Mrs Pollifax – Spy

Film

Comedy

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5
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Time Out says

Witless, worthless spy comedy about a middle-aged matron's enlistment in the CIA. Martinson, a long-time TV series toiler who'd provided the drive-in market in the '50s with such treats as Hot Rod Girl and Hot Rod Rumble, had recently had his head turned by the unaccustomed success of the big-screen Batman and similar spy-spoof material in the Raquel Welch-starring Fathom. Ros Russell, pseudonymously scripting as well as starring, was old enough to have known better, but did the honourable thing and retired immediately after.
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Release details

UK release:

1970

Duration:

110 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5
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Frank R.

The always-underrated Rosalind Russell's final theatrical film is the perfect "little movie" to watch in the comfort of home, preferably on a nice big screen to enjoy the wonderful animated opening credits (titles by Don Record). Under the capable hands of frequent TV and sometime film director Leslie Martinson ("PT 109", and 1996's campy "Batman"), the story sails along at an even pace (though the setting is dreary and claustrophobic, which may cause some to lose interest). It also makes textbook use of what Alfred Hitcock famously referred to as a "McGuffin" (that one thing in a suspense film everyone wants, no matter what it is). The chemistry between Russell and Darren McGavin is reminiscent of William Powell and Myrna Loy. And while this may not quite be on the level of "The Thin Man" movies, it certainly comes as closer than anything else released in 1971 ever would. It's like getting the nostalgia of two eras for the price of one viewing. Before TCM's August 2007 airing of this film, few reviews were available in cyberland, and the ones that could be found weren't very positive. Well, it looks like the previous reviewers may now be in the minority, since the majority of viewers of that airing seem to have enjoyed it. Somwhere screenwriter "C.A. McKnight" (Russell herself) must be smiling!

Frank R.

The always-underrated Rosalind Russell's final theatrical film is the perfect "little movie" to watch in the comfort of home, preferably on a nice big screen to enjoy the wonderful animated opening credits (titles by Don Record). Under the capable hands of frequent TV and sometime film director Leslie Martinson ("PT 109", and 1996's campy "Batman"), the story sails along at an even pace (though the setting is dreary and claustrophobic, which may cause some to lose interest). It also makes textbook use of what Alfred Hitcock famously referred to as a "McGuffin" (that one thing in a suspense film everyone wants, no matter what it is). The chemistry between Russell and Darren McGavin is reminiscent of William Powell and Myrna Loy. And while this may not quite be on the level of "The Thin Man" movies, it certainly comes as closer than anything else released in 1971 ever would. It's like getting the nostalgia of two eras for the price of one viewing. Before TCM's August 2007 airing of this film, few reviews were available in cyberland, and the ones that could be found weren't very positive. Well, it looks like the previous reviewers may now be in the minority, since the majority of viewers of that airing seem to have enjoyed it. Somwhere screenwriter "C.A. McKnight" (Russell herself) must be smiling!