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© Tyla, everyhundrethofasecond.wordpress.com

We're dedicated to finding London's greatest treasures, but we couldn't do it without the thousands of readers who share their recommendations with us. Read on to discover the places that Londoners really love... and love to hate.

Review of the week

David Glowacki on...'Her'

  • Rated as: 2/5

'The film starts quite well. It shows us how much technology impacts on our everyday modern lives. However the concept of falling in love with a cyberspace PC entity is just taken too far for anyone to be taken in. If it had more humour then the ridiculous could be taken at face value. The plot descends into such sloppy romantic slush that I found several scenes embarrassing. In fact, the long repetitive scenes of out right maudlin sentiments coupled with endless romantic piano music in the background were just so cringeworthy that it was extreme even for an American film.'

Share your review and win!

Every week, one lucky reader wins a bottle of Champagne Lanson for writing our review of the week. And each month, a top commenter on our website will receive a stay at a luxury hotel, courtesy of Small Luxury Hotels of the World. So don't forget to share your thoughts on the places you love - or loathe.


Exhibitions to visit

Richard Hamilton

'Great historic exhibition - a chance to see some iconic work first hand and a must see for all those interested in art and design and the the way we see the world today.' Ann Smith

  1. Tate Modern Bankside, SE1 9TG
  2. Thu Apr 24 - Mon May 26
More info

The Cheapside Hoard: London's Lost Jewels

'The wonder lies not in the size of these gems, but in their delicacy. This exhibition is made up of dozens of tiny, dazzling universes... it was impossible to choose a favourite.' Darren Ross

  1. Museum of London 150 London Wall, EC2Y 5HN
  2. Thu Apr 24 - Mon Apr 28
More info

Favourite places to eat

Aqua Shard

"London on a sunny summer's day from up high is just so magical, the crowds and traffic seemed far away, and after we felt as if we had been on a trip out of London for the day, not just a lunch." Lyn Cecil

  1. London Bridge
More info

Sager and Wilde

"Rare wines that are perfectly served, great staff and ambience - if you have an interest in wine or want to impress someone who does, this is the place." Pete Smith

  1. Haggerston
More info

Pitt Cue Co

  • Price band: 2/4

"If you have not been before, make sure you get the bone marrow mash, it is (according to my girlfriend) like eating a hug. So comforting." Rory McNully

  1. Soho
More info

Tapas Brindisa

  • Price band: 2/4

"Had gazpacho, lovely goats yoghurt, and yummy chorizo in a roll from their stall in Borough Market." Filiz Taylan Yüzak

  1. Borough Market
More info

We need your suggestions!

The best burgers in London

We've chosen our favourites - now suggest your burger joint of choice in the comments.

Best local parks

Nominate your local park in the comments, and we'll add it to our round-up of the city's loveliest green spaces.

London's best hairdressers

If your hairdresser's a hero, don't be shy - let London know here.

Secret London spots

Explore our map of London's lesser-known places, and suggest your own.


London through your lens

Calling all photographers! Share your shots of London life in our Flickr group, and we might just blog it as our Photo of the Day. (If you're an Instagram fan, you can just tag your photos #timeoutlondon.)

  • Camden Lock

    (Photo: Lee Nichols)

    Camden Lock
  • Lovebox festivalgoers

    (Photo: Lisa, <a href="indigoburns.com">indigoburns.com</a>)

    Lovebox festivalgoers
  • A sunny lunch break, St Paul's

    (Photo: Quoc Nguyen)

    A sunny lunch break, St Paul's
  • Watching tango, Spitalfields

    (Photo: Julian Chan)

    Watching tango, Spitalfields
  • Invisible street performer

    (Photo: Sean Batten)

    Invisible street performer
  • Yoga in Covent Garden

    (Photo: John Barber)

    Yoga in Covent Garden
  • Red Bull Soapbox Derby

    (Photo: Tyla, everyhundredthofasecond.wordpress.com)

    Red Bull Soapbox Derby

Camden Lock

(Photo: Lee Nichols)

Users say

104 comments
Andrea D
Andrea D

Choccywoccydoodah, 30-32 Fouberts Place, W1F 7PS


This is a perfect place to treat friends or family while in London. The Bar du Chocolat is upstairs above the store and is delightfully quirky. They serve a delicious range of their cakes and chocolate at a reasonable price. 


My 8 year old loves it here as much as my teenagers, and of course myself! The picture is of her with one of their amazing dipping pots. 


So when you are next in Oxford Street and wondering where to rest your weary feet after all that shopping or sightseeing, look no further than here. 


http://www.choccywoccydoodah.com/locations/bar-du-chocolat.html


Kat H
Kat H

Sizwe Banzi is Dead  (The Young Vic) - Review

Underneath the heat of stage lights in The Maria theatre space, you could almost forget that you’re in a breeze-block box in Lambeth. This, in addition to two powerful performances from Sibusiso Mamba and Tonderai Munyevu, creates an unforgettable theatre experience, in which escapism is key.

Matthew Xia’s masterful direction of Sizwe Banzi is Dead encourages the audience to feel included, and to laugh along to Styles’ anecdotes as he hands out props to audience members. However, the hard-hitting subject matter of racial segregation is never far from the viewer’s minds, especially as black and white audience members are separated in the seating area.

