The 100 best horror films - contributors G-H

View the top ten lists of horror films chosen by the likes of Drew Goddard and Robin Hardy

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Matt Glasby

Matt Glasby is a critic for Total Film magazine.

Matt Glasby's top ten
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
The Orphanage (JA Bayona, 2007)
Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)
The Descent (Neil Marshall, 2005)
The Fly (David Cronenberg, 1986)
The Others (Alejandro Amenábar, 2001)
Ring (Ringu) (Hideo Nakata, 1998)
The Blair Witch Project (Daniel Myrick, Eduardo Sánchez, 1999)
Carrie (Brian De Palma, 1976)
Lake Mungo (Joel Anderson, 2008)

‘The first 15 minutes of “Suspiria” might be the purest horror sequence ever filmed. Argento is only trying to scare us – nothing more – and he succeeds with tornado finesse. Neil Marshall directed the hell out of “The Descent”, but the key is that the cave setting would be scary even it weren’t full of rampaging, kill-crazy man beasts. which it is. The mundane-seeming Aussie mock-doc “Lake Mungo” has much to say about the bereaved’s need to believe, plus it’s spooky as hell.’


Jonathan Glendening

Jonathan Glendening is the writer-director behind homegrown comedy-horror ‘Strippers vs Werewolves’, which stars Robert Englund and Steven Berkoff. His others films include ‘Summer Rain’, ‘13 Hrs’ and the forthcoming ‘Night Wolf’.

Jonathan Glendening's top ten
Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975)
Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979)
The Omen (Richard Donner, 1976)
An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
Se7en (David Fincher, 1995)
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
The Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme, 1990)
28 Days Later (Danny Boyle, 2002)
A Nightmare on Elm Street (Wes Craven, 1984)


Drew Goddard

Drew Goddard is the co-writer and director of ‘The Cabin in the Woods’, the most insanely inventive and wildly entertaining horror movie in recent memory. He also wrote ‘Cloverfield’, and worked on both ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ and ‘Angel’ with Joss Whedon.

Drew Goddard's top ten
The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)
Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979)
The Evil Dead (Sam Raimi, 1981)
Dawn of the Dead (George A Romero, 1978)
The Descent (Neil Marshall, 2005)
Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)
Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)
Hellraiser (Clive Barker, 1987)
The Strangers (Bryan Bertino, 2008)
Shaun of the Dead (Edgar Wright, 2004)


The Gothique Film Society (list by Dave Simpson)

The Gothique Film Society in Holborn is currently enjoyings its 46th season. Started in 1967 (Bob Monkhouse was honorary president in the ’70s) the society meets monthly to screen double bills of horror classics.

The Gothique Film Society top ten
The Old Dark House (James Whale, 1932)
The Invisible Man (James Whale 1933)
Mad Love (Karl Freund, 1935)
Bride of Frankenstein (James Whale, 1935)
The Phantom of the Opera (Arthur Lubin, 1942)
The Picture of Dorian Grey (Albert Lewin, 1945)
Eyes Without a Face (Georges Franju, 1959)
Night of the Living Dead (George A Romero, 1968)
Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (Terence Fisher, 1969)
The Wicker Man (Robin Hardy, 1973)


Jamie Graham

Jamie Graham is deputy editor of Total Film magazine.

Jamie Graham's top ten
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Persona (Ingmar Bergman, 1966)
Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)
Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)
Night of the Living Dead (George A Romero, 1968)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
The Blair Witch Project (Daniel Myrick, Eduardo Sánchez, 1999)
Bride of Frankenstein (James Whale, 1935)
I Walked with a Zombie (Jacques Tourneur, 1943)

Kill, Baby… Kill! (aka Operazione Paura, Curse of the Dead) (Mario Bava, 1966)
‘An impossible task! It pains me to exclude titles by Polanski, Cronenberg, Corman, Dreyer, Weir, Lynch, De Palma, Browning, Avati, etc, and it seems ludicrous to not find room for Hammer, Tigon, Amicus or, indeed, a single UK entry – our horror heritage is gloriously rich, and “Peeping Tom”, “The Wicker Man”, “Don’t Look Now”, “The Innocents”, “Witchfinder General”, “Night Of The Demon”, “Theatre Of Blood”, “Whistle And I’ll Come To You”, “Penda’s Fen”, “The Curse Of Frankenstein” and “Dracula” all come close. One final note: the list above consists of copper-bottomed classics. But a compilation of the underseen and underappreciated might make for more interesting reading.’


