Blog: Cannes 2010 – The wrap-up

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Dave Calhoun offers blogs, news and instant reaction direct from the screening rooms of the 2010 Cannes Film Festival

Epilogue

May 24, 2010 – 3pm

Cannes: the final report
The Cannes Film Festival ended last night with the ceremony to win the Palme d'Or.

You can read my final report on the festival here.



And here you can discover who we think should have won the prizes.


 

Day Twelve

May 23, 2010 – 7pmThe Cannes Film Festival is over, and here's a list of who won what:

Palme d'Or: 'Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives' by Apichatpong Weerasethakul
Grand Prize: 'Of Gods and Men' by Xavier Beauvois
Best Actor: Javier Bardem ('Biutiful') and Elio Germano ('La Nostra Vita')
Best Actress: Juliette Binoche ('Certified Copy')
Best Director: Mathieu Amalric ('Tournée’)
Best Screenplay: Lee Chang Dong ('Poetry')

Day Ten

May 21, 2010 – 4pm
Who will win the top prize on Sunday?
We're on the home stretch. Cannes ends on Sunday with the ceremony to award the Palme d'Or and other prizes. But already the festival is winding up. There are just two more films left to screen in the 19-film competition. Tonight, there's the Hungarian 'Tender Son - The Frankenstein Project', from Kornél Mundruczó, who had the underwhelming 'Delta' in competition a couple of years ago. Tomorrow morning, there's 'Burnt by the Sun 2' from Russia director Nikita Mikhalkov.The Hungarian director is a bit of an unknown, although his 'Delta' had its fans (not me), and it doesn't sound like the Russian film will be troubling the jury: the first 'Burnt by the Sun' won the festival's Grand Prix in 1994, but Mikhalkov's latest film has already had terrible reviews on the back of a very unsuccessful release in Russia. Which means that the prize winners have probably already screened – and equally probably been reviewed in this blog. Scroll down and have a look.So who do I think will win the Palme d'Or?
Last year, it was Michael Haneke's to lose - and so it proved when his 'The White Ribbon' was awarded the Palme d'Or by Isabelle Huppert's jury. But there's no such frontrunner for Tim Burton's jury to choose this year. I think Mike Leigh's 'Another Year' has to be in with a good chance. It's one of those films that sticks with you, reminding you of its themes of passing time, sadness, loneliness and the limits of empathy for days after seeing it. It screened almost a week ago, but it's the sort of film that may have stuck in the minds and hearts of jury members.Uncle Boonmee.jpgI also think that Xavier Beauvois's 'Of Gods and Men' is a favourite, and Rachid Bouchareb's 'Outside the Law’ too. Both are reviewed below. Last night we saw the Thai film 'Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives' from Apichatpong Weerasethakul, which my colleague Geoff Andrew has reviewed Apichatpong Weerasethakul's deliciously-titled 'Uncle Bonmee Who Can Recall Past Lives', which has been dividing audiences at Cannes since it screened here last night.

Read Geoff Andrew's review here

Also, I overheard a conversation between two Italians this morning, one of whom claims to know jury member Alberto Barbera, who had told him that the jury were big fans of the Italian film 'La Nostra Vita'. I couldn't stomach this light, baggytale of a young father who has to rebuild his life after losing his wife during childbirth. It dresses some pertinent themes about the new Italy in some very sentimental clothes.All in all, it's a tough year to predict, but I'm going to have a shot.Here's which films I think might win the major prizes, although to be honest I think lots of these films could easily win in a category other than the one I've suggested.Come back on Monday to laugh at just how wrong I was when I'll be looking over the prizes and reacting to which films and filmmakers won which prizes.
Palme d'Or
'Another Year' by Mike LeighGrand Prix 'Of Gods and Men' by Xavier BeauvoisJury Prize 'Uncle Boonme Who Can Recall Past Lives' by Apichatpong WeerasethakulBest Director Rachid Bouchareb for 'Outside the Law'Best Writer Daniele Luchetti for 'La Nostra Vita'Best Actor Mark Womack for 'Route Irish' or an ensemble prize for 'Of Gods and Men'Best Actress Yung Jung-hee for 'Poetry'

