Barbican: the critics' verdict

0

Comments

Add +

  • Architecture | Art | Classical | Dance | Film | Theatre

    Features_Barbican film4.jpg
    Seating at the Barbican's cinema

    Film

    By Dave Calhoun

    The Barbican, along with the NFT, is our city’s leading cinema dedicated to the history and exploration of film beyond the easy catch of new releases. While it can’t compete on the same terms as its southern cousin – which is publicly funded and has access to international film archives – the Barbican plays to its strengths: rather than concentrate on comprehensive director-led seasons, its three cinemas instead tread a more varied path inspired by their home in a centre dedicated not only to film, but also all the other arts. That’s why we’ve lately seen film seasons such as ‘Shostakovich on Film’ and ‘John Adams on Film’, as well as explorations of how playwrights such as Beckett and Ibsen have influenced filmmakers. While exhibitions such as ‘Tropicália’ run in the gallery, you’ll find corresponding films in the cinemas.The sloping auditorium of the cinemas’ main screen is perfect for Q&As and encourages audience participation. I’ve seen some superb post-film interviews there; the one that sticks in the mind was with the great Senegalese filmmaker, Ousmane Sembène, who was boisterous and unforgiving of the audience’s less intelligent questions.

    Triumph

    Q&A with Ken Loach for the release of ‘The Wind that Shakes the Barley’ in June 2006.

    Disaster

    Hiding the two smaller cinemas, which can be impossible to find.
    Architecture
    | Art | Classical | Dance | Film | Theatre

  • Add your comment to this feature
  • Page:
    | 1 |  ...  | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 |

The Barbican, along with the NFT, is our city’s leading cinema dedicated to the history and exploration of film beyond the easy catch of new releases. While it can’t compete on the same terms as its southern cousin – which is publicly funded and has access to international film archives – the Barbican plays to its strengths: rather than concentrate on comprehensive director-led seasons, its three cinemas instead tread a more varied path inspired by their home in a centre dedicated not only to film, but also all the other arts. That’s why we’ve lately seen film seasons such as ‘Shostakovich on Film’ and ‘John Adams on Film’, as well as explorations of how playwrights such as Beckett and Ibsen have influenced filmmakers. While exhibitions such as ‘Tropicália’ run in the gallery, you’ll find corresponding films in the cinemas.The sloping auditorium of the cinemas’ main screen is perfect for Q&As and encourages audience participation. I’ve seen some superb post-film interviews there; the one that sticks in the mind was with the great Senegalese filmmaker, Ousmane Sembène, who was boisterous and unforgiving of the audience’s less intelligent questions. Q&A with Ken Loach for the release of ‘The Wind that Shakes the Barley’ in June 2006. Hiding the two smaller cinemas, which can be impossible to find.
Architecture
| Art | Classical | Dance | Film | Theatre

Users say

0 comments