Kathryn Bigelow: interview

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Kathryn Bigelow discusses 'The Hurt Locker', the film that's being called the best fiction film on the Iraq war

In the early 1990s, Kathryn Bigelow was hailed as the first female director to cross the threshold of mainstream Hollywood with films like ‘Near Dark’ and ‘Point Break’. Though her 2000s have so far been fairly quiet with films like ‘K-19: The Widowmaker’, her new film, ‘The Hurt Locker’, about the dangerous routines of bomb disposal experts (or ‘explosive ordnance disposal operators’ – EODs) in Iraq, is arguably also her best.

The film has been released in the US where it received superb reviews. Do you enjoy reading critics of your films?
‘Well, certainly these I have! I’ve read them and memorised them. No, only kidding. It’s incredibly gratifying to see that sort of enthusiasm for the film.’

The Hurt Locker’ is set in Baghdad during the Iraq conflict. Are you a fan of films like ‘Lions for Lambs’, ‘In the Valley of Elah’ and ‘Battle for Haditha’ that offer fictional accounts of war?

‘To be honest, I’ve been immersed in this for so long – we started on it in 2005 – that I made a decision not to see how other directors dealt with the conflict. What I wanted to do with “The Hurt Locker” was try and offer a realistic and accurate war movie based on a journalistic source rather than using classified military material.’

When did you first come in contact with the film’s writer, Mark Boal?
‘I love reportage journalism, and was a big fan of a lot of the writing Mark had done. We met just before his embed with an EOD unit in Baghdad, and when he came back, we started talking about his experiences with characters and, I think it occurred to us simultaneously, that this would be an interesting departure point for a film.’

With the EODs, if feels like these fascinating, unheralded characters have been unearthed.
‘These men are like surgeons. When you’re invited into EOD, you’ve proved you have an incredible motor dexterity and engineering acumen. You’ve got to be able to look at a nest of wires and make a call in seconds. If you’re out there for too long, the enemy will shoot you. Unlike a surgeon, though, if they make a mistake, the patient dies – if you make a mistake, you die.’

The film strikes a good balance between action and character.
‘On one hand, I feel that EODs arguably have the most dangerous job in the world. Yet in the US, it’s an all-volunteer military, so you’re then offered a very interesting psychological angle to deal with. What does it take to walk towards something that I imagine you and I would be running from?’

Jeremy Renner’s gung-ho Sergeant James is the film’s key character. When you cast the movie, what qualities were you looking for ?
‘First and foremost I was looking for a brilliant actor, as most filmmakers do, I hope! I’d seen him in the film “Dahmer”, and even though his character is different from that film, the truth and honesty in the performance were there. I sent him the script, he was in London at the time shooting “28 Weeks Later… ”, we spent a few hours on the phone and then I knew I was speaking to Sgt James. I cast him and we hadn’t even met.’

Was Sgt James based on a real person?
‘It’s all at the end of the day a work of fiction, but I know that Mark was inspired by people he spent time with that have aspects of Renner’s character. You get the bravado and swagger, but also the tenderness.’

You choose to keep an emotional distance from the Iraqi locals. Why?
‘This is a film told from the specific point of view of the US solders. Mark was there with the troops and the representation of the Iraqi insurgents is merely one man’s honest description of the situation. I’m sure it’s different now, but at the time when he went out, one of the big frustrations was the impossibility of communication. There were no language skills and not enough interpreters for everybody to use.

‘Certainly this is conjecture on my part, but this would have added to a real sense of isolation, confusion and, let’s be honest, a large element of threat. For lack of a better way to describe it, I feel this conflict has been very abstract, in that we think of war as having a front and rear, as maybe being fought in a field or in a jungle, but never in a densely populated urban setting. It’s the idea that there is no safe zone. Everywhere is volatile all the time.’

'The Hurt Locker'   is released on August 28.

Author: Interview: David Jenkins



Users say

3 comments
Boa credtica, mas sf3 queria fazer uma ovbresae7e3
Boa credtica, mas sf3 queria fazer uma ovbresae7e3

Boa credtica, mas sf3 queria fazer uma ovbresae7e3o: o filme foi lane7ado aqui no Brasil antes de ser lane7ado nos cinemas dos eua..Ente3o f5 lane7amento em dvd no brasil ne3o foi por causa da baixa bilheteria... foi apenas uma escolha infeliz da produtora.

I echoe your sentiments about  Avatar    oluhatgh
I echoe your sentiments about Avatar oluhatgh

I echoe your sentiments about Avatar oluhatgh I really, really wanted Tarantino to win, there's something supremely satisfying about Bigelow becoming the first woman to take the award. Plus, the person she took it from is James Cameron, creator of the technically amazing but not-so-original Avatar. Don't get me wrong I'm all for blockbusters being included in the Oscar hunt, but only if they DESERVE it.

Kyliemo
Kyliemo

Loved the Hurt Locker, thought Jeremy Renner was inspired casting. An utterly engrossing war movie, with some incredible, tense set pieces and beautifully realised small moments about humanity, both its incredible generosity and its flaws, etc. I think the debate about Kathryn Bigelow being a woman director in a big boy's game is irrelevant, let's just get on with the business of watching her work. Gave the film a 9.15 out of 10 because ultimately, much as this is being touted as a documentary-style piece, and Oscar worthy, for me it fell a little bit at the final hurdle. The film is kind of a two-headed beast, can't quite assert itself as either a hard-hitting drama or action piece. While it has much to say, and brilliantly, about men and war, Bigelow at times can't help but stray into action hero sequence territory, slipping in some Pointbreak-style moments, that rather lets it down for me. It's a subtle bit of slippage, but there nonetheless, which kept it from being a wholly coherent and satisfying film for me, and it is for this reason that I think Bigelow will be denied big Oscar recognition this time around.



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