Perrier's Bounty

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Unlike its cockney equivalent, the Irish gangster movie – however hackneyed its storyline – can usually be relied upon to deliver a modicum of wit and flair. ‘Perrier’s Bounty’ is a prime example: it marries a predictable plot – Cillian Murphy owes money to some bad fellas, complications ensue – with a goodly portion of smart banter, off-kilter characterisation and knockabout violence.

The film is flawlessly cast, with Murphy’s put-upon hero ably backed by Jim Broadbent as his world-weary Pa and Jodie Whitaker as the emotionally compromised woman in his life, while a monstrous, towering Brendan Gleeson lords over proceedings as the titular crime bigwig. They bring a sense of playfulness and pathos to the project that probably wasn’t there in the busy, amateurish script, stuffed as it is with twists, switchbacks and gangland clichés. Ian Fitzgibbon’s direction is a little flat and uninspiring and the urban photography is unnecessarily gritty and downbeat. But despite these setbacks, ‘Perrier’s Bounty’ is still a pleasure to watch: not exactly memorable, but packed with enough intellect, incident and strong performances to justify the investment.

Release details

Rated: 15
Release date: Friday March 26 2010
Duration: 88 mins

Cast and crew

Director: Ian McNeice
Screenwriter: Ian McNeice
Cast: Cillian Murphy
Brendan Gleeson
Jim Broadbent
Jodie Whittaker

Average User Rating

1.9 / 5

Rating Breakdown

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LiveReviews|4
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John Cooper

Tom Huddleston's review is surprisingly accurate,and those suspicious of his film assessments can be reassured. One is continually reminded, that the Irish, , despite being the worst dressed nation in Europe, and the most susceptible to the lure of alcohol, have an endearing facility in the use of poetic language and a heartwarming lack of pretentiousness ( a quality totally lacking in the Time Out Editorial team ) Shot on a small budget . .. the main expenses being one burnt out car and Brendan Gleeson's gangster coat . the one sartorial highlight of the costume budget. . . Worth seeing . despite a couple of forays into Irish metaphysics

John Cooper

Tom Huddleston's review is surprisingly accurate,and those suspicious of his film assessments can be reassured. One is continually reminded, that the Irish, , despite being the worst dressed nation in Europe, and the most susceptible to the lure of alcohol, have an endearing facility in the use of poetic language and a heartwarming lack of pretentiousness ( a quality totally lacking in the Time Out Editorial team ) Shot on a small budget . .. the main expenses being one burnt out car and Brendan Gleeson's gangster coat . the one sartorial highlight of the costume budget. . . Worth seeing . despite a couple of forays into Irish metaphysics

philmk

Amateurish script, gangland clichés, is right. The humour isn't sufficient to detract from its failings. In spite of the acting talent, it's only memorable for being set in Dublin. Disappointing.

philmk

Amateurish script, gangland clichés, is right. The humour isn't sufficient to detract from its failings. In spite of the acting talent, it's only memorable for being set in Dublin. Disappointing.