Blake Morrison: interview

0

Comments

Add +

Soon after Blake Morrison‘s father died from cancer in 1991, the poet, writer and editor wrote ’And When Did You Last See Your Father?‘, a memoir of his childhood and the weeks leading up to his father‘s death. The book has now been made into a film written by David Nicholls (’Starter for Ten‘) and directed by Anand Tucker (’Hilary and Jackie‘, ’Shopgirl‘).

Blake Morrison: interview
Blake Morrison

Does Jim Broadbent seem similar to your father?

It just seems to work. Physically, Jim is not like my dad exactly. He’s tall, while my dad was short, and yet you forget that when you’re watching the film. I know I’m watching it from a particular perspective of course: he’s my father and nobody else is going to be thinking that. It’s interesting because Jim did come and talk to me about my father and what he was like and his mannerisms. But I think part of the reason his performance is so good is that his father was similar. He told me that his father was into a lot of the same things to do with cars and women as my dad. I think that’s why he’s so powerful at being my dad.

It must be flattering to be played by Colin Firth?

Yes, well Colin is Colin and he’s played writers before. He’d read the book and he’d also read my book about my mother. I didn’t meet Colin until the film was being made, he didn’t feel the need to research me. The casting of Jim Broadbent as my dad is much more decisive because my father should dominate the film as this larger-than-life person. I tried to write an early version of the screenplay myself and the problem was that I could never write myself, this character of ‘Blake’. Writing a memoir is very different from constructing a character.

You manage to recall so much detail from your childhood.

Of course it’s possible that I’ve misremembered some things but I was spending an awful lot of time in my parents’ home when my father died, which was near the house where I spent my childhood. I was surrounded by detail. My parents never chucked anything away, so everything was there. Memories would be triggered just by objects; my father’s stuff on his desk and so on. I think that’s why I included so much detail. If I’d been sitting in London, I wouldn’t have been able to do it.

Would you say this is more an adaptation of your book than a dramatisation of your life?

Yes, I think so. David Nicholls rang me up once very briefly when he was working on the script, so it’s not like he was writing a biography of someone he knew, he was working straight from the book. I was asked my opinion sometimes, and they could choose to ignore it. In an odd way, the book has become my memory of my childhood. Many memories went in there; there’s not a stash of them that I’ve never written about.A lot of time has passed now, so I feel that I can let go. If it had been two years after the book came out, and three years after my father had died, I would probably feel a lot more possessive, but you’ve got to let them make their own thing of it.

You say in a later afterword to your book that you were surprised how many readers contacted you and treated you as an agony uncle. Do you expect the same again?

Well, I think they’ll be writing to Colin instead of me! I’ve had some emails from the film’s website from Colin’s fans, and this morning I had one from someone who asked: ‘How accurate is Gina McKee as your wife as I think I could have done that really well, especially with Colin lying on top of me…’ You realise what the poor guy’s up against.I do think people will be moved by the film, not everybody, but rather in a Diana way; you know, that some people weeping for Diana were weeping for some loss of their own.

Several writers of your generation have written of their parents since your book – Martin Amis, Hanif Kureishi, Graham Swift, Nick Hornby.

Yes, that’s right. I don’t know if it’s our generation or if it’s true of all generations but it’s common to think your parents are very boring and not to be interested in their lives or their past, and then at a certain point, maybe when you have children, you begin to appreciate their other qualities. Then, of course, when they get ill and die, you get really, really curious. When my father died, ordinary objects became very precious to me; I’ve still got some of them, like the pacemaker that was cut out of him after he died. It’s a reappraisal of the relationship, partly out of the guilt that you never did them justice when you were young.And When Did You Last See Your Father?’ opens on Friday.

Author: Dave Calhoun



Users say

4 comments
alex stone
alex stone

WHAT WAS THE NAME OF JIM BROADBENTS CAR IN THE MOVIE

Geoff Gammon
Geoff Gammon

I cannot express fully how I feel. I am perplexed. It is as though you have stolen my life. This film is my life, except I was 16 when my Father died at the age of 50. I am now 53, I have real highs and deep, deep lows. My life is the sequel to this film. I have never reconciled my Fathers death. I should like to communicate with Blake Morrison. It worries me to now know this film exsists. It rips me appart!

Ali Weisenberg
Ali Weisenberg

I saw the film and thought it was very moving, as well as humorous in parts. Like the author says "Colin is Colin" and he's great of course, but I was also very impressed with the young actopr who played Blake aas a teenager. I think we'll be seeing more of him! I will now be reading the book.

Lin Hurdwell
Lin Hurdwell

I saw the film and found it beautiful, so well acted and very emotive. I have recently lost my mother, and my husband has cancer, so I suppose the thoughts spoken are very near to me personally. Well done,I loved it, now will read the book.



Top Stories

Paul Thomas Anderson interview

Paul Thomas Anderson interview

The director talks Scientology and working with Joaquin Phoenix.

Read the interview

Hilarious horror films

Hilarious horror films

Ten funny horror movies which went spectacularly off the rails.

Read 'Hilarious horror films'

What's your film guilty pleasure?

What's your film guilty pleasure?

Mean Girls? Dirty Dancing? Tell us your favourite film guilty pleasure.

Read 'Film guilty pleasures'

50 years of James Bond

50 years of James Bond

From Connery to Craig, we revisit all 22 Bond films.

Read '50 years of James Bond'

Autumn horror films

Autumn horror films

We round-up the five best horror movies of Autumn 2012.

Read about this Autumn's best horror movies

On the set of Skyfall

On the set of Skyfall

Time Out visits Istanbul to see the latest Bond movie being made.

Read 'On the set of Skyfall'

When teen stars turn serious

When teen stars turn serious

Ten young actors come of age on the silver screen.

Read 'When teen stars turn serious'

Bond: then and now

Bond: then and now

Does Skyfall refresh or rehash the James Bond franchise?

October film highlights

October film highlights

Daniel Craig’s 007 comeback, a genius indie romcom and all the mysteries behind ‘The Shining’ unravelled.

Sam Mendes interview

Sam Mendes interview

Dave Calhoun speaks to the director of 'Skyfall' about the latest film in the Bond franchise.

Sally Potter interview

Sally Potter interview

The British director explains why 'Ginger and Rosa' is her most mainstream film yet.

Daniel Craig interview

Daniel Craig interview

'I’m almost as in demand as Brad Pitt’

Tim Burton interview

Tim Burton interview

The director talks about his new film, 'Frankenweenie', which he describes as 'the ultimate memory piece'.