Jorge Michel Grau

Mexican director Jorge Michel Grau’s first feature, the creepy, slow-burning cannibal tale ‘We Are What We Are’ premiered in the Directors’ Fortnight strand at Cannes in 2010.

Jorge Michel Grau's top ten
Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)
The Exorcist (William Friedkin, 1973)
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Cronos (Guillermo del Toro, 1993)
Night of the Living Dead (George A Romero, 1968)
Skeleton of Mrs Morales (Rogelio A González, 1960)
Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1977)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
Cat People (Jacques Tourneur, 1942)
Alucarda (Juan López Moctezuma, 1978)

‘It was a very difficult task to choose only 10 movies. I felt as if I was in a pet shop and was leaving behind 6 little puppies that watched me with sad and nostalgic eyes. The truth is that I owe them what I am now. Because of this I put my list of 10 in order, and kept 6 small “puppies” with whom I’m emotionally compromised, knowing that you won’t take them into account, but it makes me feel less guilty: “Black Sunday”, “Battle Royale”, “Martyrs”, “Taxidermia”, “Cold Fish” and “Hellraiser”.’


Adam Green

Adam Green has been the lead singer in a metal band and a DJ, but is now better known as the writer and director of ‘Hatchet’ and ‘Frozen’. He is currently working on ‘Killer Pizza’, a coming-of-age comedy produced by Chris Columbus.

Adam Green's top ten
An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
The Exorcist (William Friedkin, 1973)
Trick 'r Treat (Michael Dougherty, 2007)
The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)
Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)
A Nightmare on Elm Street (Wes Craven, 1984)
Evil Dead II (Sam Raimi, 1987)
Frankenstein (James Whale, 1931)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)


Tony Grisoni

Tony Grisoni is the British born screenwriter of, among many others, ‘Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas’, ‘Tideland’, ‘Brothers of the Head’ and the ‘Red Riding’ trilogy.

Tony Grisoni's top ten
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)
The Strangers (Bryan Bertino, 2008)
Dawn of the Dead (George A Romero, 1978)
The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)
Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979)
[Rec] (Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza, 2007)
Audition (Takashi Miike, 1999)
Night of the Living Dead (George A Romero, 1968)
The Devils (Ken Russell, 1971)


Richard Haines

After editing Troma’s first schlock masterpiece ‘The Toxic Avenger’, Richard Haines became one of the Z-grade production house’s go-to directors, overseeing the likes of ‘Splatter University’, ‘Class of Nuke ’em High’ and ‘Space Avenger’.

Richard Haines' top ten (In alphabetical order)
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (Charles Barton, 1948)
Andy Warhol's Dracula (Paul Morrisey, 1974)
Andy Warhol's Flesh for Frankenstein (Paul Morrisey, Antonio Marghereti, 1973)
Carnival of Souls (Herk Harvey, 1962)
Carrie (Brian De Palma, 1976)
Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975)
Night of the Living Dead (George A Romero, 1968)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
Space Avenger (Richard W. Haines, 1989)
What Really Frightens You (Richard W. Haines 2009)


Robin Hardy

Robin Hardy is the director of beloved British classic ‘The Wicker Man’, though its financial failure meant that he struggled to find funding for other projects. In 1986 he directed ‘The Fantasist’, and has recently returned with a loose sequel to his masterpiece, entitled’ The Wicker Tree’.

Robin Hardy's top ten
Carrie (Brian De Palma, 1976)
Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979)
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)
The Birds (Alfred Hitchcock, 1963)
Rosemary's Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)
Jaws (Steven Spielberg, 1975)
Don’t Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)
Straw Dogs (Sam Peckinpah, 1971)
Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)
Hour of the Wolf (Ingmar Bergman, 1967)

‘I once liked Hammer horror films for their camp improbability, and also for making me want to cast Christopher Lee in a role worthy of his extraordinary screen presence. But sheer, unbridled horror I don’t enjoy. It’s like lingering at the sight of a sanguinary accident. I’ve listed the films that most impressed me, all because they had dimensions well beyond the horrific. Dimensions of pathos, beauty, humour, in short of “real life”, which made what was horrific in them palpably more real.’