As the play traverses deep into discussions of identity, Munyevu’s effervescent Styles gives way to practical, shrewd Buntu; the man who steers bumbling Robert in his journey of self-preservation. The characters intertwine, and together with a cyclical plot, create a performance which feels inescapable. Angela Gasparetto – Movement Director – deserves special mention for her inimitable skills. She has imbued the characters with perceptible history and life, through Styles’ manner of storytelling and the physical manifestation of Robert’s fear.

Athol Fugard’s play, which was first performed in 1972, can offer much as an educational tool. The power of the subject of apartheid cannot be denied, when such a small cast and sparse set are employed. Audiences are forced to consider their own feelings about identity, in a play which resonates more than 20 years after segregation ended.

Jordan Mant
Jordan Mant

This week's TimeOut Magazine advertised free pancakes at John Lewis in Oxford Street. As students, who always love free food, we headed over to Oxford Street this lunchtime and it turned out that we were in for a very good surprise! We were expecting a pop-up window handing out free pancakes but instead we were greeted by a mini-restaurant in the window of the John Lewis store. The restaurant only had two tables and therefore only eight people were allowed in at a time. This expected free pancake stall turned into a session with cook Sophie Grey where she taught us how to cook the perfect savory pancakes, with caramelised onions, thyme and goats cheese. It became quickly apparent that this free session was to promote Tefal's new range of frying pans. At first, I was a tad cautious that it was going to become a sales pitch but instead we were informed that goody bags were waiting outside for us with pans worth £60! That's right, professionally made pancakes, a cooking session and £60 worth of produce for FREE! I was expecting a catch at some point, but there wasn't one! The whole event was just for marketing purposes as we were eating our pancakes in a restaurant as part of a window display so there was a slight feeling of being a goldfish as people walked past the shop on Oxford Street, so if you don't like being watched whilst eating then this may not be for you. However great free food is worth it, trust me! Sadly, the pancake pop-up shop was only open on the 3rd & 4th March but there is one great moral to this story: If TimeOut tells you to go to a free pancake event, GO! You may even get an extra goody bag too!

NICOLA MORGAN
NICOLA MORGAN

KETTNER'S RESTAURANT, SOHO I visited this restaurant with my husband and two daughters for a birthday celebration / pre-theatre dinner. My husband is a wheelchair user. We did struggle to enter the restaurant using the main entrance but there is a ramp available at the side entrance that has to be unlocked by a member of staff. All staff were friendly and helpful but the building is not ideal for a wheelchair user despite having a wheelchair accessible toilet (steps have to be negotiated). The meal and service were excellent, good value pre-theatre dinner menu (£25-£30), within walking distance (5 minutes) of west-end theatres. Beautiful decor, live pianist at certain times. Would visit again. Very interesting history of the building. Staff have an information sheet. It is reported that Oscar Wilde and Agatha Christie have dined at Kettner's, along with Edward VII.

Lluis Casanova
Lluis Casanova

Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch 1980 tested the limits of my artistic sensibilities. Only after 1 hour and 40 minutes (of a total of 3 hours 40) of theatrical nonsense, one of the actresses / dancers / performers touched my soul when, strangling a stretched red pillow, softly muttered: "I want to go home". Sista, believe me: you weren't alone in that sentiment. The ultimate highlight, however, oddly came when I pointed this fact to my significant other, who was sitting by me almost as puzzled as I was shocked, and we both had to muzzle ourselves using our coats as roaring laughter bursted out in an un-political correctness, which was at the same time impolite and liberating. Took us both quite a few minutes to calm down... under the scrutiny of many obviously much more sensible towards dance-theatre without much dance in it. In my opinion? Not worth it.

Simon Westley
Simon Westley

East India Youth, The Lexington, 6th February 2014 In the 1970s Leo Sayer sung about a One-Man Band, conjuring up images of a ramshackle performer simultaneously playing multiple instruments. Will Doyle, aka East India Youth, is the one-man band of the current age, but gone is the adjective ramshackle, replaced with sublime. Will's performance creates an unsurpasable soundscape through his mastery of keyboard, computer, guitar and endless looping, all complemented with his striking vocal. But the electronic wizadry is not a substitute for lazy application; on the contrary Will Doyle actively produces a high-energy show tonight, showcasing all that is good on his recently released Total Strife Forever album. The set nicely dovetails the tunes from the album with poignant lyrics like Dripping Down, Looking For Someone and Heaven How Long with mind-boggling near-orchestral extensions. The more i listen to the album it is these very instrumental tracks that reveal greater depths and show why this album has received such high acclaim. As a one-man performer Will Doyle carries the show superbly. The fact is he does not need to pile all this pressure on himself. He could take the easier route by delivering these songs through fronting a band (he has a track record of this in his previous Doyle & The Fourfathers persona). Instead East India Youth creates a focal point for these brilliantly crafted tunes, delivered with tempo and energy of the highest grade.

