I'm a Cyborg (15)

Film

migrate.42168.jpg

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

Tue Apr 1 2008

With its pastel tones, clinical mise-en-scène, a lush, Danny Elfman-style soundtrack and some wild, expressionist characterisations, this could be the sort of film Tim Burton might have made if he had started working out east. Billed by writer-director Park Chan-wook (‘Oldboy’) as something a little lighter after the baroque histrionics of his previous vengeance trilogy, ‘I’m A Cyborg’ is a knowing stab at featherlight whimsy and as intelligent and ornate a piece of work as we might expect from this gifted helmer.

Young-goon (Lim Soo-jung) is a production-line drone who spends her days assembling transistor radios. As the repetitiveness of her work sets in, she starts to believe she is a cyborg, so slices her wrists, then plugs herself into the mains. She is duly packed off to a psychiatric hospital where she courts the attention of Il-soon (Jun Ji-hoon), a young chap who wears a rabbit mask and believes he can assume other people’s identities.

As Park’s ever-agile camera glides majestically though the corridors of this vibrantly-coloured ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’, the pair try to assist each other through testing times in a film which, though lacking an overall narrative sweep, delivers moments of humour, tenderness and eccentric beauty. And yet, nestled beneath the directorial flights-of-fancy (a dream sequence where Young-goon opens fire on the nurses is a deadpan classic) is a touching fable about the fallibility of the human ‘machine’, how little it takes for it to break down, and the cost of getting it fixed up again. After a rousing, melodramatic finale, a superfluous 15-minute coda almost spoils the show.
0

Reviews

Add +

Release details

Rated:

15

UK release:

Fri Apr 4, 2008

Duration:

107 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Park Chan-Wook

Screenwriter:

Park Chan-Wook

Cast:

Lim Su-jeong, Choi Hie-jin, Kim Byeong-ok, Jung Ji-hoon

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

4.6 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:2
  • 4 star:1
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|10
1 person listening
Technoguy

There's something about the far east and a compatibility with new technology.Here both Park's treating the new HD camera sysytem of filming like a new toy,also the subject matter:being a Cyborg,talking to machines as if they're human,receiving instructions from the radio.He has taken the logic of technology and married it up to extreme mental states of psychosis and created this interesting hybrid.There was both the whimsy of the Wizard of Oz and the underlying vengeance motif common to his trilogy when his 'cyborg',Young-goon turns in her dream into a killing machine wiping away the'white coats' who'd stolen her grand mother away.She meets Il-soon the young man who thieves people's identities and they fall in love therapeutically. Some of the scenes show great ingenuity and there are moments of great beauty and tenderness.The acting is very moving,the cinematography is brilliant.There are moments that are not always clear which may require a second viewing but stick with it and see a radical cinema.

Technoguy

There's something about the far east and a compatibility with new technology.Here both Park's treating the new HD camera sysytem of filming like a new toy,also the subject matter:being a Cyborg,talking to machines as if they're human,receiving instructions from the radio.He has taken the logic of technology and married it up to extreme mental states of psychosis and created this interesting hybrid.There was both the whimsy of the Wizard of Oz and the underlying vengeance motif common to his trilogy when his 'cyborg',Young-goon turns in her dream into a killing machine wiping away the'white coats' who'd stolen her grand mother away.She meets Il-soon the young man who thieves people's identities and they fall in love therapeutically. Some of the scenes show great ingenuity and there are moments of great beauty and tenderness.The acting is very moving,the cinematography is brilliant.There are moments that are not always clear which may require a second viewing but stick with it and see a radical cinema.

Nick

Loved Oldboy? This whimsical offering is likely to be a disappointment. There are moments of brilliance, beauty and inspiration, but as a whole this is meandering and indulgent, lacking in any real insight or characterisation. The caricature pre-PC inmates at the asylum are both annoying and awkward, and the only real sensation at the end of the movie was relief - that it had finally come to an end.

Nick

Loved Oldboy? This whimsical offering is likely to be a disappointment. There are moments of brilliance, beauty and inspiration, but as a whole this is meandering and indulgent, lacking in any real insight or characterisation. The caricature pre-PC inmates at the asylum are both annoying and awkward, and the only real sensation at the end of the movie was relief - that it had finally come to an end.

ben

very poor. the story is complete nonsense despite the visual flair.

ben

very poor. the story is complete nonsense despite the visual flair.

Gina

A different kind of film for Park, but very clever and creative. The production design is impressive, and it was a pleasure to watch. One can get lost in the film and not realize they are in a movie theatre for two hours. Definitely worth viewing.

Gina

A different kind of film for Park, but very clever and creative. The production design is impressive, and it was a pleasure to watch. One can get lost in the film and not realize they are in a movie theatre for two hours. Definitely worth viewing.

Arnaud

I saw this film last November at the Barbican, it was the closing film of their Korean Film Festival. This film created such a good feeling within myself that I felt like smiling for the next few days non-stop! Amazing colours, music, acting, very funny, but as well touching and moving, Park Chan Wook managed the transition from violence rather weel, even though he hasn't lost his talent for sharp cinematography. Must be seen !

Arnaud

I saw this film last November at the Barbican, it was the closing film of their Korean Film Festival. This film created such a good feeling within myself that I felt like smiling for the next few days non-stop! Amazing colours, music, acting, very funny, but as well touching and moving, Park Chan Wook managed the transition from violence rather weel, even though he hasn't lost his talent for sharp cinematography. Must be seen !