Peter Pan

Film

Animation

Peter Pan (1953)

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

Having annoyed Carroll purists in 1951 with his cartoon version of Alice in Wonderland, Disney went on to exasperate Barrie fans by using American boy star Bobby Driscoll's voice for Peter Pan, modelling the usually unseen Tinkerbell on Marilyn Monroe, and employing the Sammys Cahn and Fain to compose songs like 'What Makes the Red Man Red'. If you can view it without thinking of Disney fucking about with yet another children's classic and relax in the studio's last decent use of Technicolor, then you're in for a treat.

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:1
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|2
1 person listening
Michael O&#039;Farrell

While it doesn't reach the artistic heights of Disney's early animated features "Peter Pan" nevertheless is a milestone in the Disney canon, a technically superb work of hand drawn animation that reaches its greatest height in the flying sequences. Peter, Wendy, John and Michael flying over night time Edwardian London is a tour de force, the dexterity and suppleness with which the Disney artists render the characters in flight has rarely been equalled in cartoons since (apologies to Pixar). Starting with "Cinderella", then" Alice In Woderland" and later "Lady And the Tramp' and Sleeping Beauty", these 1950s films are second tier in terms of background detail and overall inspiration but the animation remains superlative and these 50s films are all classics of a kind.

Michael O&#039;Farrell

While it doesn't reach the artistic heights of Disney's early animated features "Peter Pan" nevertheless is a milestone in the Disney canon, a technically superb work of hand drawn animation that reaches its greatest height in the flying sequences. Peter, Wendy, John and Michael flying over night time Edwardian London is a tour de force, the dexterity and suppleness with which the Disney artists render the characters in flight has rarely been equalled in cartoons since (apologies to Pixar). Starting with "Cinderella", then" Alice In Woderland" and later "Lady And the Tramp' and Sleeping Beauty", these 1950s films are second tier in terms of background detail and overall inspiration but the animation remains superlative and these 50s films are all classics of a kind.