Padre Padrone

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

A Sardinian shepherd manages to free himself from his family, educate himself, then return home to fight an overdue battle with the figure who oppressed him, his father. Padre Padrone is a terrific subject, a true story that illuminates a universal problem: how can one man make a positive stand against his own patriarchal society? The boy's acquisition of language is a key factor, and the film's triumph is that it actualises this in an extraordinarily emotive way: after a consciously theatrical introduction, it presents fragments of experience (landscape, sounds, routines) which cohere into a vision of nature and human society as the boy matures.
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Release details

UK release:

1977

Duration:

113 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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LiveReviews|2
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lisa  guss

My thoughts revolve around the cruelty of the men, the undying hatreds passed from generation to generation, the total absence of compassion reflected even in the way they kill their lambs and treat their dogs. This film echos another Sardinian film about a boy who befriends another boy being held for ransom and hidden in a dugout by his father and other men of the village. Poverty, hunger and desperation seem to have brutalized the men of Sardinia yet the same boy who kills a lamb in the blink of an eye to exchange for an accordion can emerge from this darkness with the sensibilities of a poet. How can so astounding a transformation come about? How often does it happen? Ledda must have been exceptional from the start.

lisa  guss

My thoughts revolve around the cruelty of the men, the undying hatreds passed from generation to generation, the total absence of compassion reflected even in the way they kill their lambs and treat their dogs. This film echos another Sardinian film about a boy who befriends another boy being held for ransom and hidden in a dugout by his father and other men of the village. Poverty, hunger and desperation seem to have brutalized the men of Sardinia yet the same boy who kills a lamb in the blink of an eye to exchange for an accordion can emerge from this darkness with the sensibilities of a poet. How can so astounding a transformation come about? How often does it happen? Ledda must have been exceptional from the start.