Holborn restaurants

Check out one of Holborn's great restaurants

Alys Tomlinson / Time Out

The restaurants in Holborn offer outstanding food with a side of adventure. Take in some burgers, milkshakes and bowling at All Star Lanes, or enjoy afternoon tea at Bea's of Bloomsbury. Read the Time Out guide to Holborn restaurants and cafés to find the right one for you.

Asadal

Critics' choice

With a discreet entrance just by Holborn station, Asadal has been the go-to venue for Korean food fans in central London for many years.

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Midtown

Great Queen Street

Critics' choice

A product of the noughties gastropub boom, Great Queen Street still turns out dishes in the tradition of its antecedents, and of the year it was founded (2007).

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Covent Garden

Holborn Dining Room

If there is a formula for the perfect British brasserie, it would undoubtedly involve plush leather upholstery, polished marble floors, a sprinkling of copper and more than a hint of oak. Akin to a stately gentlemen’s club, the service would be impeccable, while the cooking wouldn’t offend diners’ palates or risk displacing older patrons’ teeth. If anyone should know how to set up such a restaurant it’s Des McDonald, who after 20 years running Caprice Holdings is behind this new hotel dining room.  From the comfort of the red leather and tartan-trimmed banquettes in the sweeping expanse of his retro dining room, you can tuck into a range of classic British cooking, diner-style dishes and homely desserts, while a host of smart waiters attend to your every need. True to form, the food is mostly subtly flavoured and soft-textured.A starter of roasted langoustine saw the sweet shellfish enveloped in a pleasing garlic and butter sauce simply presented in a cast-iron pan. A main of ‘hock and coq pudding’ turned out to be more racy in name than flavour, with tender strips of chicken and ham encased in a pastry shell, framed by a bright green parsley sauce. The Holborn Dining Room may not serve the most exciting food in the capital, but it’s comforting, won’t scare the maiden aunts or the in-laws, and is an appealing place to get away from the chaos of modern London.

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Midtown

All Star Lanes

Styling itself on stateside ‘boutique’ bowling alleys, this retro-themed venue is the more upmarket of Bloomsbury’s two bowling dens (see also Bloomsbury Bowling Lanes).

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Bloomsbury

The Terrace Bar and Food

Set on the Lyttleton side of the famous National Theatre, Terrace Bar and Food is a popular addition to the South Bank icon.

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Southbank

Bea's of Bloomsbury

Bea’s of Bloomsbury is a fast-expanding café, with new branches on the King’s Road in Chelsea and at One New Change in the City. But it’s this original in Bloomsbury which is the best, not least because it’s the source of all those spectacular gateaux and special occasion cakes – the busy, and sometimes noisy, kitchen and bakery occupies the rear half of the long and narrow space. Choose your seat in the long corridor facing the counter carefully, as the tables nearest the front bear the brunt of the constant bustle of takeaway customers; further back the room’s only slightly cosier. But people don’t come to Bea’s for the ambience (the tables are wipe-clean bare, though not always spotless) or for the service (frosty on our most recent visit) – they come here for the cakes. The ‘sweet tea’ at £12 comprised a double-decker of plates; the lower deck a too-crumbly scone with clotted cream and strawberry jam, the upper deck a more impressive display of confections. Among them were a moist cupcake the colour of dried blood; a tiny square of peanut and jam brittle; tiny, jewel-bright meringues; a dice-sized brownie, and some wobbly, caramel-coloured marshmallow. All of these were impeccably made with top- quality ingredients. The Jing tea selection also does the trick. The full afternoon tea, with savoury eats, is only served at weekends at the St Paul's branch.

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Holborn

Fleet River Bakery

This café-bakery’s focal point is its heavily laden counter of baked delights. Alongside old favourites (moist carrot or chocolate cake), there are more unusual offerings, such as the ‘Fleet Jaffa Slice’ and caramel and peanut butter shortbread – all perfect with a cup of quality Monmouth coffee. The cafe’s tucked-away location has done nothing to inhibit its success, and lunch hour draws a crowd, much of which is from local offices. Sandwiches, quiches and frittatas are also available, and a daily special is offered from midday, when the scene is reminiscent of a school canteen, with customers queueing for staff to spoon a robust portion of steaming stew, bake or pie on to their plates. Such popularity is not without reason: chicken, mushroom and tarragon lasagne (£7) was an unfussy, filling and tasty affair. They have recently added mezze and cheese plates to the offering on Thursday and Friday nights. Decor has a modern-rustic vibe, with reclaimed-door tabletops adding interest to otherwise unremarkable surroundings. If you don’t mind the lack of elbow room, this is a great place to grab a decent lunch for under a tenner.

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Midtown

Fryer's Delight

Although this looks like a London cabby’s chip shop, its adherents are far more widespread. Every lunchtime, businessmen, hungry locals and passing trade wander into this blast from the city’s culinary past. Furnishings don’t seem to have changed much in the 50-plus years since fish were first fried here. It’s a cosy little spot, with Formica-topped tables, long benches and an old-school menu up on the wall. New restaurants may try to recreate this ‘retro’ look, but Fryer’s is effortlessly genuine. Even Giuseppe, the Italian boss who’s been frying in London for the past 45 years, is a no-frills man; he claims not even to like fish, but he certainly knows how to fry it. Cod flakes were moist, against dark, dry and crisp batter, fried the old-fashioned way in beef dripping (or vegetable oil for veggies). Try rockfish as a stronger-flavoured alternative to cod, and make your own butty with a doorstop of bread that comes slathered in butter.

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Midtown

Adobo Mexican

'Healthy. Fresh. Mexican.' This is the tagline for Adobo Mexican, but they're not fooling us – it's another burrito bar. Portions are huge, the permutations of fillings are endless, and the staff we spoke to didn't speak Spanish. Not that you have to, of course.

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Midtown

Hummus Bros

Holborn branch of the Soho original, serving bowls of hummus topped with all kinds of kinds of toppings.

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Bloomsbury

Comments

1 comments
Kim
Kim

Recently went to ALPS, a fantastic Ethiopian restaurant in Holborn (42 Theobald Road WC1X 8NW). For an adventurous culinary experience full of varied tastes and textures. Being a Londoner there are few flavours and cuisines I have not experienced, but the dishes served by this kitchen were really impressive. Often served by the gently spoken chef who takes time to explain to the uninitiated, the traditions behind each dish and also the traditional way to eat them. This was a really engaging way to have dinner, everyone loved the food and was thrilled by the level of service and attention to detail of the dishes. Also great vegetarian option. If you are not familiar with Ethiopian food let the staff guide you, the £10 a head option to be served a variety of many dishes left everyone very satisfied! Very reasonably priced.