Simon Westley
Simon Westley

East India Youth, The Lexington, 6th February 2014 In the 1970s Leo Sayer sung about a One-Man Band, conjuring up images of a ramshackle performer simultaneously playing multiple instruments. Will Doyle, aka East India Youth, is the one-man band of the current age, but gone is the adjective ramshackle, replaced with sublime. Will's performance creates an unsurpasable soundscape through his mastery of keyboard, computer, guitar and endless looping, all complemented with his striking vocal. But the electronic wizadry is not a substitute for lazy application; on the contrary Will Doyle actively produces a high-energy show tonight, showcasing all that is good on his recently released Total Strife Forever album. The set nicely dovetails the tunes from the album with poignant lyrics like Dripping Down, Looking For Someone and Heaven How Long with mind-boggling near-orchestral extensions. The more i listen to the album it is these very instrumental tracks that reveal greater depths and show why this album has received such high acclaim. As a one-man performer Will Doyle carries the show superbly. The fact is he does not need to pile all this pressure on himself. He could take the easier route by delivering these songs through fronting a band (he has a track record of this in his previous Doyle & The Fourfathers persona). Instead East India Youth creates a focal point for these brilliantly crafted tunes, delivered with tempo and energy of the highest grade.

Rebecca Latham
Rebecca Latham

The Coen Brothers add another story to their patchwork quilt of America with their latest film; Inside Llewyn Davis. Set on the cusp of the Dylan-led folk music explosion in sixties America is the quiet story of a fictionalised folk singer from Greenwich Village: Llewyn Davis. A seemingly permanent nomad, he drifts from couch to couch leaving a lasting impact everywhere other than where he most desires: the music industry. He has the substance and talent to be a music legend yet is a chronic victim of his inability to display any social grace. The enigmatic Oscar Isaac plays the lead with a familiar disgruntled energy that has become befitting of many male characters of late: he is an utterly frustrating yet endearing character. Despite the destruction he leaves behind and the carelessness in which he goes about his life, he is a truly arresting spirit that is a testament to the persistent interest in sixties New York. Isaac is joined by a band of worthy players including the Coen Brothers staple John Goodman as a deranged and volatile heroin addict with a gold cane. Also present are sixties’ fan boy Garrett Hedlund, HBO giant Adam Driver, plucky Justin Timberlake and, moving away from her agave-sweet girl-of-interest roles, an ever so angry Carey Mulligan. All signposts and narrative cliches are avoided in a typical Coen Brothers move, meaning that a patient viewer will be rewarded. Other audience members may ultimately find the work a tad lack-lusture. Certainly, the film has a leisurely pace and concludes in a rather undramatic fashion yet it is a precise and involving picture that lures you in with Isaac’s folk version of a siren song. Absent from the nominations for an Academy Award this year relieves some of the pressure off the critics-favourite creative duo, allowing the film to breathe and be appreciated away from award season hype. Ultimately, it is another vivid insight into an aspect of the American narrative that renders the Coen Brothers as one of the more interesting social commentators currently working in film.

Becky Morrison
Becky Morrison

You could be forgiven for coming over all Downton Abbey as you stepped through the doors of the very grand Gilbert Scott tearoom. Located inside the elaborate St Pancras Renaissance Hotel, I had to resist the urge to scream things like 'Tally Ho, Old Chap' at passing wait staff, decked out in traditional garb complete with fancy gold bands holding up their shirt sleeves. Inspired by the Bronte sisters' love of afternoon tea between bouts of their proto-feminist scribbling, there were cakes, crust-less sandwiches, and yes, there was tea. So far, so traditional. But bite into the caramel coloured cupcake and you taste the unexpected twist of bitter aniseed, scones are replaced with a fluffy blob of glistening pistachio mousse, and if you're looking for neat crustless cucumber in your sarnies, look elsewhere. The website offers a rather misleadingly named 'exhibition' which actually turned out to be a few fancily framed Victorian-style oil paintings modified for the Instagram generation. Propped up by the bar (where the best views are), an excitable bunny rabbit in hoop skirt and kid gloves emerges from the station, whilst a very stern gopher in a military uniform looks on. I was glad to hear that tea and sandwiches were refillable at no extra charge, I don't think you'd have found Emily or Charlotte paying through the nose for an extra pot of Yorkshire's finest after all. At an eye-watering £25 per person, a taste of the Bronte lifestyle doesn't come cheap. But for an experience that takes you back in time, and as much Earl Grey as you can drink, it's definitely worth it.

Carol  jones
Carol jones

I just can't resist a whole lobster all to myself so The Burger and Lobster sounded just my kind of place. I was not disappointed. There's no menu - it does what it says on the tin- you get either a burger or a lobster, with delicious salad and chips for £20 . There is one Burger and Lobster in Mayfair and one now in the City but we went to the one in Dean Street, Soho. Judging by the queues in the evenings we made the right choice by going at lunch time. The non alcoholic drinks are very good too.

christine westlake
christine westlake

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY - - An excellent show, true to the book- although some are disappointed that Willy Wonka does not make an appearance earlier, if you read the book you would not expect him to appear sooner. The cast portray their characters with real depth and superb timing.The children are brilliant with acting skills far beyond their years. the show brings out the child in everyone.