Day Ten

May 21, 2010 – 1pm
Rachid Bouchareb returns to incendiary thriller mode
Controversy was already buzzing around French-Algerian filmmaker Rachid Bouchareb’s ‘Outside the Law’ (‘Hors-La-Loi’), his film about Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) from the 1940s to 1960s, before it screened in Cannes. Earlier this year, a politician in Sarkozy’s government ordered France’s defence ministry to survey Bouchareb’s script for its historical accuracy, and the subsequent report decided it was full of holes, thus fuelling an angry debate in the French press and calls for Cannes to withdraw the film – which were ignored. Then last week Bouchareb, whose previous film 'Days of Glory' told of the contribution of French North African troops to France's liberation in the 1940s, issued a statement about 'Outside the Law' calling for a ‘spirit of mutual respect’ around the film’s unveiling in Cannes today.The film finally screened this morning. There were extra security guards on the door of the cinema confiscating all food and drink, seemingly in anticipation of some sort of angry food fight if the assembled critics took against the film. As it was, it was received with polite and deserved applause. And no doubt all this fuss has gained the film some handy publicity. I’ve reviewed the film below.

Read Dave Calhoun's review here

Day Nine

May 20, 2010 – 4pm
Ken you dig it?
I'm looking out of the window onto Cannes' red carpet and a tie-less Ken Loach is about to walk the red carpet for 'Route Irish', his film about private contractors working in Iraq in the aftermath of the invasion (review here )A French journalist interviews him on the red carpet for the festival TV channel. Loach says he thinks those who started the Iraq war still need to be brought to justice. The journalist asks whether he thinks that will happen. 'Well, they pursued Nazi war criminals for 60, 70 years, We have to keep pursuing Blair and Bush.'The reaction to 'Route Irish' has been mixed. You can see my review here. But there's no denying that Loach is still an essential force in cinema at the age of 73. The sad thing is that he's much more revered - and known - here in France than in the UK.

Day Nine

May 20, 2010 – 3pm
The most stimulating film of the festival so far?
Call me a wimp, but I chose not to sit through 'Carlos', Olivier Assayas's five-hour Carlos the Jackal biopic, yesterday afternoon. I had a good excuse: I had to see the new Ken Loach film (which I've reviewed below) and Geoff Andrew suffered a sore rear instead. He's reviewed 'Carlos' here. By my reckoning, that's about one star for each 90 minutes of viewing.

Read Geoff Andrew's review here

I've just seen a truly fascinating new film by American filmmaker Lodge Kerrigan ('Keane'). Kerrigan shot 'Rebecca H. (Return to the Dogs)' in Paris, and it's a strange, stimulating essay on actors and characters, performers and performance. Beginning and ending with footage of Jefferson Airplane's Grace Slick performing in D A Pennebaker's 'Monterey Pop' , the film features French actress Géraldine Pailhas playing various permutations of an actress and her characters, one of whom is Slick as resurrected in a feature film by, yes, Lodge Kerrigan (who appears as himself in a few scenes) and featuring Pascal Greggory, who also takes on several personas. 034619.jpgSounds a little 'meta'? It's a wonderfully slippery film – just when you think you've got your head round it and its unusual logic, it pulls away from you again. On the way out, I heard one person tell me it felt like a tribute to Katrin Cartlidge (I didn't get that), another that there were far too many, 'slow cinema'-style long takes of the backs of heads for his liking and yet another that it was one of the most stimulating films of the festival so far. I'd agree with that last comment. I can't wait to see it again.


