The Pride and the Passion

  • Film
  • Drama
0 Love It
Spectacularly solemn and silly epic based on CS Forester's novel about Napoleon's Iberian campaign (The Gun), full of sound and fury (and heaving bodies) signifying nothing. If you can believe in Sinatra as an 1810 vintage Spanish guerrilla, you can believe anything, but it's still a slog through a platitudinous script as (with Grant and Loren looking on while providing the love interest) he struggles to lug a vast cannon within range of the Napoleonic invaders.

Release details

Duration: 132 mins

Cast and crew

Director: Stanley Kramer
Screenwriter: Edna Anhalt, Edward Anhalt
Cast: Cary Grant
Frank Sinatra
Sophia Loren
Theodore Bikel
John Wengraf
Jay Novello

Average User Rating

5 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:1
  • 4 star:0
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|4
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cherpitel

Highly under-rated of great epic films. The story moves like Antheil's great music score. A story of courage & fortitude & determination.One of the best ever made in the spic genre.

cherpitel

Highly under-rated of great epic films. The story moves like Antheil's great music score. A story of courage & fortitude & determination.One of the best ever made in the spic genre.

Steve Paradis

The following is from the TCM notes: "The picture deviates sharply from the C. S. Forester novel on which it is based. There are no prominent female or British characters in the novel, and the character of "Miguel" in the film is a compilation of the several guerrilla leaders who take possession of the gun throughout the course of the book. In the novel, the gun, while it does eventually aid the downfall of the French through forcing the dispersal of their troops, is not used against a major city such as Avila and is destroyed in battle." In the book, the gun is an eighteen pounder, a normal artillery piece, and not the behemoth of the film. Forester's prescient 1933 novel about guerrilla war in Spain is a much darker and realistic story than the mess that was inflicted on the screen by Kramer. The star is for Anthiel's score, and the credit sequence by Saul Bass. If you're wise, you'll tune out when it ends.

Steve Paradis

The following is from the TCM notes: "The picture deviates sharply from the C. S. Forester novel on which it is based. There are no prominent female or British characters in the novel, and the character of "Miguel" in the film is a compilation of the several guerrilla leaders who take possession of the gun throughout the course of the book. In the novel, the gun, while it does eventually aid the downfall of the French through forcing the dispersal of their troops, is not used against a major city such as Avila and is destroyed in battle." In the book, the gun is an eighteen pounder, a normal artillery piece, and not the behemoth of the film. Forester's prescient 1933 novel about guerrilla war in Spain is a much darker and realistic story than the mess that was inflicted on the screen by Kramer. The star is for Anthiel's score, and the credit sequence by Saul Bass. If you're wise, you'll tune out when it ends.