Lesley
Lesley

Through a combination of cajolery, bribery and plain old fashioned blackmail, I managed to get hold of what must surely be the hardest seat to come by since Noah announced unavailability for mammals of the two legged variety on his cruise around the world: a ticket to watch Donmar Warehouse's production of Coriolanus. The play features actor du jour Tom Hiddleston as the titular Roman general Coriolanus battling against a familiar sounding populace fed up with the economic struggles and drudgery of life. When Coriolanus runs for the position of consul this sets him up against public opinion which demands that he panders to the electorate, but alas with tragic consequences. This may be one of Shakespeare's lesser known tragedies but the play has a relevance and topicality that Hamlet or A Midsummer Night's Dream lack. Hiddleston has returned to his roots as a theatre actor and with his Hollywood blockbuster credentials (he plays Loki the Norse god of mischief in the Thor series of films) under his belt, this shows to staggering effect. The role of Coriolanus is an intensely physical one with sword fighting and battle scenes between Hiddleston and Hadley Fraser as his arch nemesis Aufidius but the amazing choreography alone is well worth the price of admission. Hiddleston snarls his way across the stage with savage fury at what he perceives to be the ingratitude of the population. The tiny Donmar is one of the smallest theatres in the West End without any of the extravagant settings that other plays may boast. But the minimalism of the Donmar's stage and setting lends itself to an intimacy which brings one up close and personal with the action. This production of Coriolanus is a master class in how to update Shakespeare to a raw, edgy and contemporary standard.

Zenlo
Zenlo

I'll be concise and Eminently lucky! "Thou shall not have no other Tracy before Art"

Jeremy Reynolds
Jeremy Reynolds

Frozen Cinemas around London Disney’s “Frozen” is an exciting and funny film, which keeps up good pace throughout. There is a great script and some farce for the younger children – a comic snowman is a big hit. The are some good songs (Let It Go is a stand-out) and the story of Elsa journey to understand the importance of goodwill to her sister and being a good queen to her people is strong enough to hold the film. SPOILERS BELOW However I did think that “Frozen” raises fairly serious issues, picks away at them for a while, and then resolves the storyline without really resolving the issues. Frozen deals with being different, not in the sense of being an outsider, but just being different to others around. I this case Princess Elsa’s difficult to deal with and misunderstood ability to create snow and ice, a metaphor for any kind of difference (ranging from mental or physical disability to merely not conforming) one cares to choose. Told by her parents to keep her “difference” – or “talent” – hidden, and made to be scared of playing with her sister Anna because of the danger she could cause, the princess becomes scared of herself, and eventually a sociopath. Events trigger the unleashing of her powers, and she attempts to prevent repetition by physically isolating herself in an ice palace high on a mountain. In the liberating “Let It Go”, she explains her relief at finally being able to be herself, and to really explore and use her abilities. We all want that, of course. From here the film heads downhill (literally to some extent) towards the resolution of the story. Elsa accidentally harms her sister again, and is portrayed as a monster who must be destroyed (it helps the propaganda that she is aided by a real monster). She allows herself to be captured out of remorse, but escapes on learning of villainous plots. Love (sisterly love in this case) saves Anna, and love of humanity allows Elsa (now Queen Elsa) to use her abilities for good – or at least fun. The story is resolved, the assimilation of her difference is contrived. Still a good film.

Jeremy Reynolds
Jeremy Reynolds

Emil and the Detectives National Theatre, Boxing Day The National Theatre’s production of Eric Kastner’s “Emil and the Detectives” is a lively show for the family. The story has 2classic” status, of course, and this version does not take too many liberties (though some may quibble about the chase sequence through the sewers, a nod to “The Third Man”). The first half shows Emil’s small town life and his trip to Berlin, and we meet Mr Snow, given additional edge by Stuart McQuarrie wielding a flickknife. The second half belongs to the ensemble of “detectives”, with some excellent performances among the crowds and some lovely touches - “Shhh....it’s Silent Irene”. The large Olivier Theatre is filled out as the increasing numbers of children track down and corner the thief, and a jaunt into the audience brings the house down. Director Bijan Sheibani’s success is in reproducing the atmosphere of the original story, and emphasising the book’s camaraderie and collaboration among the children which the adults portrayed have lost.

Lisa Pollitt
Lisa Pollitt

London's Leicester Square - alive, vibrant, and buzzing. If you want to dine, have wine or simply dress up and shine you have it all at your feet in London's Leicester Square. Those wanting to eat will find themselves in for a treat with a selection of places to dine including TGI's, Chiquito's, Angus Steakhouse and Mcdonalds. Relax and unwind and enjoy the buzz of the bars. A fantastic day, night or a cinema trip where you will maybe see some stars. A drink and a natter or for the game lovers join the Monopoly tour and round London you will scatter. Leicester Square more than makes London live up to the city that never sleeps however if you do feel the need the hotels and boutiques are warm, welcoming, plush and chic.

nicola ware
nicola ware

London Eye I took my Daughter for her 6th birthday just before Christmas and both she and my son loved the whole experience. Barely any queuing time and the booking process couldn't have been more simple. Shame about the rain but you can't predict the British weather and it kind of added to the atmosphere!

Martin Dove
Martin Dove

Imperial Hotel We stayed on the eighth floor which had fabulous views over Russell Square. The hotel was better than expected, and at £99 for two, including a cooked breakfast, was excellent value. It is within walking distance of Kings Cross, St Pancras and Euston, and also close to the British Museum. We saw War Horse at night, and this was also near enough to walk back to the hotel. I would stay here again. Room Tip: Ask for a room on the eighth floor, overlooking Russell Square.

