One True Thing

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Not quite a weepy despite its drippy score and feel-good ending, this adaptation of Anna Quindlen's novel is less about bereavement than the preliminaries thereto. Its theme is the sheer inconvenience which a dying family member, no matter how loved, represents. When it becomes clear that Mother (Streep) has terminal cancer, her son seems to fade from the scene, her college professor husband clings stubbornly to his routine, and it's left to the daughter (Zellweger) to put her life on hold for the duration. The script shifts audience sympathies about quite adroitly, though it's a pity all the men had to be such humbugs. Franklin's lyrical evocation of small town life and Streep's lavishly mannered performance disrupt the project in not uninteresting ways.
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Release details

UK release:

1998

Duration:

127 mins

Cast and crew

Director:

Carl Franklin

Cast:

Lauren Graham, Tom Everett Scott, William Hurt, Renée Zellweger, Meryl Streep, Nicky Katt

Music:

Cliff Edelman

Production Designer:

Paul Peters

Editor:

Carole Kravetz

Cinematography:

Declan Quinn

Screenwriter:

Karen Croner

Producer:

Jesse Beaton, Harry Ufland

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Average User Rating

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LiveReviews|2
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Perry Littleboy

The film is beautifully crafted, with Zellweger, Hurt and Everett Scott all acting consumately, but it is Meryl Streep who steals the film. It is her every nuanced gesture and facial expression that stays in the mind. The script writing is worthy of an Oscar, with one scene, Streep's "Don't shush me... everyone is shushing me" that is one of the most poetic soliloquies I have seen on film.

Perry Littleboy

The film is beautifully crafted, with Zellweger, Hurt and Everett Scott all acting consumately, but it is Meryl Streep who steals the film. It is her every nuanced gesture and facial expression that stays in the mind. The script writing is worthy of an Oscar, with one scene, Streep's "Don't shush me... everyone is shushing me" that is one of the most poetic soliloquies I have seen on film.