Seven Men from Now

Film

Westerns

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Neither as bleak nor as concise as the greatest collaborations between Scott and Boetticher (The Tall T, Ride Lonesome, Comanche Station), their first outing together nevertheless remains a terrific B Western. Scott is beautifully assured as Ben Stride, vengefully hunting down the men who killed his wife during a robbery, while Larch and (most especially) Marvin are memorable as the outlaws he encounters out in the desert, keen to get their hands on a gold shipment secretly being carried by a couple from back east. Burt Kennedy's script is characteristically terse and witty, William Clothier's camerawork sharp and direct, and Boetticher's direction a model of inventive economy.
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Release details

UK release:

1956

Duration:

78 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5
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Wild Bill Harding

This superlative little movie shows what can be done with a script that carries not an ounce of fat. The cast is beyond superb, each one carrying his or her sadness and regret deep in the soul. Performers in a Budd Boetticher movie convey more in a glance than others do in a page of dialogue. Randolph Scott looks like one of the weathered rocks in Lone Pine's Alabama Hills. If one compares Boetticher's greatest films - Seven Men From Now, Ride Lonesome, The Tall T and Comanche Station with John Ford's west, Ford comes out looking overblown and hysterical. Just look at the knockabout silliness in The Searchers if you don't know what I mean!

Wild Bill Harding

This superlative little movie shows what can be done with a script that carries not an ounce of fat. The cast is beyond superb, each one carrying his or her sadness and regret deep in the soul. Performers in a Budd Boetticher movie convey more in a glance than others do in a page of dialogue. Randolph Scott looks like one of the weathered rocks in Lone Pine's Alabama Hills. If one compares Boetticher's greatest films - Seven Men From Now, Ride Lonesome, The Tall T and Comanche Station with John Ford's west, Ford comes out looking overblown and hysterical. Just look at the knockabout silliness in The Searchers if you don't know what I mean!