Eric Han
Eric Han

English National Ballet: 'Nutcracker' I was told that nothing lasts forever. Maybe it's right. But if there's any exception, it is going to be art. Sometimes words can't express my whole feeling, even in my own language. From the very first beginning, when overture started to play I was feeling like electricity running through my body. Never before have I seen such a loving movement from human body to a extraordinarily beautiful music. Every step the dancers took, every sound the music made, I was fascinated and overwhelmed. Once Carlos Santana mentioned, I was experiencing 'soulful ecstasy' during the show. My heart was filled with extreme joy and happiness and I returned to my childhood when I was innocent. I've always dreamed of watching 'Nutcracker' when the Christmas season came so finally it became realised tonight. I'll never forget this precious and priceless moments for the rest of my life.

Eric Han
Eric Han

English National Ballet: 'Nutcracker' I was told that nothing lasts forever. Maybe it's right. But if there's any exception, it is going to be art. Sometimes words can't express my whole feeling, even in my own language. From the very first beginning, when overture started to play I was feeling like electricity running through my body. Never before have I seen such a loving movement from human body to a extraordinarily beautiful music. Every step the dancers took, every sound the music made, I was fascinated and overwhelmed. Once Carlos Santana mentioned, I was experiencing 'soulful ecstasy' during the show. My heart was filled with extreme joy and happiness and I returned to my childhood when I was innocent. I've always dreamed of watching 'Nutcracker' when the Christmas season came so finally it became realised tonight. I'll never forget this precious and priceless moments for the rest of my life.

Rose Pickles
Rose Pickles

American Psycho The Musical at the Almeida Theatre A Hit that Feels Like a Kiss There is no moment of hushed voices and dimmed lights; you are punched straight into the action by a flash of white noise. It feels as though you have been woken by an electric shock. You are in Patrick Bateman's apartment, sterile and cinematic, with his figure slowly rising through the floor, silhouetted by the ultra violet light of his home tanning bed. The integration of action, set and music is flawless, impossible sequences are created effortlessly. It manages to incorporate detail on a filmic scale with a vitality that enhances the clinical style and black humour. From Batemans crisply pressed socks to the mental unravelling played out on the revolving set, alive with projections, you are caught up in the pulse of 1980's New York. Murder scenes seem incredibly violent and visceral for such a stylized production. Their effect is a heightened sense of reality, made pleasurable by the subversion of expectations. There is a nightmarish quality to it that is strengthened by the attention to detail giving it a depth that makes it seem inescapable. You are sucked in, thrown about and spat out by it but it’s addictive and you want more.

Kay Davies
Kay Davies

Clink 78 Hostel on Kings Cross Road is a unique fun place to stay if you are on a budget or just wanting something different. We opted to stay in one of the original police cells, there are 6 of these each with a bunk bed in. Alternatively you can stay in a private room, a single sex dorm or a mixed dorm. Prices obviously vary, our 2 man cell was just £74 for the Saturday night. This included breakfast. Not a full English admittedly, but it was still a breakfast. The whole building, which is a 200 year old court room mixes the original beautiful Victorian architecture with trendy modern artwork. One court room is a TV room, the other a WIFI and computer room. You can sit in the docks whilst you check your emails. All the staff are very cheerful and helpful and make you very welcome. Finally, don't be put off by thinking it is a 'youth' hostel. I am in my mid forties and saw other who were even more mature in their age. Yes it is good for the young because of the price and many are clearly backpacking, but we are all on a budget and when there are fab places like this to stay - why wouldn't you,

Eon Irving
Eon Irving

Film: 'Nebraska' After his Oscar winning triumph of ‘Sideways’, film director Alexander Payne returns to the ‘road movie’ genre with this exceptionally moving tale of Woody Grant (Bruce Dern in a career best performance), an old man believing he has won a million dollars sweepstake decides to walk the 850 miles to Lincoln, Nebraska to collect his money. Although his family know this is not the case, his son David (Will Forte) drives him there instead. Their journey through America’s heartland ( beautifully shot in widescreen black & white) puts a human face on old age, regret and family as Woody’s determined effort to collect represents a victory in an otherwise wasted life. The sharp script switches from drama to comedy with a light touch. The excellence of the cast shines brightly, but without doubt this is Bruce Dern’s show and he holds you to the very last frame.

robert stacey
robert stacey

I,ve just had a brilliant day in London with my wife.Flew over from Guernsey,started at Borough Market then walked along and went up the Shard.Caught the Underground to Oxford Circus,walked along to the new hotel in Berners Street which has just reopened.We used to stop there when it was Berners Hotel.Had a cocktail then walked around the corner to the Langham Hotel for another cocktail.Caught the Underground to Harrods,then back to the Wolseley for something to eat (a brilliant place) Then off to see the Magic Flute at the Colisseum.Regent Street,Carnaby Street and Oxford Street lights on the way back to our hotel in Russell Square.

