Wit

Film

User ratings:

<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>5</span>/5
Rate this
 

Time Out says

An HBO adaptation of Margaret Edson's Pulitzer-winning play in which a respected professor of 17th century poetry (Thompson) diagnosed with ovarian cancer. She decides to treat the disease as a new challenge. For once, this is a terminal illness drama which refuses to resort to mushy melodrama. The downside is that it's also unremittingly grim, full of windy sermonising about John Donne's poetry, and Thompson's asides to camera rapidly begin to grate.
0

Reviews

Add +

Release details

UK release:

2001

Duration:

99 mins

Users say

0
<strong>Rating: </strong><span class='lf-avgRating'>0</span>/5

Average User Rating

4.4 / 5

Rating Breakdown

  • 5 star:1
  • 4 star:1
  • 3 star:0
  • 2 star:0
  • 1 star:0
LiveReviews|3
1 person listening
KB

probably one of the most moving films I have ever seen, slightly slow moving to begin with, but stick with it...

J.G.

This movie is surely not one for a light-hearted laugh or two. It is unremittingly a hard look at one person's journey through the trials of chemotherapy for a cancer that has metastasized into other organs. Emma Thompson, perhaps better known lately for her lighter roles, does a simply masterful job playing Vivian Bearing, the English professor who finds ultimately that it is not knowledge, but love and kindness that matter most in the end. If the viewer of this movie has any sense of compassion at all, he or she would be wise to have a box of tissues at hand for this film. In my own opinion, though, it's a "must see" for anyone.

J.G.

This movie is surely not one for a light-hearted laugh or two. It is unremittingly a hard look at one person's journey through the trials of chemotherapy for a cancer that has metastasized into other organs. Emma Thompson, perhaps better known lately for her lighter roles, does a simply masterful job playing Vivian Bearing, the English professor who finds ultimately that it is not knowledge, but love and kindness that matter most in the end. If the viewer of this movie has any sense of compassion at all, he or she would be wise to have a box of tissues at hand for this film. In my own opinion, though, it's a "must see" for anyone.