The Unloved

Film

Drama

The unloved.jpg

Time Out rating:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>4</span>/5

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
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Time Out says

Tue Feb 16 2010

Although made for television and already transmitted on C4, actress Samantha Morton’s directorial debut definitely has a cinematic feel. Long unflinching takes, imposing frontal compositions and expressive use of colour and sound mark this portrait of the institutional care which fails 11-year-old Lucy (Molly Windsor, pictured) after she can no longer live with her estranged parents (Robert Carlyle, Susan Lynch). Given Morton’s own troubled personal history, there’s obviously an autobiographical element here, yet it’s remarkable how she sublimates any residual anger into the film’s sombre and sincere accumulation of detail, which illustrates camaraderie and rebellion, unwitting neglect and – sadly – manipulative abuse within the clinical environs of a Nottingham children’s home. Windsor’s taciturn and stoic central performance is both haunting and affecting, framed by Morton’s deliberate, even stately direction. Thankfully though, this isn’t a conventional film, but a campaigning document, an act of solidarity and a bold, emotionally piercing personal statement.
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Release details

UK release:

Fri Feb 19, 2010

Duration:

106 mins

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<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

5 / 5

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s ford

+1 to Morgan's statement. An incredible directoral debut. IMO a finer film than Arnold's Fish Tank.

s ford

+1 to Morgan's statement. An incredible directoral debut. IMO a finer film than Arnold's Fish Tank.

Morgan

Beautifully shot, beautifully told. It manages to avoid any of the preaching or easy stereo types so often poured into this type of film, most likely a result of the film representing something like Morton's own childhood. The two leads give performances a world apart in style, and united in their understated brilliance. Moving, powerful and beautiful - there are flaws of course, but it's a debut that demands Morton reconsiders her pledge not to direct again.

Morgan

Beautifully shot, beautifully told. It manages to avoid any of the preaching or easy stereo types so often poured into this type of film, most likely a result of the film representing something like Morton's own childhood. The two leads give performances a world apart in style, and united in their understated brilliance. Moving, powerful and beautiful - there are flaws of course, but it's a debut that demands Morton reconsiders her pledge not to direct again.