Roman de Gare

Film

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Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Feb 10 2009

Clever-clever French stalwart Claude Lelouch chose to shoot his latest under a pseudonym (only revealing himself later on) because he felt humiliated by the failure of his previous film. It’s a shame, then, that from such intriguing origins arrives a fairly ordinary Hitchcockian mystery thriller about authorship and identity. The film works best as a showcase for rumple-faced actor Dominique Pinon (best known for his role in ‘Delicatessen’), shrewdly cast as a genial oddball who could be a serial killer, a magician or the ghost writer for a bestselling author (Fanny Ardant). The ball starts rolling when he picks up a jilted hairdresser from a motorway lay-by and agrees to pretend to be her husband. To disclose any more would reduce the fun of negotiating the criss-crossing timeframes, backstories and expertly mounted decoys, all of which Lelouch handles with a proficiency that reflects his 50 years in the game. But, tension and plausibility fritter away in the final third.
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Release details

Cast and crew

Director:

Claude Lelouch

Cast:

Dominique Pinon, Fanny Ardant, Audrey Dana

Users say

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Average User Rating

5 / 5

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LiveReviews|2
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MYSTIC

The French have always adored good mysteries, and this does not disappoint. A word of advice: Pay constant attention: It's like a jigsaw puzzle but the pieces only fit at the end as it should.Like any perfect crime of say Patricia Highsmith, this constantly unpredictable series of plots keeps changing just when you thought you had figured things out. I found it it brilliant, implausible one minute and mystefying the next. It's also loaded with atmosphere, red herrings, compellingly acted and directed by Lelouche, just as satisfying as "Purple Noon".

MYSTIC

The French have always adored good mysteries, and this does not disappoint. A word of advice: Pay constant attention: It's like a jigsaw puzzle but the pieces only fit at the end as it should.Like any perfect crime of say Patricia Highsmith, this constantly unpredictable series of plots keeps changing just when you thought you had figured things out. I found it it brilliant, implausible one minute and mystefying the next. It's also loaded with atmosphere, red herrings, compellingly acted and directed by Lelouche, just as satisfying as "Purple Noon".