Tender Mercies

Film , Drama
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 out of 5 stars
(2 user reviews)
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Tender Mercies

Alongside works by Terrence Malick, John Cassavetes and John Huston, this breathtaking 1983 melodrama is one of the wellsprings of US indie cinema. Writer Horton Foote – most famous for scripting ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ – and his star Robert Duvall shopped the screenplay to every major American director, but ended up having to settle for Aussie Bruce Beresford making his first Hollywood film.

It’s a bizarre trio – the respected playwright, the not-quite-bankable star, the Ocker sex-comedy veteran – especially when one considers that the film they came up with – all downhome reverence, stifled emotion and expressive minimalism – stands completely alone in each man’s CV (at least until Duvall co-starred in virtual remake ‘Crazy Heart’).

Duvall plays Mac Sledge – greatest character name ever? – the strung-out former country star who washes up in a remote Texas town and shacks up with the local widow. Redemption stories are ten to the dozen in Hollywood, but this one feels heartbreakingly genuine – Duvall was never better, and that’s saying something.

The look of the film is entrancing, from a series of disconcertingly flat rural landscapes to the gorgeous photography of human faces – head on, eyes wide, nothing hidden. It’s a film of quiet, relentless power which demands – and rewards – a level of belief, even faith in its characters which few other films even dare to suggest. For all its simplicity, this is bold, heartfelt filmmaking. A masterpiece.

Release details

Duration: 92 mins

Cast and crew

Director: Bruce Beresford
Screenwriter: Horton Foote
Cast: Robert Duvall
Tess Harper
Betty Buckley
Wilford Brimley
Ellen Barkin
Allan Hubbard
LiveReviews|2
1 person listening
Margaret

Yes, beautiful.; and yes, it grips from start to finish and long afterward. As John Simon titled his National Review Mag. review: "Merciful heavens, a real film". (If you can find that review, do!) Of all the movies I've seen in my 70+ years, I think of this one most often.

Margaret

Yes, beautiful.; and yes, it grips from start to finish and long afterward. As John Simon titled his National Review Mag. review: "Merciful heavens, a real film". (If you can find that review, do!) Of all the movies I've seen in my 70+ years, I think of this one most often.