The Tragedy Of Man (Az Ember Tragediaja)

Film

Drama

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160 mins

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Hungarian Cultural Centre London

Please see the full details below: Monday 25 March, 6pm Ciné Lumière, Institut français 17 Queensberry Place, London SW7 2DT MAGYAR MIND Open Lectures Series UK premiere screening The Tragedy of Man (Az ember tragédiája), 2011 Marcell Jankovics's animated feature film (159min) Introduction by Dr Gergely Bakos OSB, Sapientia College of Theology, Budapest Q&A after the screening with Marcell Jankovics The Hungarian Cultural Centre proudly presents the UK premiere of the feature animation The Tragedy of Man written and directed by Marcell Jankovics and an introduction by Dr Gergely Bakos OSB on the philosophical and theological aspects of the film and the drama it is based on: Imre Madách's outstanding work of the same title from 1862. Imre Madách's play has been translated into 90 languages and is one of the great works of Hungarian literature. The action takes place over the course of one very long dream, as Adam, Eve and Lucifer visit the world's great civilizations at the height of their power, only to watch as humanity's noblest hopes and dreams come to naught. If anyone could have any claims on adapting Hungary's best-known drama into a feature-length animated film, it is Marcell Jankovics, Hungary's best-known living animator. In 1976 his film "Sisyphus," a short-form masterpiece about the doomed, boulder-pushing king, was among the nominees for an Academy Award; the next year his "Küzdők" ("The Struggle") won the Palme d'Or for short film at Cannes. By the time Marcell Jankovics first started working on "Tragedy," in 1983, he had already directed two full-length films: "János Vitéz," Hungary's first animated feature, and "Fehérlófia," which stars a horse-suckled hero, his two brothers and a combative hobgoblin who loves to eat piping-hot porridge atop the bellies of his defeated enemies. Production began in 1988, at the tail end of what is now considered the golden age of Hungarian animation. Filmmaking in Hungary was a state-run affair, and the Pannonia Film Studio financed by the government, had become a mecca for many of the top animators, including Marcell Jankovics. A year later the government fell, forcing artists and directors to find other means of financing. Marcell Jankovics worked a section at a time, starting with the shortest scene, in which Adam transforms into a giant robotic spaceship as he and Lucifer hurtle through the cosmos. As soon as one section was finished, he'd go about raising money for the next, applying for small grants from organizations like the Hungarian Motion Picture Foundation. In the meantime he wrote several books on art and mythology, directed films and television series, and served as president of the Hungarian Cultural Society. The film crews he led as the "Tragedy of Man" director and writer changed substantially over the years, with animators retiring or dying. "The voice of God and Lucifer remained through the whole production," Marcell Jankovics said. "But Adam and Eve grew old, so younger actors were brought in." "Tragedy" has now played throughout Hungary, where it has been praised by critics, as well as at festivals in Russia, Serbia and the Czech Republic. The film has been screened at festivals in Poland, Portugal, Armenia and Canada, in addition to its American premiere. "It's a monumental, gigantic opus that Marcell Jankovics created, the film he was preparing for his entire life." (Robert Ito, The New York Times, 9 November 2012) Free but booking is required. Please call 020 7240 8448, email bookings@hungary.org.uk or visit www.hungary.org.uk.

Hungarian Cultural Centre London

Please see the full details below: Monday 25 March, 6pm Ciné Lumière, Institut français 17 Queensberry Place, London SW7 2DT MAGYAR MIND Open Lectures Series UK premiere screening The Tragedy of Man (Az ember tragédiája), 2011 Marcell Jankovics's animated feature film (159min) Introduction by Dr Gergely Bakos OSB, Sapientia College of Theology, Budapest Q&A after the screening with Marcell Jankovics The Hungarian Cultural Centre proudly presents the UK premiere of the feature animation The Tragedy of Man written and directed by Marcell Jankovics and an introduction by Dr Gergely Bakos OSB on the philosophical and theological aspects of the film and the drama it is based on: Imre Madách's outstanding work of the same title from 1862. Imre Madách's play has been translated into 90 languages and is one of the great works of Hungarian literature. The action takes place over the course of one very long dream, as Adam, Eve and Lucifer visit the world's great civilizations at the height of their power, only to watch as humanity's noblest hopes and dreams come to naught. If anyone could have any claims on adapting Hungary's best-known drama into a feature-length animated film, it is Marcell Jankovics, Hungary's best-known living animator. In 1976 his film "Sisyphus," a short-form masterpiece about the doomed, boulder-pushing king, was among the nominees for an Academy Award; the next year his "Küzdők" ("The Struggle") won the Palme d'Or for short film at Cannes. By the time Marcell Jankovics first started working on "Tragedy," in 1983, he had already directed two full-length films: "János Vitéz," Hungary's first animated feature, and "Fehérlófia," which stars a horse-suckled hero, his two brothers and a combative hobgoblin who loves to eat piping-hot porridge atop the bellies of his defeated enemies. Production began in 1988, at the tail end of what is now considered the golden age of Hungarian animation. Filmmaking in Hungary was a state-run affair, and the Pannonia Film Studio financed by the government, had become a mecca for many of the top animators, including Marcell Jankovics. A year later the government fell, forcing artists and directors to find other means of financing. Marcell Jankovics worked a section at a time, starting with the shortest scene, in which Adam transforms into a giant robotic spaceship as he and Lucifer hurtle through the cosmos. As soon as one section was finished, he'd go about raising money for the next, applying for small grants from organizations like the Hungarian Motion Picture Foundation. In the meantime he wrote several books on art and mythology, directed films and television series, and served as president of the Hungarian Cultural Society. The film crews he led as the "Tragedy of Man" director and writer changed substantially over the years, with animators retiring or dying. "The voice of God and Lucifer remained through the whole production," Marcell Jankovics said. "But Adam and Eve grew old, so younger actors were brought in." "Tragedy" has now played throughout Hungary, where it has been praised by critics, as well as at festivals in Russia, Serbia and the Czech Republic. The film has been screened at festivals in Poland, Portugal, Armenia and Canada, in addition to its American premiere. "It's a monumental, gigantic opus that Marcell Jankovics created, the film he was preparing for his entire life." (Robert Ito, The New York Times, 9 November 2012) Free but booking is required. Please call 020 7240 8448, email bookings@hungary.org.uk or visit www.hungary.org.uk.