The Ruins (18)

Film

Horror films

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Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>3</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>2</span>/5
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Time Out says

Posted: Tue Jun 17 2008

‘So, what do you guys think: ancient Mayan temple off the beaten path?’ Anyone who’s read ‘The Beach’ or seen ‘Turistas’, in which backpackers visit places that aren’t in the guide books, knows these are fateful words. Blissfully unaware of this, best friends Amy (Jena Malone) and Stacy (Laura Ramsey), and their respective boyfriends Jeff (Jonathan Tucker) and Eric (Shawn Ashmore), trek through the jungle to some remote ruins on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.

The foursome’s rough guides are German tourist Matias (Joe Anderson) and his Greek friend Dimitri, the former of whom has a copy of an old map – never a good sign – and is searching for his missing brother. As soon as they arrive at the ruins, which are wreathed in creeping vines, the temple is surrounded by hostile locals, who set up camp and won’t let them leave. What the kids don’t yet know is that the vines are the real threat; but pretty soon the plants’ invasive tendrils get under their skin.

While it’s hard to take entirely seriously a film in which the vibrating stamens of red vine flowers are able to mimic the sound of a mobile phone, it must be said scriptwriter Scott Smith’s adaptation of his own novel plays the ‘survival’ and ‘body’ horror absolutely straight. The crude amputations, bodily invasions and feverish flesh-slicing turn one’s stomach, but there’s a more insidious psychological horror that eats into one’s mind. Director Carter Smith, whose flesh-crawling short film ‘Bugcrush’ established his own ‘body horror’ credentials, also taps into the paranoia and disintegrating group dynamics found in Eli Roth’s flesh-eating virus movie, ‘Cabin Fever’.
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Release details

Rated:

18

UK release:

Fri Jun 20, 2008

Duration:

90 mins

Cast and crew

Cast:

Laura Ramsey, Shawn Ashmore, Jonathan Tucker, Joe Anderson, Jena Malone

Cinematography:

Darius Khondji

Music:

Graeme Revell

Director:

Carter Smith

Screenwriter:

Scott B Smith

Users say

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5
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Godfrey Hamilton

For some reason I find it remarkably depressing when a song over the closing credits rhymes 'phenomena' with 'astronomer', which normally would be OK except that the lyricist, who shall remain nameless, thinks that 'phenomena' is singular. That sort of inarticulacy sums up this dire film,which apart from a wince-making amputation sequence is very unengaging as horror/supense. Most annoying is the portrayal of the women/girls, alternately dithery and hysterical, emboldened and decisive then back to dithery little girlies again. In other words, the sexual politics of the film, usually a fascinating undercurrent in (intelligent) horror, are of the more adolescent hetero male variety; we get to ogle Ramsey in the altogether, but after a presumably passionate night together, why does she rise naked from their bed while hunky, cute boyfriend Shawn Ashmore remains chastely snug in boxer briefs, and fully dressed throughout the picture while Ramsey continues to totter and lurch around in her knickers? Odd, considering that director Smith made the eerie, grotesque and compelling gay allegory 'Bugcrush'.

Godfrey Hamilton

For some reason I find it remarkably depressing when a song over the closing credits rhymes 'phenomena' with 'astronomer', which normally would be OK except that the lyricist, who shall remain nameless, thinks that 'phenomena' is singular. That sort of inarticulacy sums up this dire film,which apart from a wince-making amputation sequence is very unengaging as horror/supense. Most annoying is the portrayal of the women/girls, alternately dithery and hysterical, emboldened and decisive then back to dithery little girlies again. In other words, the sexual politics of the film, usually a fascinating undercurrent in (intelligent) horror, are of the more adolescent hetero male variety; we get to ogle Ramsey in the altogether, but after a presumably passionate night together, why does she rise naked from their bed while hunky, cute boyfriend Shawn Ashmore remains chastely snug in boxer briefs, and fully dressed throughout the picture while Ramsey continues to totter and lurch around in her knickers? Odd, considering that director Smith made the eerie, grotesque and compelling gay allegory 'Bugcrush'.

Hector14

The movie is not that bad..if you are a gore hound,you will like the reakistic gory scences

Hector14

The movie is not that bad..if you are a gore hound,you will like the reakistic gory scences