The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Film

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Although Laughton doesn't attempt the acrobatics that Lon Chaney performed in the silent version, his hunchback comes across as one of the cinema's most impressive 'grotesque' characterisations. Dieterle directs in a way that reminds you of his background as actor/director in the German expressionist cinema: the visuals here impressively recall earlier movies from Metropolis (the crowds) to The Last Laugh (tracking shots through the shadows). Richly entertaining.
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Release details

UK release:

1939

Duration:

116 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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Paul Curran

A stand out cinematic master piece and Time Out defile it with the lamest, most trite review it has ever been my misfortune to read! Shame on you! The film is visually stunning and the already dark romantic tale of unrequited love/lust across the class divide is given a delicious sadistic twist by Cecil Hardwick . Charles Laughton gives a master class in scene stealing without saying a word! Break out the Gauloise and root for the bell ringer. You will never again pass a church without a wishful glance up to the bell tower.

Paul Curran

A stand out cinematic master piece and Time Out defile it with the lamest, most trite review it has ever been my misfortune to read! Shame on you! The film is visually stunning and the already dark romantic tale of unrequited love/lust across the class divide is given a delicious sadistic twist by Cecil Hardwick . Charles Laughton gives a master class in scene stealing without saying a word! Break out the Gauloise and root for the bell ringer. You will never again pass a church without a wishful glance up to the bell tower.