The 100 best romantic movies: 90-81

The 100 best films about love voted for by experts including Tom Hiddleston, Joan Collins and EL James

0

Comments

Add +

90

Some Like It Hot (1959)

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon

Best quote: 'Nobody’s perfect!'

Defining moment: Curtis, in disguise as a rich Brit, takes Monroe for a date on someone else’s yacht.

 

Love comes in spats
The romance in ‘Some Like It Hot’ is very much of the anything-goes, outsider sort. Wilder’s brilliant, high-energy transvestite comedy is a celebration of folk from the other side of the tracks dressed up as a madcap farce in which Curtis and Lemmon spend most of the film disguised as female musicians and on the run from the Chicago mob in 1929. It’s also, of course, a vehicle for Monroe’s beauty, charm and amply-platformed cleavage (seriously, check out her dresses in her two musical numbers).

Most of the fun lies in gender-bending games of mistaken identity that would make Shakespeare proud. But there’s also some real feeling here, both between Curtis and Monroe and, most bizarrely if fleetingly, between Lemmon and an ageing playboy. Delightful and giddy. DC

Read the Time Out review of 'Some Like It Hot'

89

Let the Right One In (2008)

Director: Tomas Alfredson

Cast: Kåre Hedebrant, Lina Leandersson

Best quote: 'If I wasn't a girl... would you like me anyway?'

Defining moment: Eli crosses the threshold to show Oskar why she needs an invite.

 

My bloody valentine
Just because a romance is between two twelve year olds, one of whom has been twelve for a really, really long time, doesn't mean it's not a romance. And so what if your new girlfriend a) isn't exactly a girl and b) feasts on the blood of innocents? At least you've got a girlfriend.

Oskar meets Eli at a difficult time in his young life, and quickly learns that the path of true love ne'er did run smooth, nor faint heart win fair maiden. This chilly Scandinavian take on vampire mythology is a pre-teen supernatural romance you can really get your teeth into – and there’s not a sparkly dreamboat in sight. CB

Read the Time Out review of 'Let the Right One In'

88

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)

Director: Mike Nichols

Cast: Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton

Best quote: 'You make me puke.'

Defining moment: George shoots his wife, kind of.


 

Love is a battlefield
Mike Nichols' acid-drenched adaptation of Edward Albee's stage play isn't everyone's idea of a great screen romance, but there's a reason we haven't called this list 100 Great Date Movies.

Yes, rarely has a Hollywood film depicted a marriage more bitter than that of George and Martha, an academic couple who wind up drunkenly airing their very dirty laundry in front of younger colleagues at a drinks party. But it's also an unusually truthful and compassionate study of the lies and defence mechanisms that keep even unhappy couples together. And casting Burton and Taylor as George and Martha – their own famously fraught marriage bleeding into the one they're acting out – was a masterstroke. GL

Read the Time Out review of 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?'

87

Tabu (2012)

Director: Miguel Gomes

Cast: Ana Moreira, Carloto Cotta

Best quote: 'It was from a dream...'

Defining moment: The heady strains of 'Be My Baby' filtered through colonial Africa.

 

Crocodile rock
Passionate exploration becomes possessive colonisation in both an African plantation and a series of romantic relationships in this playful two-act (plus prologue) tragicomedy from former film critic Gomes.

‘Tabu’ insures itself against the risk of coming across as insincere or twee via the cunning expedient of first showing us what will become of its gorgeous leads at the hands of that old inescapable: time. No amount of arch sound design, renegade crocodiles and fish-out-of-water doo-wop bands can offset the foreknowledge of the eventual destinies of steamy star-crossed couple Aurora and Ventura in contemporary Lisbon. CB

Read the Time Out review of 'Tabu'

86

Pierrot Le Fou (1965)

Director: Jean-Luc Godard

Cast: Jean-Paul Belmondo, Anna Karina

Best quote: 'I think your legs and breasts are very moving.'

Defining moment: When Belmondo and Karina flee from a burning car.

 

Bonnie et Clyde
This anarchic romance was made by French New Wave filmmaker Godard at the height of his powers and starred his then-girlfriend Karina and Belmondo, the thick-lipped, brooding star of his earlier ‘Breathless’. It foreshadows ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ in its story of a beautiful, lawless couple leaving polite society behind and going on the run, from Paris to the Med, pursued by gangsters.

It’s a cluttered burst of colours, ideas and emotions – a frantic essay on real life and movie life that overflows with energy and heady thoughts. It looks and feels like an outlaw romance, with Karina and Belmondo bringing style and attitude to the table, but it’s also a strongly experimental work made by someone determined to shake up cinema and the world. That itself is pretty romantic, no? DC

Read the Time Out review of 'Pierrot Le Fou'

85

Chungking Express (1994)

Director: Wong Kar-Wai

Cast: Tony Leung, Faye Wong, Takeshi Kaneshiro, Brigitte Lin

Best quote: 'People change. A person may like pineapple today and something else tomorrow.'

Defining moment: Faye Wong’s idea of affection involves rearranging cop Tony Leung’s apartment while he’s on the beat.

The Wong goodbye
Wong Kar-Wai’s third feature remains a perennially fresh declaration of his unique aesthetic, where the accretion of voiceover, music cues, faces and places creates an immersive mood more significant than whatever passes for a plot.

