Fashion insiders' favourite London shops

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Gareth Pugh asked some of London's fashion aristocracy for their favourite London shops for fashion and more

  • Fashion insiders' favourite London shops

    Stephen Jones at Tom Baker © Rob Greig

  • Find more secret East End shops | Find more secret west London shops

    Stephen Jones loves...
    Tom Baker, Soho
    It was while studying at Central Saint Martins School of Art & Design and frequenting the Blitz club in the early ’80s that Stephen Jones, now 52, carved a niche for himself making exquisite hats for customers as diverse as Princess Diana and Grace Jones. Almost 30 years on, he still makes the most elegant headgear in London with a new clientele including Beyoncé and Alison Goldfrapp. From February 24, the V&A launches Hats: An Anthology by Stephen Jones which runs until May 31. Jones has also recently designed lacquered feather hats for Gareth Pugh’s debut menswear collection.

    ‘I love coming here because, number one, it’s yellow, probably my favourite colour. It’s like the sister to my shop in Covent Garden, very similar in mood. I initially found out about Tom through [clubbing legend] Phil Dirtbox. I was attending the “Anglomania” show at the Met in New York in 2006 and decided I needed an outfit, so Tom and I started to work together on a suit. I work with a lot of designers and the process you go through with Tom is very different; I always say, “Well, I’ll go with it.” I trust his opinion. It’s based in traditional tailoring but it’s got lots of character about it. ‘I look terrible in designed clothes – I like to wear a top-to-toe look. Even during punk times, I was the one who wore a suit. Tom can fit perfectly and he knows exactly what works and what looks flattering. I’m 5'9", I know that Tom will make a suit that fits on the knee and make my legs look longer. Tom doesn’t take himself too seriously. So much of menswear is about perfection and the cut of a millimetre. I like the fact that he doesn’t get hung-up on perfection which is quite like me in a way. I like spontaneity. ‘I probably own about ten Tom Baker suits, which I wear all the time. But I don’t wear them every day; Tom’s clothes are really my dressing-up clothes. I keep them for special occasions. The process takes four to six weeks, sometimes eight. I do occasionally phone up the week before a major shoot or event and say: “I really need a great new suit.” ‘The thing about Tom’s clothes is that they are an expression of the way he is. Sometimes we do make quite classic clothes like a tuxedo but we’ll always do it in a grosgrain fabric. Tom has all my measurements but we still do fittings as things often change.’
    Tom Baker, 4 D’Arblay St, W1F 8DJ (7437 3366/www.tombakerlondon.com). Oxford Circus tube. 11am-7pm Mon-Fri, 10am-6pm Sat.

    Maggie Davis loves…
    Linda Bee
    ‘This eye-grabbing Grays Antiques shop sells exquisite twentieth-century costume jewellery including the dazzling 1930s necklace I wore on my wedding day.’
    Grays, 58 Davies St, W1K 5AB (7629 7034).

    Lulu Kennedy loves...
    Lina Stores, Soho
    Lulu Kennedy, 39, is the founder of Fashion East, which has been supporting new designers for eight years. Kennedy helped Gareth Pugh put on his first fashion show, as part of Fashion East, when Time Out was present and reported on Pugh, the hot new designer who had exploded on to the scene with a famous blow-up balloon creation. Fashion East will show on Tuesday at London Fashion Week (www.fashioneast.co.uk).

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    Lulu Kennedy at Lina Stores

    ‘This is definitely my favourite store in London. When you walk through the door it’s like being in Italy, though obviously the shopkeeper has got that lovely cockney accent but he’s still purely Italian, in that he’s very charming, lovely manners, very friendly. I love the food, obviously, but it’s also the whole atmosphere, the service and the friendliness – he has such longstanding relationships with his customers, you get that lovely sense of community. It’s like walking back in time slightly. I’ve been shopping here since I moved to London in the early 1990s. I like the pumpkin ravioli, the homemade sausages and the canolli. ‘Usually when I come in, I think: Oh, I’ll just go and buy some pasta, but I’ll walk out with bags full.  You always pick up cooking tips. I’d be really upset if they ever changed the shop. I love it just as it is.’
    Lina Stores Ltd, 18 Brewer St, W1F 0SH (7437 6482). Piccadilly tube. 7am-6.30pm Mon-Fri, 7am-5.30pm Sat. 

    Gareth Pugh loves…
    William Gee
    ‘That’s the shop we use most often for my work. It’s a Dalston institution. It’s like a haberdashery wholesaler. It’s one of these shops that hasn’t changed since the 1950s.’
    William Gee, 520-522 Kingsland Rd, E8 4AH (7254 2451/www.william gee.co.uk).

    Daphne Guinness loves…
    Kynance Laundry & Dry Cleaning
    ‘There’s a brilliant dry-cleaner I’ve been using called Kynance Laundry & Dry Cleaning. It is absolutely fabulous. It does it really, really delicately. It’s really difficult to get couture dry-cleaned.’
    Kynance Laundry & Dry Cleaning, 2-3 Kynance Place, SW7 4QS (7584 7846).

    Judy Blame Loves...
    A Child of The Jago, Shoreditch
    The hellraising fashion stylist ran away from rural Devon in the late 1970s and, like Jones, later became a regular at the Blitz club. In 1989 he started working as a stylist for i-D magazine and in the early 1990s worked with Neneh Cherry and Björk. He has recently been designing a jewellery line, which is sold at Dover Street Market, as well as creating show pieces for young British designers including Richard Nicholl, Giles Deacon, Noki and Gareth Pugh.

