Dhobi Ghat

Film

Drama

Dhobi Ghat.jpg

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Fri Jan 14 2011

When Bollywood A-lister Aamir Khan casually utters ‘fuck’ in English early in this Hindi film, you know this is not your typical ‘masala’ movie. First-time female director Kiran Rao’s (wife of Khan) debut is a delightful delve into the daily lives of ordinary Bombayites. We encounter Arun (Khan), an artist who is jaded with life and seeking inspiration. This divorced loner finds it in the abandoned video diaries he discovers in his new flat: who is the mysterious ‘Yasmin’ (Kriti Malhotra) in the tapes and where is she?
 
Meanwhile, Shai (Monica Dogra), an American NRI (‘Non Resident Indian’) is taking a gap year from her corporate banking job. She dabbles in photography by taking snapshots of life in India’s ‘maximum city’. Then there's Munna (Prateik), a lowly ‘dhobi’ (laundry man), who softens his ‘slumdog’ existence by dreaming of becoming the next Bollywood superstar. He is the link between Arun and Shai. Gradually, an unlikely but believable bond develops between them.

Quirky camera-work and Gustavo Santaolalla’s (‘Brokeback Mountain’) understated score blend seamlessly with the sounds of the Mumbai streets giving us a real flavour of Mumbai life. We are sucked into the daily trials and tribulations of these characters, and the impossibility of a fruitful romantic relationship across the class divide between Shai and Munna is plausibly examined.
 
Rao sensibly avoids any dramatic Bollywood-style confrontations; she lets events speak for themselves. Shai’s middle-class friends find her ‘dhobi-boy’ alliance laughable whilst Munna himself knows and is constantly reminded that boundaries must and cannot be crossed. Rao’s Renoir-type realism, so rare in mainstream Indian cinema, results in an accurate, funny and at times deeply moving portrait of desolate souls in a city and country which may be ‘shining’ but only for a select few. The Ozu-influenced climax, filmed in heavy chaotic Mumbai traffic, is one of the most bittersweet endings I have seen on film in years.
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Release details

UK release:

Fri Jan 21, 2011

Duration:

100 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Kiran Rao

Screenwriter:

Kiran Rao

Cast:

Aamir Khan, Monica Dogra, Prateik

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

4.1 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:3
  • 4 star:3
  • 3 star:1
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|10
1 person listening
annonymous

interesting. different. not your typical bollywood style film. Above average film 6.5/10.

AD

The review paints a very intriguing portrait of this off-beat film from India. It is worth a watch for some of the nuances the writer cleverly teases us with.

GS

This is an absorbing look at the lives of people in the big city of Bombay and it is done very well with a realistic feel to the whole thing.A very different kind of film. Recommended.

Peter

Interesting film. Slow paced but intricate insights into mumbai lives.

Peter

Interesting film. Slow paced but intricate insights into mumbai lives.

Russell

Not an easy film to watch, particularly as it is multi lingual. Solipsism, Invisible barriers and moral vacuums inform this quite beautiful restrained film. Khan is understated, Dogra is quite the revelation.