Day Nine

May 20, 2010 – 11am

No, not the Cindy Crawford/William Baldwin erotic thriller...
Just seen Doug Liman's 'Fair Game' – a solid, measured and indignant retelling of the story of CIA agent Valerie Plame Wilson (Naomi Watts) whose identity was revealed by the US government after her husband Joe Wilson (Sean Penn), a former US diplomat, publicly disagreed with the government's line on the selling of uranium by west African states. Liman– and sibling writers Jez and John-Henry Butterworth – do a good job of balancing the wider picture with the personal fallout for the Wilsons. You could say the story of WMDs has been done to death, but 'Fair Game' keeps the flame of protest alive. Penn and Watts make an effective pairing.My colleague Geoff Andrew has reviewed 'Poetry', the South Korean film which screened in competition here yesterday. The lead actress in the film must be a contender for the best actress prize on Sunday. Although I still think Lesley Manville from Mike Leigh's 'Another Year' must be the favourite for that one.

Read Geoff Andrew's review here


Day Eight

May 19, 2010 – 2pm
Loach's late-arriving shot at glory
Ken Loach's 'Route Irish', a last-minute addition to the 19 films competing for the Palme d'Or, screened this morning. It's an urgent, important work. It's not one of his best, but it's bound to stir up a debate about the issues at its heart to do with foreign conflicts and post-traumatic stress syndrome. It also features a strong lead performance from Mark Womack.

Read Dave Calhoun's review here

Day Eight

May 19, 2010 – 10amA potential prizewinner from France?Yesterday saw the screening of Xavier Beauvois's 'Of Gods and Men', a thoughtful work, based on fact, about a group of monks threatened by Islamic fundamentalists in Algeria in 1996. Already some people at the festival are talking about the film as a possible major prizewinner. It's a strong work and would fully deserve a prize.

Read Dave Calhoun's review here

Day Seven

May 18, 2010 – 3pm
Here comes the Frears
Stephen Frears is giving a press conference for his ‘Tamara Drewe’, which my colleague Geoff Andrew has already reviewed . I’m about to see the film at its official screening in an hour’s time.Tamara Drewe.jpgAn American journalist asks Frears why his lead actress Gemma Arterton isn’t at the festival:‘Oh, she’s in New York. God knows why she wants to be there. She’s at the premiere of some film she’s made. It’s called “The Princess and the Pea”, I think?’

Day Seven

May 18, 2010 – 12pm
I like short shorts
Just a quick note that our review of the new review of Stephen Frears's 'Tamara Drewe' is live.

Read Geoff Andrew's review here

Day Seven

May 18, 2010 – 11.30amWaiting for Godard
Everyone was waiting for Godard to turn up yesterday at the screening of his 'Film Socialism', rumoured to be his last film, but nobody was surprised when he didn't show. We had to make do with Michael Haneke who was conspicuously present to watch the film as a punter (he received an honour from the French government at the festival on Sunday).I later read that Godard cancelled his trip to Cannes by sending an inscrutable fax to festival artistic director Thierry Frémaux which included the line 'I will go until death with the festival but I will not take a step more' and referred obliquely to 'problems of the Greek type' which were keeping him at home in Switzerland.I'm resisting reviewing Godard's latest until I see it again – I found this docu-essay utterly inscrutable and not a little aggressive in its refusal to communicate when I saw it yesterday. I suspect that won't change on a second viewing, but until then I'll be giving it the benefit of the doubt.032259.jpgFor now, Ben Kenigsberg – a colleague at Time Out Chicago – offers some interesting initial impressions on the film which you can read here

Day Seven

May 18, 2010 – 10amThe latest cinematic missives from Iran and Chad
There are five more days of screenings to go here at Cannes. You can read my halfway report for a rundown of what’s shown so far at the festival and what’s leading in the race to win the Palme d’Or. Most critics here in Cannes still think that Mike Leigh has a good chance of winning a major prize on Sunday.Read Dave Calhoun’s halfway report. Last night saw the press screening of Abbas Kiarostami’s ‘Certified Copy’. Those who know Kiarostami only from his last two films, ‘Shirin’ and ‘Five’ – formally very experimental works – might be surprised by the light, funny and playful nature of this new film, which he shot on location in Tuscany. A fellow critic described it to me as “‘Before Sunset’ for people with PhDs,” which is a fair reduction of its walking and talking tone as a writer (William Shimell) and a gallery owner (Juliette Binoche) meet in Tuscany and spend several hours together. What I found most appealing was how it manages to be romantic and entertaining and remain a very open work – one that doubtlessly will reward a second viewing. It’s also surprisingly funny, not least during a scene in which the writer Jean-Claude Carrière has a small role.

