Mayfair restaurants

Treat yourself to an amazing meal at one of Mayfair's best restaurants

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As a playground of the wealthy, Mayfair has more than its fair share of amazing restaurants. Cuisines range from Asian (Princess Garden) to British (Corrigan's Mayfair) and everything in between. But the French restaurants, like Le Gavroche or Hélène Darroze at the Connaught, really stand out here. Though, really, it's hard to go wrong when eating out in Mayfair.

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  • Rated as: 4/5

As I crossed Grosvenor Square on the way to this new restaurant, a large group of flag-waving, chanting protestors were being kettled away from the entrance of the US Embassy. This is one aspect of the current Marble Arch location the Embassy’s staff won’t miss after they move to their new fortress in Nine Elms, Vauxhall. But they will find little else to take solace in, once they’re relocated from Mayfair, because in comparison, Vauxhall’s a Guantanamo Bay for

  1. 34 Grosvenor Square, ((entrance is on South Audley Street)), W1K 2HD
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Brasserie Chavot

  • Rated as: 4/5

By Guy Dimond After too long an absence, smart French food is back en vogue. Balthazar in Covent Garden kicked off this season’s revival with a Yankee high-five to the brasserie – but Chavot ups the ante. ‘Larousse Gastronomique’ – the standard reference book for classic French cooking – states that ‘the distinction of all brasseries is that they serve a limited menu at any time of the day’. Which Brasserie Chavot doesn’t. But we’ll forgive chef Eric Chavot

  1. 41 Conduit Street, W1S 2YF
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Burger & Lobster

  • Rated as: 3/5

Don’t be put off by the gimmicky concept or swanky addresses of the four branches of this Russian-owned chain; this sleek eatery represents remarkably good value for money… if you order the lobster. As you walk through the door in the Mayfair branch (an attractively converted pub), a blackboard tells you all you need to know about the menu: you may order a lobster (boiled, grilled or in a brioche roll with mayonnaise), or you may have a burger, all served with a substantial

  1. 29 Clarges Street, W1J 7EF
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Cecconi's

  • Rated as: 4/5

Cecconi’s, located just behind the Royal Academy, shows London at its most cosmopolitan. A chic restaurant and bar with wraparound windows and striped marble floors, it’s part of the cool Soho House group. Service comes from classy white-jacketed staff and food is served all day – everything from egg white omelette to lobster spaghetti. The fare is pleasingly simple rather than imaginative. We sat at the marble-topped bar next to a blonde bombshell sipping pink champagne

  1. 5A Burlington Gardens, W1S 3EP
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China Tang

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Critics choice

Sir David Tang’s slinky dining room in the Dorchester’s basement successfully manages to banish all thoughts of hotel restaurants from diners’ minds. The separate Park Lane entrance helps, as do art deco furnishings evoking 1930s Shanghai. Only the moneyed, multinational clientele remind you of the locality. China Tang has formidable kitchen resources, so it would be a shame to stick to the western-oriented set meals (where cheung fun is renamed cannelloni) – though à la

  1. The Dorchester, 53 Park Lane, W1K 1QA
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Corrigan's Mayfair

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Critics choice

As your coats are taken and reservations checked, a pianist tinkles away on a baby grand by the entrance of Richard Corrigan’s Mayfair restaurant. If stopping for a drink, you’re led to a long marble bar topped with individual railway-style lamps; those eating continue to the dusky, romantically lit dining room, which has any solemnity removed by humorous feathered lampshades and metal bird sculptures. Pure luxury seeps from the copper-panelled walls in Corrigan’s where,

  1. 28 Upper Grosvenor Street, W1K 7EH
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Le Gavroche

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Critics choice

This restaurant colossus offers unapologetically old-school fine dining. First opened in Chelsea in 1967 by the Roux brothers, Albert and Michel, it’s now run by Michel Roux Jr who took the reins in 1991. Le Gavroche continues to be the go-to haute cuisine establishment for a dignified, extremely wealthy crowd (our reservation took three months to secure). While it may bear the name of the street urchin from Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables, there’s nothing scruffy about the

  1. 43 Upper Brook Street, W1K 7QR
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Goodman Mayfair

  • Rated as: 4/5

‘Bringing the New York steakhouse to London.’ Not the most original brief, but this (Russian-owned) newcomer has a decent stab at bringing Manhattan to Mayfair: dark-wood panelling, inviting leather booths, a bar counter running the length of the restaurant, and staff so chatty and involved in your order they practically sit down to eat with you. (Our waiter gave us a five-minute wine discourse, talking through the choice of 20-odd on the red-heavy list.) If the server did