helen
helen

Start: Weave east to the corner of a street of worm larvae, to reach a stewing lagomorph. This is just an example of the type of cryptic conundrum my we were faced with on the trail. After paying the £16 fee to participate, we were thankfully told the starting point and the clues commenced from there. Fifteen of them, 2.3 miles and no set time limit- though if you want a chance on the leader board, you have to get moving! In reality though, getting lost must result in many teams doing more than the stated distance. We navigated dark, crooked alleyways, found ourselves in secret gardens and took in the twinkling lights of the city skyline as we climbed to a mystery viewpoint. It felt like we were the only ones creeping around the city as we deciphered the clues, taking in the old, crumbling city walls with the gleaming, modern offices. In contrast to the bustling city of the day, by night it was eerily quiet. Although it can be slightly advantageous at times to have some geographical and historical knowledge, it is not essential as most of the clues depend purely on using your eyes to find hidden things and being able to solve the puzzling clues. I now know how much I would be fined for taking my goat across the bridge... As lovely as going for a meal and a few drinks with my boyfriend is on a Saturday evening, I wanted to rediscover my adventurous self and at the same time, see a London I knew existed, but never got around to visiting. And so the treasure hunt was a perfect reason to get out and about, use our ( limited) navigational skills and test our ( again, limited) history of London. If you managed to solve the clue above, you will have found silk street and made your way down it, to reach the Jugged Hare and the beginning of the trail. Take your time, I’d like to stay top of the leader board.

Harriet Johnstone
Harriet Johnstone

As I stand shivering in the cold, communal changing room I make a mental note: Never wear a G-string to a sale again. Bare bottomed and beet red, the only thing keeping me from tears is the green writing scrawled all over the price tag of the Maison Martin Margiela dress I clutch in my shaking hands - ‘75% off’. There is a god. The Designer Warehouse Sale is full of gems like this. With big labels including: Gucci, Prada, Vivienne Westwood, Dolce & Gabbana, Celine and Roberto Cavalli all packed into the Islington warehouse, it’s the frugal fashionista’s dream. Set over two floors with the lesser known labels on the lower level and big brands up top, there’s a decent selection of formal wear, accessories, casual clothes and shoes to tempt anyone. Running from Friday to Sunday with new stock added each day and just £2 entry, the sale is well worth the trip. So long as you’re wearing full, proper, Bridget Jones worthy, all ass encompassing underwear that is.

Terry Egan
Terry Egan

A new, cutting-edge drama, by Georg Kaiser! Deluded by the apparent decadence of a surprise customer, a bank clerk absconds with 60,000. But his romantic nature deceives him, the beautiful customer doesn't want him and he goes, instead, on an episodic and fantastical journey in pursuit of meaning. Stunning. Only trouble is: it isn't new - 'From Morning to Midnight' was written in 1912; it isn't cutting-edge - it's expressionist; it isn't drama - it's an 'Everyman'-like series of encounters; and Georg Kaiser has been dead nearly seventy years. The National Theatre's latest re-version, by Dennis Kelly, is symptomatic of an on-going retro-cum-nostalgia trip for the-future-that-never-happened. We haven't forgotten modernism and yet we're doomed to re-live it forever. The only catch is, post the-end-of-history, the future-that-never-was comes across as rather clunky. The opening scene, setting up the bank house, has an 'Are You Being Served' feel to it - all broad caricature and sound fx. Our hero (played the night I saw it by Jack Tarlton) - finding himself in a snowy wilderness represented by a gi-normous white groundsheet - evokes Gene Kelly in 'An American in Paris'. None of the jokes will be unfamiliar, and you're left with the feeling it would work far better as a cartoon, an episode, even, of 'Duckman'. But what the play is, at heart - what it should be - is ineradicable, the conclusion still brutally effective. Too, the cast, crew and set are all up to the National's scratch; it needs, perhaps, just to better mix the parts of its sum. And if you go to bed thinking it's rubbish, you'll wake up thinking it's brilliant.

Maureen Feldman
Maureen Feldman

Visit the Geffrye Museum, Shoreditch, wonderful events for children, room settings of bygone days, cafe and gardens. FANTASTIC introduction to children of all ages as how our home were furnished in the past.

Christine Wilkinson
Christine Wilkinson

The best review I could every give is to go and see Phantom of the Opera, one of the must see musicals ever, I have seen it three times so far and hope to see it many more, I never tire of it, the music and staging is so special and so unforgettable!!!

Zena Nattriss
Zena Nattriss

If you are a fan of Shakespeare, or even if not Visit The Globe Theatre - it's really hot Step back in time and see how entertainment used to be When you went out to a play, rather than watching TV With its open thatched roof and great atmosphere You could almost hear the audience shout & jeer The trapdoor in the roof over the stage 500 years ago must have been all the rage Men played all the womens roles Dressed top to toe like Barbie dolls In those days there were no bathrooms or WCs The audience just went when & where they pleased The straw on the ground must have smelled of poo But at least there wasn't a queue for the loo...... Do take the 30 minute tour, it was a delight Well worth seeing - an absolute delight!

kim tyler
kim tyler

We were lucky enough to get tickets to see Robbie Williams live at The London Palladium on friday , and WOW what a treat we normally visit our local theatre or large stadiums for concerts . I have always wanted to go to one of Londons old theatres . The hospitality was great , the entertainment was fantastic. We paid £55 each which was great we had one the best nights out ever , highly recommend to all :-)

kim tyler
kim tyler

I would like to say we had an amazing evening this week when we watched the christmas light switch on in Oxford Street , the atmoshere was lovely young and old very fetive . This years acts were entertaining , Jessi J interacted withthe crowd and talked about how sha watched the lights as a child . The lights were very modern and would recomend this free event to all :-) .

