Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (12A)

Film

Thomas Horn in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Thomas Horn in Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
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Time Out says

Posted: Fri Sep 23 2011

In ‘Billy Elliot’, Stephen Daldry made a film about a boy who faced down reality to find self-fulfilment. The story had its tearjerking moments but earned its happy ending through toughness. Daldry’s sentimental streak broadened with ‘The Hours’ and ‘The Reader’, and now he’s made a film about a boy who, for understandable reasons, seeks to stave off reality, set in a world that, less understandably, colludes in the deception.

Adapted from the novel by Jonathan Safran Foer, ‘Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close’ is about Oskar Schell, an 11-year-old New Yorker whose father (Tom Hanks) is killed at the World Trade Center. A year after the attacks, Oskar remains traumatised, finding comfort in mementos and flights of fantasy – coping mechanisms that converge when he finds a key marked ‘Black’. Determined to find the lock it fits, he starts schlepping around the city, working his way down the Blacks in the phone book. His mother (Sandra Bullock) finds him hard work but his grandmother’s mute lodger (Max von Sydow) is intrigued.

Safran Foer’s novel was a jumble of voices, images and typographical games, dominated by Oskar’s childlike mix of naivety and wishful thinking. It’s a tricky register to translate to film, and Daldry’s reliance on voiceover is unsatisfying. There’s some interesting tension here between the verbal and the audiovisual – the limits and necessity of speech, the vital clamour of the rest. But ‘Extremely Loud…’ ultimately offers a cutesy fantasy of New York and a platitudinous account of trauma and bereavement. Less a film about communication, in the end, than one with its fingers in its ears.

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Release details

Rated:

12A

UK release:

Fri Feb 17, 2012

Duration:

129 mins

Cast and crew

Screenwriter:

Eric Roth, Jonathan Safran Foer

Cast:

Thomas Horn, Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock

Director:

Stephen Daldry

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

3.8 / 5

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LiveReviews|6
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jaycee

Despite a good performance from the child at the centre, this is a hideousl fil, full of whimsical stereotypes and gross sentimentality.It just keeps getting more awful as it goes on. Viola Davis is its only saving grace.

jaycee

Despite a good performance from the child at the centre, this is a hideousl fil, full of whimsical stereotypes and gross sentimentality.It just keeps getting more awful as it goes on. Viola Davis is its only saving grace.

john o sullivan

The hate this film is generating is frightning And its flawed particulary the endings But its a brave attempt to portray an Aspberger/Autistic child struggl;ing to cope with loss. The central performance by Thomas Horn is as good as Clare Danes turn in Temple Graundin which also attempted to play someone on the edge of the autistic spectrum Sure Tom Hanks is too good to be tue but isnt this based on Oskers memories ive seen all 9 best pic noms and this film desreves its place and finishes a distance in front of at least 5 of the other films To quote any oxymoron dramatically real

john o sullivan

The hate this film is generating is frightning And its flawed particulary the endings But its a brave attempt to portray an Aspberger/Autistic child struggl;ing to cope with loss. The central performance by Thomas Horn is as good as Clare Danes turn in Temple Graundin which also attempted to play someone on the edge of the autistic spectrum Sure Tom Hanks is too good to be tue but isnt this based on Oskers memories ive seen all 9 best pic noms and this film desreves its place and finishes a distance in front of at least 5 of the other films To quote any oxymoron dramatically real