  1. 26 Maddox Street, W1S 1QH
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Gymkhana

  • Rated as: 4/5

Patron-chef Karam Sethi has added a new venture to his line-up of Trishna (a suavely modern Indian restaurant in Marylebone) and Bubbledogs (Charlotte Street’s hot-dogs and fizz trendster). Gymkhana has the look and feel of an Indian colonial club with its retro ceiling fans, marble table-tops, and yesteryear photos of polo and cricket team triumphs. Bar staff theatrically deliver Indian punches in sealed medicine bottles, accompanied by ice-filled silvery goblets. Bombay

  1. 42 Albemarle Street, W1S 4JH
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Greenhouse

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Offer

It takes just a couple of steps along the decked, tree-lined entrance of this Mayfair mews restaurant for a sense of oasis and calm to descend – an atmosphere that is deliberately cultivated and carried through to the cool, well-spaced dining room. Solicitous greetings abound the moment you cross the threshold; the Greenhouse is a place where chairs are tweaked, tables brushed and every detail seen to by a considerate team. The place was buzzing on a weekday lunch with a

  1. 27A Hay's Mews, W1J 5NY
  2. 3 course set menu for £30
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Hakkasan Mayfair

  • Rated as: 3/5

The original Hakkasan opened nearly a decade ago, in 2001 – the same year Beijing won the bid to host the 2008 Summer Olympics. Since then, the popular image of Chinese culture, cuisine and competence have changed greatly. Alan Yau was the original mastermind behind the groundbreaking restaurant, ambiguously located underground in an alley near Tottenham Court Road tube. His interpretation of Chinese cuisine was refreshing, bringing Cantonese cooking and fine dining together

  1. 17 Bruton Street, W1J 6QB
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Hélène Darroze at the Connaught

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Critics choice

Genial staff take obvious pleasure in working this historic dining room, with its beautiful wood panelling and floral plasterwork ceiling. India Mahdavi’s feminine interior of velvety golds complements the original features, while Damien Hirst’s artwork keeps it grounded in the present. Waistcoats, silver jugs and Baccarat crystal denote formality, so first-timers may be surprised by the rusticity of the food on display: a leg of ham for carving, butter pats as big as cheese

  1. The Connaught, (Carlos Place), W1K 2AL
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Hibiscus

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Critics choice

Chef Claude Bosi opened a gastropub in Fulham in 2012 to go with his other one in Wimbledon, but he clearly hasn’t taken his eye off this flagship restaurant. There’s no à la carte (unless you really want it), so choose three, six or eight courses – and marvel, as the extraordinarily composed dishes arrive on your table with military timing. On a ‘Taste of Spring’ menu, almost everything included a potentially unusual combination of fruit/savoury flavours – a single

  1. 29 Maddox Street, W1S 2PA
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Hix Mayfair

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice
  • Offer

Mark Hix is director of food at this stylish hotel dining room (Marcus Verberne is executive chef), and his influence can be seen in the modern British menu and also in the modern British art. The wood-panelled room is a relaxing and attractive place in which to eat, and staff are attentive (quick to proffer spare reading glasses, for example) without being obsequious. Compared to previous meals here, a midweek dinner lacked a certain something: deep-fried Cornish lamb’s

  1. Brown's Hotel, (33-34 Albemarle Street), W1S 4BP
  2. 2 courses & a choice of cocktail £30 3 courses £35
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Maze Grill

  • Rated as: 3/5

This steak-centred outlet of the Gordon Ramsay empire sells some fine food. A starter of tender salt and sichuan-pepper squid: very good. Aberdeen Angus ribeye steak: excellent. Slow-cooked pork belly with roast sweet potatoes and chilli-blazing pickled cabbage: outstanding. Great ingredients beautifully cooked. But there were numerous negatives too on our recent visit. One is the expense if you eat steak. A 10oz ribeye costs £32 and comes with not a single extra; it sat in

  1. 10-13 Grosvenor Square, W1K 6JP
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Momo

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

Still London’s most glamorous Moroccan restaurant, Momo attracts a fair smattering of beautiful people alongside couples on special dates, hen parties and business types. The soundtrack of classic Maghrebi beats and attractive young francophone waiting staff create a seductive buzz. Sexy Marrakech-style interiors, sparkling with light from intricately latticed mashrabiya-style windows and ornate metalwork lanterns, add to the allure. Tables are small and tightly packed, but

  1. 25 Heddon Street, W1B 4BH
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Murano