Holly Powell
Holly Powell

It had been a long time since I last went to a zoo but the sun was out and I found an offer with national rail for London Zoo. If you travel by train, so long as you show your tickets there and have printed off the necessary voucher, you can get in two for one, an absolute bargain. From the station it was a beautiful walk through Regent's Park, taking roughly ten minutes with stunning fountains and lots of space to have a sit down, kick around or romantic walk. London Zoo has a vast range of animals and lots to keep the kids entertained, as well as the adults. Factual and fun shows, butterfly tents, monkey walks, aquariums and big cats on tiger trail means that there is something for everybody. The only thing I would recommend if you go here for a magical day out is to take a packed lunch. We ended up queuing for almost half an hour to get food, to pay extortionate prices for average food and then have nowhere to sit. There are plenty of snack bars, however, so if you can hold on there are plenty of restaurants near enough to visit. A fun filled day out at a good price. A must do in London.

John Cutland
John Cutland

When I was seven years old - a long time ago - I stood outside The Tower of London one night and heard the sound of the soldiers "locking up" The Tower - "The Ceremony of The Keys". Not long ago my daughter arranged for me to be inside The Tower to actually see it happen. Being a witness to this 700 year old ceremony is one of the secret highlights of London. It's free, you need to plan two months ahead but it's an absolute must.

Karen Lakeman
Karen Lakeman

This was my fourth visit to Saf so the food cant be all that bad. On this, perhaps my final visit to the open plan corner of upstairs at the Wholefoods Market in Kensington high street I dined alone after an afternoon’s shopping, having run out of carnivorous friends who were willing to try pretty hardcore vegan delights. I’ve had soggy (wheat free) pasta at this yummy mummy canteen before but on the whole the dishes I’ve tried have been innovative, healthy and delicious and being vegetarian it’s wonderful to be able to choose from a whole menu (rather than ‘veggie options’). The restaurant area, and it can hardly be called a dining room being separated by a low partition wall from the seating for all the food stands is noisy if there are children screaming and draughty by the windows. However it’s the service that has and always let this place down. After being shown to my table I waited for ten minutes without being offered the menu or a drink and walked up to the service station to request both. After this my server changed and there was some improvement. The disinterested first waiter was more at home discussing chicken with some reluctant for-one-night only-vegans at a neighbouring table, obviously having not himself bought into the place’s ethos. I had snapped up a Groupon offer for four courses with a glass of champagne for £25. To start from the set menu of signature ‘cheese’ board or mezze platter I chose the latter (not being a fan of chalky vegan cheese). The platter was large for the first of four courses but was deceptively light. Delicious dolmades and hummus and avocado dips accompanied by interesting crisp wheat-free bread and very fresh salad leaves zinging with a raw garlic dressing. The next course took thirty minutes to arrive during which time the new waiter wandered over to ask if I had already had it. The much anticipated Sichuan dumplings finally arrived. They were delicate and delicious pot stickers in a dark rich soy based sauce. There are a lot of raw options available and a friend on a previous visit had bemoaned that her Pad Thai was ‘like eating salad’. But I ordered the Tom Yam Phak, a tasty hot and spicy bowl of (cooked) noodles with tofu, this being the freezing start to December. For the final course I eschewed the virtuous and bland sounding poached pear and went for the raw carrot cake which was delicious (and virtuous to boot). Saf at the Wholefoods Market, Kensington W8 With two glasses of very drinkable house red (at £7.50 a pop) to follow the champagne, my bill including the special Groupon price and not including (very sketchy) service was £40; so you get the picture that this open plan bare tabled area of a food hall is quite pricy without an offer involved. This is the second Groupon deal they’ve run (a sure sign of insufficient footfall ) and their sister restaurant in East London has closed. It would be a shame to see one of London’s very few vegan restaurants close but they need top notch service to match their top notch prices

Pam Ridgway
Pam Ridgway

What a find! We chose the Brasserie Zedel for our sons 30th birthday lunch following a review in The Metro. We were not disappointed. From the outside this restaurant looks small and cafe like but once inside you are transported back in time to a world of elegance and sophistication. To access the restaurant you go through to the rear of the cafe area and down a sweeping staircase decorated in the most amazing 1920's style. It really took our breath away. When we entered the restaurant the staff were attentive immediately and we really felt as though we could be on the set of a Poirot programme. The restaurant was huge and completly full with the amazing 1920's theme carried through. We were given time to meet and greet our party of 11 before the menus were brought and drinks order taken. The menu was extensive and something to suit every pallette from the obvoius french cusine of frogs legs and snails to rabbit, lamb and fish, even a 7 year old boy who claimed that it was the best burger he had ever had! It was served french style and we were concerned that he would enjoy it but we needn't have worried. To a person the food was considered amazing. the staff were almost invisible and yet constantly aware of our needs. We wanted for nothing. The most remarkable thing was when the bill came. £325 for eleven of us for a 3 course meal including tips and drinks. We are now looking for another excuse to go to London so that we can visit Brasserie Zedel once more.