Read Geoff Andrew’s review here.

A screaming Man.jpgI’ve also posted a review of Mahamat-Saleh Haroun’s ‘A Screaming Man’, which screened over the weekend and remains one of the stronger films in the competition so far.Read Dave Calhoun’s review here.

Day Six

May 17, 2010 – 11am
Biutiful.jpg
Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu's depression session
Mexican director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu is still finding it tough to attain the peaks of excellence he achieved with his ferocious debut feature 'Amores Perros' and its Hollywood follow-up, '21 Grams'. His new movie 'Biutiful', which played in competition, is not the masterpiece that the Croisette rumour mill would've had us believe, but it is an improvement on his overblown, multi-stranded 2006 film, 'Babel'. Javier Bardem, who plays a rapidly deteriorating, Barcelona-based drug dealer delivers a fine performance, but his character remains too inscrutable for emotional dividends to be paid.Read Dave Calhoun's full review here

Day Five

May 16, 2010 – 5pm
Andy (motion) Cap
and Tchaikovsky in 3DI helped out the UK Film Council by hosting a couple of interviews on stage at the British Pavillion over the weekend. First up was ‘Lord of the Rings’ actor Andy Serkis, in town to promote a new performance-capture capture studio in Soho. Serkis arrived at the event on Saturday straight from the airport, having played sax and sung with the remaining Blockheads in Crouch End on Friday night. Then on Sunday came veteran Russian director Andrei Konchalovsky (‘Siberiade’, ‘Runaway Train’), who is in Cannes to plug his new version of ‘The Nutcracker’ in 3D. He revealed that when he was on the Cannes jury in 1978 he faced huge pressure from the festival to give the Palme d’Or to Alan Parker’s ‘Midnight Express’. ‘But we refused because its portrayal of the Turks was so bad. We gave it to Ermanno Olmi’s brilliant “Tree of the Wooden Clogs” instead.’

Watch the interview with Andy Serkis here

There was a conspicuous empty seat for the Iranian director Jafar Panahi (‘Crimson Gold’, ‘Offside’) at the festival on the opening night and last night France's culture minister, Frederic Mitterand, read out a letter from Panahi protesting his innocence. Panahi has been in jail in Iran since March, reportedly in relation to a new film he was preparing. Following his arrest, Cannes invited him to sit on the jury in an attempt to alert the world to his continuing detention.


Day Five

May 16, 2010 – 3pm

A weighty period piece from an old hand
Bertrand Tavernier made his bid for competition gold on Saturday with his unapologetically old-fashioned take on Madame de la Fayette’s novel which – according to Geoff Andrew – worked best when taken in contrast to the leaden historical revisionism showcased in Ridley Scott's 'Robin Hood'.

Tavernier.jpg

Read Geoff Andrew's review here

Day Four

May 15, 2010 – 6pm

Ask a silly question...

Just caught a snatch of a playback from Mike Leigh's press conference this morning. It's playing on loop all over the Palais des Festivals.Leigh refuses to answer a question from a journalist from the Sunday Times - 'You know why,' he says and blanks him.

I'm told the antipathy goes back to a feature the journalist wrote for a paper a few years ago and some details in the story about which Leigh disagreed and threatened to take legal action.

Leigh goes on to pick apart some international journalists' more vague – and sometimes just dumb – questions.

When are you going to make a film about people without any problems, asks one European journalist?