In this instance, that involves two sets of would-be lovers – policeman Kaneshiro falls for shady lady Brigitte Lin, while his colleague Leung circles around winsome kebab-stall girl Faye Wong. Still, the idea of actually getting it together is much less headily intoxicating than the sweet ache of a broken heart, or the woozy rush of unconsummated possibility. Meanwhile, Wong’s stop-go camera captures the restless bustle of pre-handover Hong Kong, and the melancholy sway of the original ‘California Dreaming’ sets the seal on an off-hand masterpiece. TJ

Read the Time Out review of 'Chungking Express'

84

Say Anything (1989)

Director: Cameron Crowe

Cast: John Cusack, Ione Skye

Best quote: 'I gave her my heart, she gave me a pen.'

Defining moment: Come on, like you don’t know. Window. Trenchcoat. Boombox. Peter Gabriel. Iconic.

 

Rich and strange
Cameron Crowe’s directorial debut may be remembered for That Scene With the Ghettoblaster, but there’s so much more to it than moody John Cusack and his synth-scored adolescent angst.

For one, there’s Ione Skye as his posh-kid paramour, who may suffer from occasional dream-girl tendencies but shows enough spark to justify John’s obsession. There’s also a terrific supporting cast including Frasier’s Dad John Mahoney, Joan Cusack, Jeremy Piven and a magnificently brash and spiky Lili Taylor.

But it’s the sweet, thoughtful, zinger-studded script which explains why, for one brief moment, we actually believed that Crowe could be the next Woody Allen, only with more New Wave hair and classic rock references. Oh, what might have been… TH

Read the Time Out review of 'Say Anything'

83

Juno (2007)

Director: Jason Reitman

Cast: Ellen Page, Michael Cera

Best quote: 'I still have your underwear.' 'I still have your virginity.'

Defining moment: Baby, schmaby: it’s all about Juno declaring her love for geeky Paulie Bleeker.
 

Que Cera, Cera
On release, first-time scriptwriter Diablo Cody’s Oscar-winning unplanned teen pregnancy comedy ‘Juno’ was all-but obscured by one debate: was it a pro-lifer tract deceptively gussied up in indie clothing?

The film’s abortion issues are still up for debate; leaving that aside for a moment, what’s left is a sweetly funny romantic comedy about relationships both teen- and middle-aged, and love of many kinds: parental, romantic and platonic. And sure, the teen-speak might bear about as much resemblance to real teenage slang as the actors in ‘Grease’ did to actual teenagers, but Ellen Page and Michael Cera’s performances remain pitch perfect. CB

Read the Time Out review of 'Juno'

82

Beauty and the Beast (1991)

Directors: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

Cast: Paige O’Hara, Robby Benson

Best quote: 'I love you.' With those three little words, Belle breaks the spell.

Defining moment: Belle teaches the beast to dance.

 

Monster love
No, not Cocteau’s 1946 masterpiece (you’ll find that at number 17). This is Disney’s magical cartoon, made in 1991 but harking back to the studio’s glory days. Unlike the golden oldies, however, this fairy tale features a plucky heroine, Belle, who braves slathering wolves to rescue her dad from the Beast’s terrifying gothic castle.

In fact, the Beast is a young prince turned into a monster for his cruelty by the curse of an enchantress. Only three little words can break the spell. It’s impossible not to be swept along by the gorgeous Broadway-style song and dance numbers and by what one philosopher called the fairy tale’s ‘great message’ – ‘that a thing must be loved before it is lovable’. CC

Read the Time Out review of 'Beauty and the Beast'

81

Waterloo Bridge (1940)

Director: Mervyn LeRoy

Cast: Vivien Leigh, Robert Taylor, Virginia Field

Best quote: 'Every parting from you is like a little eternity.'

Defining moment: Viv and Bob slow-dancing the ‘Auld Lang Syne Waltz’.

 

They are in paradise
The young Vivien Leigh will always be remembered for her indomitable Scarlett O’Hara in ‘Gone with the Wind’. But she also displayed heartbreaking fragility in this famous version of Robert E Sherwood’s play, an ill-starred romance ’twixt soldier and ballerina set against the chaos of war.

As WWII breaks out, colonel Taylor finds himself on Waterloo Bridge, assailed by memories of his whirlwind love affair in the same city during the Great War. Cue triple-strength schmaltz in the golden-age Hollywood manner as fate comes between the radiant couple, though not before they’ve shared an all-time classic clinch on New Year’s Eve, breathily smooching as lights are extinguished round a darkening dancefloor. Passion and foreboding in potent harmony. TJ

Read the Time Out review of 'Waterloo Bridge'

Continue to numbers 80-71 in our list of the 100 best romantic movies



Users say

2 comments
James McDonald
James McDonald

Just finished 90-81, and I had to comment on one thing so far. Why do you say "Oh, what might have been…" when describing Cameron Crowe?! I love his movies! Say Anything, Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous, Elizabethtown and We Bought A Zoo. I never saw Vanilla Sky, but I heard it wasn't so great. His movie just announced with Emma Stone, Bradley Cooper and Rachel McAdams also sounds like another winner to me! Different strokes for different folks I guess! Jerry Maguire better be on here though. :) Elizabethtown should be, but I doubt it is.

Cat
Cat

No Out of Africa?! Did I miss it? The Notebook - but no Out of Africa...okay...