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice

If you’re accustomed to the clash and clatter of hard surfaces in modern restaurants Murano may come as a shock. Plump upholstery, crisp linens and warm leather ensure a sumptuous, serene setting for a meal that draws as much on French fine dining as Italian staples. Chef-proprietor Angela Hartnett pops out regularly to chat with obvious regulars, diners linger long over numerous courses and pricey wines, and waiters glide silently between tables ensuring that service is

  1. 20 Queen Street, W1J 5PP
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La Petite Maison

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Critics choice

On a sunny day, La Petite Maison gives a decent impression of somewhere on the Côte d’Azur, with its cream pillars, spacious dining room and light flooding in through big windows. It’s a franchise of a renowned establishment in Nice, but unlike nearly all restaurants in France it doesn’t offer set menus to soften its prices (not shown on the otherwise-jaunty website, so they can come as a shock). If you’re bothered about cost, however, it’s fair to say you’re not at

  1. 54 Brooks Mews, W1K 4EG
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Pollen Street Social

  • Rated as: 3/5
  • Critics choice

Pollen Street Social’s philosophy is ‘deformalised fine dining’, and to this end the decor is smart but approachable – white-walled, linen draped and wood-panelled. Dishes are grounded in French and English tradition and embellished with occasionally esoteric side notes of texture and taste, sometimes garnered from chef Jason Atherton’s travels. They’re seasonal too, in terms of ingredients, but not necessarily in mood. On the hot June day of our visit, we craved

  1. 8-10 Pollen Street, W1S 1NQ
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Rextail

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Offer

‘Who are all these people?’ it’s tempting to ask as you look around this room full of the international super-rich. For them, dining in a fabulous Mayfair restaurant such as Rextail is an commonplace occurrence. But for the rest of us, this is for special occasions; a well-tuned dining destination that disguises its professionalism behind quirky good looks and bouncy Baltic beats. Rextail is the latest London restaurant from Russian restaurateur Arkady Novikov (of Novikov

  1. 13 Albemarle St, W1S 4HJ
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Scott's

  • Rated as: 4/5

Now inevitably linked with Charles Saatchi and Nigella Lawson, Scott’s had for the previous 162 years been best known for its fish. And with good reason: the seafood here is first class. The centrepiece of the restaurant is a grand oyster bar where Mayfair types sip flutes of Gaston Chiquet and feast on fines de claires by the dozen. In the club-like seating area, diners get stuck in to Cornish sardines laced with parsley, sautéed monkfish cheeks with bordelaise sauce, and

  1. 20 Mount Street, W1K 2HE
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Sketch: Lecture Room & Library

  • Rated as: 4/5

The arresting entrance hall, with its high-impact artworks and greeters who are part-cast and part-personal assistant, are cues that you are entering not just a building of dizzying grandeur, but a designed world with a playful, theatrical bent. Sketch’s Lecture Room & Library is up a very fine staircase. Flooded with light from a glass ceiling dome, and governed by immaculately tailored staff, it’s the most classical space in the complex, with the food providing the

  1. 9 Conduit Street, W1S 2XJ
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Theo Randall at the InterContinental

  • Rated as: 5/5
  • Critics choice
  • Offer

Since 2006, when Theo Randall, long-time head chef at the River Café, opened this eponymous restaurant its reputation (and Randall’s media profile) has gone from strength to strength. The colourful, spacious dining room is high on comfort, if a little corporate, with cream leather, walnut wood and olive green shades. Service is caring and warm-hearted and the cooking, in our experience, is joyous. The carte is not cheap, featuring luxury produce such as Limousin veal and wild

  1. 1 Hamilton Place, Park Lane, W1J 7QY
  2. 2 courses with a glass of prosecco £27
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Via Condotti

  • Rated as: 4/5
  • Critics choice

Named after the swish Roman thoroughfare, Via Condotti provides understated elegance and pared down Italian restaurant food on one of Mayfair’s swankiest shopping streets. Prices aren’t extortionate for the location and for the quality of classic combinations distinctively presented (buffalo mozzarella with a skinned plum tomato quartered into fleshy ‘petals’, for example). This metropolitan, rather than rustic, style of Italian cooking depends on the quality of

  1. 23 Conduit Street, W1S 2XS
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Wild Honey

  • Rated as: 4/5

Wild Honey underwent a revamp in autumn 2012 – the dining room still has the same wood panelling meets modern art vibe as before, but it’s now possible to look from one end of the vibrantly accessorised (the soft furnishings, in particular) restaurant to the other. The quirky nooks and crannies have been lost, but it no doubt makes things easier for the staff. A meal from the spring menu promised much, but didn’t always deliver: organic salmon, with piquillo peppers, butter

  1. 12 St George Street, W1S 2FB
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