Saskia
Saskia

One of my favourite places is the ENO. The collisseum is just such a wonderful venue. I recently went to see Madame Butterfly, the famous opera from Puccini. The staging was just amazing, absolutely beautifully executed. In one scene, a very romantic setting came to life with large lanterns, in another act origami style birds were carried over the stage by dancing people dressed in black and there was even puppeteering. Combined with the wonderful music, this made for a splendid evening out and had me spell bound from the very first moment till the last.

Jen Catlow
Jen Catlow

2.8 Hours later by Slingshot - http://8hourslater.com/ When I sent out the speculative text asking my friends if they wanted to pay good money to be chased around a secret location in London by volunteers dressed as zombies, I wasn't expecting much of a response. Yet somehow a few months later on a chilly October evening, myself and 12 other suckers found ourselves on the start-line of the city’s premier interactive apocalypse experience. In 2.8 hours later, groups of survivors have to navigate their way to a series of fenced off locations, where at any point actors dressed as zombies can (and will) begin to chase you in what is essentially a high stakes game of tag. The entire event’s production was truly first class, if a little on the pricey side. The actors were more than credible, and kept up boundless enthusiasm despite the hordes of participants. The commitment to the game’s storyline was exhaustive, even if it occasionally resulted in mid-game queuing. However it was more than worth it for the adrenaline rush which ensued after every precisely timed zombie ambush. The event ended at a ‘Zombie Disco’ where the ‘infected’ were transformed into the undead, and true survivors swapped stories of narrow escapes. In short, this was street gaming at its absolute best.

Ann Rowe
Ann Rowe

When my sister and I went to see From Here To Eternity we left feeling that we should try and watch the original film (which both of us only remembered vaguely). Surely the film that had one of the sexiest scenes in cinema history (Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr making love on the sand as the waves washed over them) could not have been the same story that is now playing on the London stage? The story is set in Hawaii and we were expecting beautiful backdrops showing sparkling blue seas and white sands but from the dull props the setting could easily have been Southend. Darius Campbell certainly looked the part, tall, handsome and with a very deep resounding speaking voice which certainly was reminisce of Burt Lancaster but there seemed to be no magic between him and his love interest. Their romantic trysts seemed mechanical and passion was lacking. I am sure that in the 1951 film there was a lot less swearing but there would have been a lot more emotion. It wasn't the worst play I have seen but it wasn't in the top 10 either. It was an entertaining evening but also slightly disappointing.

Alex Gibson
Alex Gibson

I had the pleasure of attending one of your recommended ‘cheap thrills’ this week when I went to see the incredible Josh Record at Electrowerkz. I wasn't sure what to expect as a venue as have only been to Islington Metal Works once before for a completely different event. Turns out, it is an awesome quirky place to have such an intimate gig. Separate bar in a campervan check! Huge shoe shaped chairs in the ladies check! Well loved main stage room with excellent lighting check,check! I could have stayed there for the rest of my life listening to the dulcet tones of Josh Record and not forgetting his bassist and keyboardist who add that little something extra that you just can't help but want to go and see them again and again. I would recommend snapping up ticket before he hits the big time and it won't be so intimate anymore.

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Martyn Hughes
Martyn Hughes

Don't get me wrong - I like TimeOut magazine, it's just that it used to be a fantastic source of useful info for anything and everything which was happening in London..... This skinny dumbed-down new format is just no use for people like me who need to check out the huge variety of stuff which the old TimeOut used to contain and set the standard right at the top of the 'Most Interesting & Essential Guides to London-Life'. Please, Please, Please, When can we expect the old mag to be brought back and normal service resumed ? It doesn't matter if you have to put the price up again, it's just that we're lost without it !

Hayley
Hayley

Cosy, laid back and oozing authenticity...who’d have thought you’d just stepped off Homerton High Street. This recently opened little Spanish tapas restaurant was already full of diners at 9pm on a Friday night but the friendly staff invited us in for a vino at the bar before promising us the next available table. Stepping off the high street into this cosy bar makes you feel a world away from the drunks and rough nuts of Hackney (although you’ll still catch a few stumbling past the window and leering through the glass at you). With a guitar player strumming some Spanish tunes in the corner, beautiful wine and not to mention the fresh, flavoursome food, this place has such a great ambience you could pretty much be in Spain. Reasonably priced with staff happy to recommend fave dishes, throw in a bit of your best Spanish lingo and you may get yourself a free apperativo shot and complimentary olives! Fantastic vibes and great food, plus only a stone’s throw away form cool new pub ‘The Plough’ across the road to continue your night. £41.00 bill for five amazing dishes and a bottle of Rioja between three of us, will definitely be back.

Pip Last
Pip Last

Cirque Eloize - iD Fifteen artistes and a fast paced two hours of gripping displays of strength, circus feats and streetdance. If you think Cirque du Soleil had the whole circus thing wrapped up then this may change your mind. Visually stunning, with the clever use of projected graphics to create an array of gritty urban backdrops and all set to thumping electropop, cut with piano solos. Some of the most striking pieces from this talented collective were the two handers - from the opening strongman and his featherlight partner to the comic contortionist and her beau. The antics had the whole audience rapt and seat squirming at the same time. The larger set pieces included trick cyclists, daredevil chair tower balancing and Double Dutch jump roping.......the energy and pace astounded. And the finale........ well that would be telling. It is simple, just go.

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