss. Not a little reactionary, the film's main achievement is to show a once impressive director quite out of touch both with the world and with developments in cinema. Much of it is like a moron's guide to the Green manifesto, transforming serious issues into banal trivia, while George Lucas' Industrial Light and Magic supply surprisingly shoddy visual effects. Only during a final procession does the old Kurosawa magic get a brief look-in, but by then the hackneyed moralising and dramatic languor have ensured that, despite the well-meaning message, it's hard to care.
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Release details

UK release:

1990

Duration:

119 mins

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Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

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Zoeb

Hard to care? Absolutely not. Granted, there are a few dreams which are not that effective and true, there are times when Kurosawa indulges himself too much but there are also some fascinating vignettes that ring so true. My favorites were 'The Blizzard'- which feels like an epic struggle against the comforting certainty of death and decline-, 'The Tunnel'- a fantastically thought-provoking and bitter argument against war which was really very moving and stirring, 'The Peach Orchard', which showed us the evils of deforestation through the eyes of a child and finally the best dream- 'The Weeping Demon' which showed us the plausible evils of nuclear destruction....Overall, it was a thought-provoking experience

Zoeb

Hard to care? Absolutely not. Granted, there are a few dreams which are not that effective and true, there are times when Kurosawa indulges himself too much but there are also some fascinating vignettes that ring so true. My favorites were 'The Blizzard'- which feels like an epic struggle against the comforting certainty of death and decline-, 'The Tunnel'- a fantastically thought-provoking and bitter argument against war which was really very moving and stirring, 'The Peach Orchard', which showed us the evils of deforestation through the eyes of a child and finally the best dream- 'The Weeping Demon' which showed us the plausible evils of nuclear destruction....Overall, it was a thought-provoking experience