Battle of Britain

Film

War films

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Dull, all-star treatment of a potentially stirring historical event, notable mainly for its lengthy, boring and far too numerous dogfight sequences, the tediousness of which is matched by the dialogue which the unfortunate actors are forced to deliver whenever they are grounded.
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Release details

UK release:

1969

Duration:

131 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

4.1 / 5

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LiveReviews|9
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Mike

Battle of Britain is a classic for a number of things; it does not attempt to be a caricature of the era, as Michael Bay's "Pearl Harbour" was. The film documents in extraordinary detail the struggle involved in crushing the Nazi air force in the early stages of the war. With its beautiful aerial sequences and outstanding authenticity, Battle of Britain is a classic not to be missed.

Mike

Battle of Britain is a classic for a number of things; it does not attempt to be a caricature of the era, as Michael Bay's "Pearl Harbour" was. The film documents in extraordinary detail the struggle involved in crushing the Nazi air force in the early stages of the war. With its beautiful aerial sequences and outstanding authenticity, Battle of Britain is a classic not to be missed.

chris

my favorite film have read the book about making of the film and it was no mean feat

chris

my favorite film have read the book about making of the film and it was no mean feat

HP

Wow, you really shot this one down. Mostly I agree- the characters were given very dull rolls, nothing developed and nothing followed through. There was no human side to this epic recreation of history. Where were the air aces such as Johnie Johnson and Douglas Bader? On the plus sides, the dog fights give a flavour of what it must have been like to have blasted a Meshersmit from the skies.

Alex

It's one of my favourite films too. Of course the dogfight sequences are numerous-that's what the Battle of Britain was actually about! It wasn't some small irrelevant event-the nation was fighting for it's very survival, and by constantly attacking the Luftwaffe in endless massed dogfights, the RAF forced the Germans to abandon their invasion plans for Britain. The numerous flying scenes were the main highlight of the film and, for me at least, captured the essence of what it must have been like to have been an RAF fighter pilot, fighting over own your homeland to defend it from an evil and sinister invasion power, who would have subjugated the nation in a very unpleasant manner, judging from the experience of the occupied European powers who had been defeated by Nazi Germany. Failure really wasn't an option. True, the romance scenes were a bit tedious, but fighter pilots did have wives and girlfriends, and relationships were tested to the limit. The RAF pilots did spend tense hours waiting at the disperal huts for the order to 'scramble', and there was little or no respite from the exhaustion of relentless combat, and possible death in a horrible manner, as portrayed in several of the film's sequences. But they either fought, or the nation died. Myself, and others in Britain, are fortunate to be able to write reviews like this in a nation that is free today because of the sacrifices of our forefathers. War is a bloody and messy business, with no glamour. For me the numerous dogfights captured the full horror of aerial combat, and the flying scenes pulled no punches-they were raw and gritty. The Battle of Britain was the first major failure of the Nazi War Machine, and marked a very significant turning point in the war, forcing Hitler to turn East, and attack Soviet Russia, thereby allowing undefeated Britain, with massive American material assistance, to eventually open the Second Front against Nazi Germany and speed it's defeat, in conjunction with the gigantic exertions of the Red Army, who bore the brunt of the land-based Nazi War Machine, and suffered unimaginable losses in eventually destroying the German Army. But the Battle of Britain was the starting point, which gave a beacon of hope to the world that the Germans could be defeated in battle. Britain may have stood alone, but it stood undefeated at the end of the battle, due to the sacrifices of 'The Few', and everyone who supported them in whatever roles they fulfilled. Churchill's words still ring true today.

Alex

It's one of my favourite films too. Of course the dogfight sequences are numerous-that's what the Battle of Britain was actually about! It wasn't some small irrelevant event-the nation was fighting for it's very survival, and by constantly attacking the Luftwaffe in endless massed dogfights, the RAF forced the Germans to abandon their invasion plans for Britain. The numerous flying scenes were the main highlight of the film and, for me at least, captured the essence of what it must have been like to have been an RAF fighter pilot, fighting over own your homeland to defend it from an evil and sinister invasion power, who would have subjugated the nation in a very unpleasant manner, judging from the experience of the occupied European powers who had been defeated by Nazi Germany. Failure really wasn't an option. True, the romance scenes were a bit tedious, but fighter pilots did have wives and girlfriends, and relationships were tested to the limit. The RAF pilots did spend tense hours waiting at the disperal huts for the order to 'scramble', and there was little or no respite from the exhaustion of relentless combat, and possible death in a horrible manner, as portrayed in several of the film's sequences. But they either fought, or the nation died. Myself, and others in Britain, are fortunate to be able to write reviews like this in a nation that is free today because of the sacrifices of our forefathers. War is a bloody and messy business, with no glamour. For me the numerous dogfights captured the full horror of aerial combat, and the flying scenes pulled no punches-they were raw and gritty. The Battle of Britain was the first major failure of the Nazi War Machine, and marked a very significant turning point in the war, forcing Hitler to turn East, and attack Soviet Russia, thereby allowing undefeated Britain, with massive American material assistance, to eventually open the Second Front against Nazi Germany and speed it's defeat, in conjunction with the gigantic exertions of the Red Army, who bore the brunt of the land-based Nazi War Machine, and suffered unimaginable losses in eventually destroying the German Army. But the Battle of Britain was the starting point, which gave a beacon of hope to the world that the Germans could be defeated in battle. Britain may have stood alone, but it stood undefeated at the end of the battle, due to the sacrifices of 'The Few', and everyone who supported them in whatever roles they fulfilled. Churchill's words still ring true today.

Mark A Satterthwaite

Maybe you have to be British, but this is one of my all time favorite films. It is both moving and stirring portraying Britain and the British people well at a time of great peril and achievement. The numerous "dog-fights" are necessary and exciting, since this is what the film is about, what!

Mark A Satterthwaite

Maybe you have to be British, but this is one of my all time favorite films. It is both moving and stirring portraying Britain and the British people well at a time of great peril and achievement. The numerous "dog-fights" are necessary and exciting, since this is what the film is about, what!