'When I discover those people, I'll make a film about them. The problem-free people in this world don't exist. Everybody, therefore, is interesting.'

Mike Leigh.jpg

The best stupid question comes from an American journalist who asks Leigh why he set the film in spring, autumn and winter and left out summer - despite the word 'summer' flashing up on screen to introduce scenes which include a sunny barbecue.

As Leigh points out: 'Watch it again - and the trick next time is just to look out for the word "summer".'


Day Four

May 15, 2010 – 3pm
The curse of old London town strikes again for Woody
With his recent run of films, Woody Allen has decamped from his native New York to tell his timeworn tales of intellectual neurosis and bourgeois ennui in both London ('Match Point') and Barcelona ('Vicky Cristina Barcelona'). Fresh locations aside, there's still the sense that his restless work rate of one film a year is resulting in a pile up of mediocrity, and so it is with his new film, 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger', a frivolous comedy of relationships among London's high rolling arts set. It stars Naomi Watts and Josh Brolin (among others), and apart from the odd titter, Geoff Andrew was not amused.Read Geoff Andrew's review here

Day Four
May 15, 2010 – 11am

Leigh, Woody and the future of motion capture
Just seen Mike Leigh's new film, 'Another Year, his first since 'Happy-Go-Lucky' - which even now seems to have some people groaning at the very thought of Sally Hawkins's character, Poppy. I met a journalist from the Independent last night who quivered when I mentioned the film. She's wrong, of course.
You Will Meet.jpg
The new Leigh film is more meditative, more calm than some of his work. Ageing and fate are some of its many themes. It's as acute in its observations on our lives as ever.
Off now to see the new Woody Allen - 'You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger' - which is set in London.
Then I'm interviewing Andy Serkis on stage at the UK Film Council's British Pavillion on the beach. He's here to plug a new performance-capture studio he's putting his name to.

Day Three

May 14, 2010 – 2pm
A long-awaited Hollywood sequel, the return of a young master and a London-set J-horror
It’s only mid-afternoon – and already I’ve spent almost seven hours in screening rooms.Oliver Stone’s ‘Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps’ screened this morning. The general reaction in the Lumière, Cannes’s largest cinema, sounded fairly positive, but I thought it was laughably poor, with none of the restraint and black humour that made Stone’s last film, ‘W.’, such an entertaining work. I’ll be posting a full review of the film in a couple of hours’ time.

Read Dave Calhoun' s 'Wall Street' review here

Then there was ‘Aurora’, Romanian director Cristi Puiu’s three-hour follow-up to the excellent ‘The Death of Mr Lazarescu’.My colleague Geoff Andrew has already reviewed the film here. I agree it’s a superb work. What is it with Romanian cinema at the moment? ‘4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days’, ’12:08 East of Bucharest’, ‘Lazarescu’ . . . And yesterday I saw Radu Muntean’s ‘Tuesday, After Christmas’, the 38-year-old director’s follow-up to ‘Boogie’.Like that earlier film, Muntean again shows an interest and brilliance in exploring young marriages and a man’s wandering eye and heart. The story is nothing original – a husband and father is having an affair with a younger woman – but his concentration on dialogue and gesture and behaviour, all played out in impressive and captivating long scenes, is exemplary.Chatroom.jpgAnd I’ve just caught ‘Chatroom’, a London-set film from Japanese director Hideo Nakata (‘The Ring’) and writer Enda Walsh (‘Hunger’). I say ‘London-set’, but what makes this creepy and often very inventive film distinctive is that it’s mostly set on the internet – in chat rooms where five teens, including Aaron Johnson, play out their neuroses and aspirations. It gets a little hysterical, and Nakata is much better with the digital world than the real one, but it’s a good stab at encapsulating the chaos of the net and the fragility of many of the young personalities inhabiting it.

