London Film Festival top picks: ‘Cult’

Time Out's critics select five films to look out for in the London Film Festival's ‘Cult’ strand

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Showcasing all those gnarly oddities that don’t fit neatly into the other generic strands, this is where the real weird stuff hides out. Highlights include the long-awaited follow-up to a modern cartoon classic, a doc on the greatest lost sci-fi flick of all time and the latest film from one of cinema’s true visionaries, Terry Gilliam.

  • All Cheerleader's Die

    It’s the tale of a high school outsider who recruits the local cheerleading squad to help her get revenge on the football team, but ends up abandoning her plans when supernatural happenings intervene. As much a black comedy as a straight-up slasher flick, this looks like a joyously fun take on old-fashioned ideas.

    Read more about ‘All Cheerleaders Die’

    All Cheerleader's Die
  • The Congress

    ‘The Congress’ mixes live action and animation in a film about an actress (Robin Wright) with a disabled son who – for a huge fee – undergoes body imaging to create a digital actress. As part of the contract, the studio owns all rights to control her image and she agrees never to act again.

    Read more about ‘The Congress’

    The Congress
  • Jodorowsky's Dune

    This documentary explores how writer-director-mystic Alejandro Jodorowsky’s adaptation of Frank Herbert’s epic sci-fi masterpiece ‘Dune’ might have turned out if it hadn't fallen apart.

    Read more about ‘Jodorowsky's Dune’

    Jodorowsky's Dune
  • The Sacrament

    The tale of a pair of hipster magazine journalists who set out to expose the shady doings of a remote religious community, it’s got ‘eerie but insightful’ written all over it. As an added bonus, the lead role is played by puppy-faced mumblecore icon Joe Swanberg.

    Read more about ‘The Sacrament’

    The Sacrament
  • The Zero Theorem

    Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Zero Theorem’ is a lo-fi, future-tech farce with an air of high-end cyber panto. The stars still come out for the director of ‘Brazil’, and a totally bald Christoph Waltz (‘Django Unchained’) features in every scene as Qohen Leth, an IT drone who’s lost his soul and maybe his mind.

    Read more about ‘The Zero Theorem’

    The Zero Theorem

All Cheerleader's Die

It’s the tale of a high school outsider who recruits the local cheerleading squad to help her get revenge on the football team, but ends up abandoning her plans when supernatural happenings intervene. As much a black comedy as a straight-up slasher flick, this looks like a joyously fun take on old-fashioned ideas.

Read more about ‘All Cheerleaders Die’

London Film Festival guide

The 57th BFI London Film Festival kicks off in venues across the city on October 9 2013, screening films from every corner of the globe, from major blockbusters to experimental oddities. There will be star-studded red-carpet galas, hundreds of new features and shorts, plus talks, discussions and workshops – and all of it is open to the public. See our London Film Festival guide to find out how to make the most of it.

See our guide to the London Film Festival

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