Adele Hartley

Adele Hartley established the annual Dead By Dawn festival in Edinburgh, screening new and classic horror movies.

Adele Hartley's top ten
The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)
An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
The Haunting (Robert Wise, 1963)
Don’t Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)
Los Sin Nombre (Jaume Balaguero, 1999)
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Evil Dead II (Sam Raimi, 1987)
The Dark Hours (Paul Fox, 2005)
Cronos (Guillermo del Toro, 1993)
May (Lucky McKee, 2002)


Monte Hellman

Aproduct of the Roger Corman school, Monte Hellman is the cult director behind ‘The Shooting’ and ‘Two-Lane Blacktop’. In 1989 he directed slasher sequel ‘Silent Night, Deadly Night 3: Better Watch Out!’, which has been hailed as a lost classic of the genre.

Monte Hellman's top ten
Don't Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (Don Siegel , 1956)
Frankenstein (James Whale, 1931)
Dracula (Tod Browning, 1931)
Dead of Night (Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Deardon, Robert Hamer, 1945)
The Ghost Breakers (George Marshall, 1945)
The Mummy (Karl Freund, 1932)
The Picture of Dorian Grey (Albert Lewin, 1945)
The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
Rosemary’s Baby (Roman Polanski, 1968)

‘Honourable mentions: “The Omen”, “The Silence of the Lambs” and “A Nightmare on Elm Street”. And of course I'm fond of my own Better Watch Out!, but I recognize the possibility of bias.’


Sean Hogan

Writer/director Sean Hogan made his feature debut in 2005 with the haunted house horror ‘Lie Still’. His latest film ‘The Devil’s Business’ premiered at last year’s FrightFest.

Sean Hogan's top ten
The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (Tobe Hooper, 1974)
Don’t Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)
Suspiria (Dario Argento, 1976)
Let’s Scare Jessica to Death (John D Hancock, 1971)
The Innocents (Jack Clayton, 1961)
Day of the Dead (George A Romero, 1985)
Dead Ringers (David Cronenberg. 1988)
Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (David Lynch, 1992)
Pulse (Kairo) (Kiyoshi Kurosawa, 2001)


Tom Huddleston

Tom Huddleston is a film writer at Time Out London. He also runs the Exploding Head Film Club.

Tom Huddleston's top ten
Possession (Andrzej Zulawski , 1981)
The Fly (David Cronenberg , 1986)
Cat People (Jacques Tourneur, 1942)
God Told Me To (Larry Cohen, 1976)
The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)
Audition (Takashi Miike, 1999)
Evil Dead II (Sam Raimi, 1987)
Martin (George A Romero, 1976)
Society (Brian Yuzna, 1989)
Phantasm (Don Coscarelli, 1978)

‘I’ll admit, there was a certain amount of tactical voting going on here. I won’t hear a word against “Alien”, “The Exorcist”, “Texas Chainsaw” or “Dawn of the Dead”, but I wanted to throw my weight behind a few films which might have slipped off the bottom if not for an extra vote. A horror movies list without anything by Larry Cohen or Don Coscarelli – or indeed masterpieces like “Martin” and “Society” – was not about to happen on my watch. I also left off a couple of my all-time favourite films – “Night of the Hunter” and “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me” – because I simply don’t view them as horror movies.’


Contributors lists: A-Z

A-B

Including Clive Barker, Emily Booth, Jurgen Bruning and Anne Billson

C

Including Roger Corman, Alice Cooper, Billy Chainsaw and Coffin Joe

D-F

Including Joe Dante, Ruggero Deodato, Frank Darabont and Nigel Floyd

G-H

Including Monte Hellman, Drew Goddard, Tony Grisoni and Robin Hardy

I-L

Including Alan Jones, Robert Kirkman, Danny Leigh and Bruce LaBruce

M-N

Including Kim Newman, John McNaughton, Greg Nicotero and Neil Marshall

O-R

Including Simon Pegg, Debbie Rochon, John A Russo and Bernard Rose

S

Including David Slade, Tom Six, Eduardo Sánchez and Reece Shearsmith

T-Z

Including Guillermo del Toro, Ben Wheatley, Ti West and Rob Zombie


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