Read Geoff Andrew's review of 'Aurora' here

Day Three

May 14, 2010 – 8.30amGeoff Andrew samples a decent remake of a South Korean classic
Director Im Sang-soo makes his play for competition glory with a remake of Kim Ki-young's classic 1960 psycho drama, 'The Housemaid', about a composer's illicit relationship with the female home help. This new movie skews the meaning of the original, focusing more on inter-class conflict than attempting a full-on, Hitchcockian two-hander.

Read Geoff Andrew's review of the film here

Read Wally Hammond's review of the original here

   

Day Two

May 13, 2010 – 1pmAnother striking missive from Italy's Michael MooreWord before Cannes was that the Italian culture minister was so miffed that the festival was showing comedian/documentary-filmmaker Sabina Guzzanti’s film ‘Draquila – Italy Trembles’ that he stuck two fingers up to Cannes and pulled out of a planned trip to the festival.Now I’ve seen the film (which I hear is already doing good business in Italian cinemas), I’m not surprised. It’s a polemical and credible attack on Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi’s handling and, so Guzzanti argues, cynical exploitation of the earthquake which hit the town of L’Aquila last April, killing 308 people.032488.jpgThere’s a touch of Michael Moore to the film, but although Guzzanti initially turns up in L’Aquila (following Barack Obama, George Clooney and others) wearing a Berlusconi mask, she thankfully slips more into the background for the rest of the film, allowing her interviews and reportage to do the talking. The tone is one of outrage. Guzzanti explains how Berlusconi used the event to boost his own popularity and experiment in the suspension of civil rights and may even have allowed the Civil Protection agency to exploit the disaster commercially via new construction projects (this last bit is now the subject of an official judicial investigation).There are plenty of indignant, angry and despairing voices on screen. But what’s as worrying as the substance of Guzzanti’s accusations are the number of people – victims of the earthquake – prepared to praise Berlusconi to the heavens for her camera. His politics may be suspect, but his charm offensive is disarmingly effective.

Day Two

May 13, 2010 – 11amFrom 'Shanghai Dreams' to ‘Chongqing Blues’Just seen another competition title, ‘Chongqing Blues’ from the Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai.It’s a tender, likeable film about a middle-aged man who returns to the city of Chongqing after 14 years away at sea. He’s returned to find out why his teenage son ended up being shot dead by the police after taking a young woman hostage in a supermarket (a timely story after the recent school shootings in China). His ex-wife doesn’t want to know him, but he begins to reconstruct his absence through conversations with an old friend and with those who knew his son, including the ex-girlfriend who may have triggered his trauma. Flashbacks, too of the events in the supermarket begin to fill in some of the gaps for us.032144.jpgIt’s less of a mystery, or a puzzle, than it sounds, and the real interest is not in discovering what happened in that supermarket (we mostly know that anyway), but in exploring the film’s themes of disconnection and reconnection between people and places, and people and those they’ve known and loved. In the background, too, are ideas about the generation gap in China and a sense of some being left behind by the country’s rapid development – an idea illustrated evocatively by the striking photography of Chongqing in an ever-present blue mist.A solid, good-looking and interesting film – but one which felt slightly cold and academic by the end and not as moving as one might expect.

Day One

May 12, 2010 – 9.30pmMathieu Amalric turns in ‘Tournée’ The first competition film has screened – ‘Tournée’ (‘On Tour’), the third feature to be directed by French actor Mathieu Amalric, probably bestknown globally for his turn as a baddie in ‘Quantum of Solace’ but also a fine performer in films for the likes of Julian Schnabel, Arnaud Desplachin and Alain Resnais.‘Tournée’ is the story of a Parisian theatre producer, played by Amalric, who returns to France after a period of absence with a troupe of female burlesque performers. He takes them on a tour of provincial venues but runs into trouble when trying to secure a theatre for them in Paris, where he has a number of old enemies in the business.Judging by their ease on stage and their names in the cast list (Dirty Martini, Roky Roulette, Kitten on the Keys), these burlesque ladies are the real thing, and there’s a lot of warmth – and breasts – to their performances, even if they come across quite awkwardly like non-actors and there’s a jarring sense of improvisation through much of the film.Overall it’s far too scrappy and freewheeling to come across as the credible portrait of a man on the edge that it wants to be. Amalric is a frenetic, conflicted presence, but the writing and his acting don’t go anywhere near far enough to make you believe his predicament.Tournee.jpg The best scenes are of the burlesque girls themselves, strutting their stuff in port towns like Le Havre and La Rochelle and doing amazing things with giant balloons and nipple tassles and bantering among themselves on trains and in dressing rooms. But I ended up wishing Amalric had kept himself out of it and made a documentary. Read Dave Calhoun's review here.