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    Judy Blame at A Child of the Jago

    ‘I’ve known the owners for ages: Joe Corre [Vivienne Westwood’s son and co-founder of Agent Provocateur] since he was about 14 and Barnz [the designer Simon Armitage, AKA Barnzley] for God knows how long. It’s a great shop, you never know what you are going to unearth. Look, I’ve got me own version of this [pearly king hat] and I’ve just knocked Paris out with it while I was at the Gareth Pugh menswear show. I just love Barnzley’s energy and Joe’s business savvy, and it’s just got a lot of character. There’s absolutely nothing high street about this shop. It’s very eclectic, like my wardrobe, which suits me down to the ground. It doesn’t say “Brick Lane vintage”, it says “glorious”. The first time I came in here I saw this amazing French linen shirt from the 1800s, hung up downstairs. But upstairs it’s very modern. Joe’s mum is putting her stuff upstairs [that’s Vivienne Westwood’s World’s End collection] and there’s Barnzley’s cashmere hooded tops, handmade in Scotland. I like the variety – you can come in here any time and Barnzley has put something bonkers up. I’ve used some of the chainmail jewellery and hats for shoots. Look at that weird machine thing: it looks like something Frankenstein might have owned. It’s quite bawdy in here too. Barnzley gave me this suit about 20 years ago; he designed the pistol print and got the tailor Mark Powell to make it. I still wear it to bits.’
    A Child of the Jago, 10 Great Eastern St, EC2A 3UT (7377 8694/www.child ofthejago.blogspot.com). Liverpool St tube/rail. 11am-7pm Mon-Sat.

    Matt Irwin, photographer, loves…
    The Widescreen Centre
    ‘My favourite shop is the Widescreen Centre. It’s one of the few places that develops Super8 film, analogue film. It’s really stick to its guns and it’s a bit of a hidden gem.’
    The Widescreen Centre, 47 Dorset St, W1U 7ND (7935 2580/www.widescreen-centre.co.uk).

    Penny Martin loves…
    The Clock Gallery, South Ealing
    Until a few months ago, Penny Martin, 36, was editor-in-chief of the UK’s most experimental fashion website www.showstudio.com, where she commissioned Gareth Pugh for projects. Now with a prestigious post as Rootstein Hopkins Chair of Fashion Imagery at the London College of Fashion, the professor divides her time between teaching and writing, as well as contributing to Showstudio. She is also working on an exhibition with Showstudio which will debut at Somerset House in September.

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    Penny Martin at The Clock Gallery

    ‘My husband and I have only lived around here for  a year. We came across the shop when we were having a look around the area on a Saturday shortly after we’d put the offer in on the house. We were just so excited to see that there was a subject-specific shop left in London. It had such a big space, a really lovely interior with a fantastic Edwardian cast-iron shop frontage.  When we moved in, we came back. We had a mantlepiece and nothing to fill it so we found a tin 1950s wind-up clock. It’s quite compulsive, you feel like you want to come back and buy a clock for every room and I probably will.‘The owner is very genteel; you can watch him and his colleague in the back mending watches – they have a great deal of expertise. They were the only men who were able to fix my husband’s watch having toured Hatton Garden to no avail.’
    The Clock Gallery, 58 St Mary’s Rd, W5 5EX (8579 3367). South Ealing tube. 10am-5.30pm Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri; 10am-1.30pm Sat.

    Dan Jones loves…
    Mysteries
    ‘My mum used to drag me in here as a kid and I’ve grown to love it. It’s probably the most uncool shop in the capital, but it does a roaring trade with hairy old hippies, reiki masters and self-help book lovers.
    Mysteries, 9-11 Monmouth St, WC2H 9DA (7240 3688).

    Mandi Lennard, PR, loves…
    World’s End
    ‘Vivienne Westwood at World’s End is an old-school Westwood shopping experience.
    It sells a lot of exclusive stuff her other stores don’t stock. There’s a huge treasure trove of her best accessories.’
    World’s End (430 King’s Road, SW10 0LR/7352 6551).

    Find more secret East End shops | Find more secret west London shops

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‘My husband and I have only lived around here for  a year. We came across the shop when we were having a look around the area on a Saturday shortly after we’d put the offer in on the house. We were just so excited to see that there was a subject-specific shop left in London. It had such a big space, a really lovely interior with a fantastic Edwardian cast-iron shop frontage.  When we moved in, we came back. We had a mantlepiece and nothing to fill it so we found a tin 1950s wind-up clock. It’s quite compulsive, you feel like you want to come back and buy a clock for every room and I probably will.‘The owner is very genteel; you can watch him and his colleague in the back mending watches – they have a great deal of expertise. They were the only men who were able to fix my husband’s watch having toured Hatton Garden to no avail.’ ‘My mum used to drag me in here as a kid and I’ve grown to love it. It’s probably the most uncool shop in the capital, but it does a roaring trade with hairy old hippies, reiki masters and self-help book lovers. ‘Vivienne Westwood at World’s End is an old-school Westwood shopping experience. It sells a lot of exclusive stuff her other stores don’t stock. There’s a huge treasure trove of her best accessories.’Find more secret East End shops | Find more secret west London shops

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1 comments
Phil Dirtbox
Phil Dirtbox

Phil says thanks mate for giving me the promised plug to Stephen Jones.