Day One

May 12, 2010 – 2pm.

The Robin Hood press conference has finished.
In shock news, Cate Blanchett has revealed that 'the chainmail was plastic'. Crowe goes all psychological on his Hood, saying he's 'distressed by the unnecessary suffering of other human beings'. In more important news, Crowe is tipping Spain for the football World Cup and thinks Cristiano Ronaldo is 'a really nice chap'. So there you go. We can only hope someone ask Godard his opinion on the merits of the 4-4-2 formation later in the week.

Day One

May 12, 2010 – Midday

Welcome to Time Out's rolling blog from the Cannes Film Festival.
I'll be updating you on all the films and news from the world's greatest film festival for the next 12 days until Sunday May 23 when Tim Burton’s jury will dish out the Palme d’Or to one of 19 films from around the world - including two films from British directors, Mike Leigh’s ‘Another Year’ and Ken Loach’s ‘Route Irish’.As I write, the madness has already begun. Outside the window, I can see a pack of photographers screaming 'Russell! Russell! Cate! Cate!' in front of a bemused Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett. I've just been in the press screening of Ridley Scott's 'Robin Hood', the film they're here to plug, and the pair will be walking up the festival's red carpet tonight for its world premiere and the festival's opening gala. You can already read my colleague Tom Huddleston's review of 'Robin Hood' here .I agree with Tom. It's moody and good-looking and takes itself deadly seriously - ridiculously seriously at times. I'm not sure Crowe smiles once in the film. He definitely doesn't wear tights. But it's a good-looking medieval romp. Mostly fun, mostly forgettable.Robin 
Hood 3.jpgThe mood at the festival is subdued at the moment. The weather is dull. The festival line-up is best described as unpredictable (see my preview here) as there are many lesser-known and unreliable directors in the official selection. And at dinner last night with other journalists, including my colleague Geoff Andrew and writers from The Times and The Observer, there was a mood of resignation as news finally trickled in from home that David Cameron was, finally, our Prime Minister.No politics here though – just 12 days of reviews from myself and Geoff Andrew of films including Oliver Stone’s ‘Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps’, Woody Allen's ‘You Will Meet a Tall, Dark Stranger’ and Abbas Kiarostami’s ‘Certified Copy’.Personally, I think this could be a Cannes where the festival’s second section, Un Certain Regard, shines. Last year, the Greek film ‘Dogtooth’ was the big winner in that strand. This year, it’s showing new films by some impressive names, including Jean-Luc Godard, Jia Zhangke, Cristi Puiu, Lodge Kerrigan and Pablo Trapero.But will there be a surprise to rival 2007’s ‘4 Month, 3 Weeks, 2 Days’? Or a shock to rival the scissors scene in last year's 'Antichrist'? Will the sun come out? Will Nick Clegg make a surprise appearance on a yacht in the Baie de Cannes?Come back throughout the festival when we'll be updating the blog throughout the day, every day.

Author: Dave Calhoun


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Bond: then and now

Does Skyfall refresh or rehash the James Bond franchise?

Sally Potter interview

Sally Potter interview

The British director explains why 'Ginger and Rosa' is her most mainstream film yet.

Daniel Craig interview

Daniel Craig interview

'I’m almost as in demand as Brad Pitt’