Gareth Pugh's names to watch in London fashion

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    Alice Kirckpatrick

    Alice Kirkpatrick, 23, designer

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    ‘A breath of fresh air, Alice does everything with flawless style. She has a good eye for what’s right and what’s not – most of the time, at least! A recent graduate from the Central Saint Martins BA fashion course, she is definitely one to watch.’Alice Kirkpatrick is all smiles and shoulder pads. A womenswear graduate, for her final collection she imagined a tough, sci-fi heroine and dressed her in cubic puffball skirts with stiff Neoprene overcoats and dangerously pointy shoulders. ‘I’m influenced by politics and powerful women and liked the idea of this crazy woman-creature storming the city,’ she says.As a student Alice assisted Gareth Pugh but she now works full-time in fashion PR with a little styling on the side. ‘I’m trying to get some funding together and gain a bit more experience of the industry.’ She appeared in photographer Matt Irwin’s Armani Exchange-sponsored film in 2007 and is currently working on a project with jewellery designer Dominic Jones, looking at ways to incorporate fine metals into clothes. ‘There’s a really cool scene in London,’ says Alice. ‘Two years ago, when nu-rave happened, there was lots of colour and neon. Now everyone’s gone a bit dark. I guess a big influence on that is Gareth.’

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    Mark Fast

    Mark Fast, 28, designer

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    ‘Canadian-born Central Saint Martins graduate Mark creates short, sex-oozing dresses in microfine nylon thread which are second skins that leave little to the imagination.’ Skintight, sheer and studded with peepholes, Mark Fast’s cobweb-like dresses caught the eye of On|Off – an independent fashion exhibition bolstering the careers of young designers. Last season he was awarded a slot in On|Off’s group catwalk show and his craftsman-like approach to knitwear was a hit. This season, 28-year-old Mark has earned himself the coveted ‘New Gen’ award, the British Fashion Council’s catwalk sponsorship, supported by Topshop. ‘I sort of just discovered it – knitwear,’ says Mark. ‘I love the control you have over the fabric. You can integrate it into things that you just can’t do with other materials.’ The soft-spoken Canadian has lived in London for seven years and, after investing in a BA and MA, looks set to stay. ‘There are a risk-takers here in London, and that’s always great to see,’ says Mark. ‘To be part of the British fashion industry is really exciting, and I hope to be here for quite a while.’

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    Ellis Scott

    Ellis Scott, 24, photographer

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    ‘Ellis has been snapping away at dirty nightclubs for quite some years now, and with a fully functioning photography studio in his house, he’s had time to hone his skills behind the lens.’The career of 24-year-old fashion photographer Ellis Scott had a rather unfashionable beginning. ‘I worked for a year assisting advertising photographers, shooting things like the Dairylea Lunchables campaign. It was amazing! I’ve never assisted a fashion photographer, and I’m so glad I haven’t: compared to ad shoots, it can be so simplistic.’ Following his sojourn in advertising, Ellis studied at the London College of Fashion before becoming a photographer full-time. ‘I’ve had a few very lucky breaks,’ say Ellis, ‘and I managed to date the right girl at the right time, too: my girlfriend modelled for Gareth Pugh and I met him backstage at his show. He introduced me to [stylists] Nicola Formichetti and Katie Grand and the Dazed & Confused crew.’ ‘I was born into a creative family,’ Ellis continues, ‘and I’m dyslexic, so I was never going to be an investment banker. With photography it’s just one man and a camera. I love that romantic notion of ’60s and ’70s photographers, like Guy Bourdin wandering around Paris, shouting at models.’

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    Gary Card

    Gary Card, 27, set designer

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    ‘Regularly working with House of Holland on fashion-show sets, building huge snails out of old clothes for Topshop and filling Stella McCartney’s shop window with hundreds of footballs, Gary has moved onwards and upwards. Give the boy a roll of masking tape and he can make you anything.’Cary Card has created candy-coloured monster puppets for Uniqlo, lumpy totem poles for Lee Jeans and creepy headpieces for avant-garde fashion shoots. First and foremost a set designer, Gary also designs backdrops and props for editorial and advertising projects, shop-window displays and catwalk shows. ‘I make a lot of stuff out of reworked materials,’ explains Gary, ‘sometimes in a large studio space, but most of the time in my own home.’ Gary graduated in theatre design from Central Saint Martins in 2002 and has since signed to creative agency CLM, creating oddities for an impressive list of clients. ‘I also do a bit of print design and illustration,’ he adds, ‘and last year Gareth and I collaborated on a weird pop-up book project for Visionaire magazine.’ ‘There’s a definite energy in London that you just don’t get anywhere else,’ he says. ‘London embraces youth. I’ve lived here for ten years now, and I kind of forget. It’s a city that embraces new things.’

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    Matthew Josephs

    Matthew Josephs 21, stylist/designer

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    ‘A regular contributor to i-D magazine, Matthew knows a good thing when he sees it. Always well turned out, he can often be found howling outside Rick Owen’s soon-to-be-opened store off Mount Street.’Rotherham-born Matthew Josephs worked as an intern at i-D magazine aged 19. Two years later, he is one of its contributing stylists (and occasional model), with a penchant for dressing men in tight-fitting womenswear. Alongside shoots for i-D, Matthew is working on his graduate collection for his womenswear BA at Central Saint Martins. ‘My tutors at my college up north told me I wouldn’t get on to a Central Saint Martins womenswear course. I wanted to piss them off and applied for it – and I got in!’ So, no plans to return to Rotherham? ‘What’s not to like about London?’ says Matthew. ‘I could wear this down the street [Gareth Pugh top, rolled-up baggy suit trousers and high-heeled boots] and no one would care. That’s a really important thing for me. Londoners have seen everything.’

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    Tara Grant

    Tara Grant. 26, accessories

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    ‘Tara is one of those people you should never, ever go to a car boot sale with – she’d track down all the good stuff before you do. She also has a slight obsession with Debbie Harry.’‘London street style is brave,’ says Topshop accessories designer Tara Grant. ‘People like to try new things and test out new styles themselves. Londoners don’t need to be told something’s cool before they do it.’ Twenty-six-year-old Tara graduated from Central Saint Martins in 2004 after studying furniture and lighting as part of a product design course. She then worked her way into the fashion industry through a series of internships. As a member of Girlcore – an arty, all-female collective – Tara helps plan club nights in London and Moscow and doesn’t underestimate the effectiveness of group power. ‘It’s what’s unique about London: there are all these young creative people feeding off each other. It’s like a family.’

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4 comments
Natasha
Natasha

I don't know Matthew, but how can saying someone 'looks boring' be a valid comment? I think Matthew's styling for i-D is interesting and he has a good eye for detail. Not always to my taste but he'll get better as he gets more experience. Intheknow - did you really go to CSM? Perhaps you need to go back and learn how to spell.

intheknow
intheknow

yes matthews jospehs is borring and shallow having studied with him at csm. these people have never been spat on because they only hang out in the areas where there are similar people to them. Or people who understand what they are about. plus they are probably igonorant to the people around them to even care what people think about their dress sense in they are cery confident.

mary magdelena
mary magdelena

i visited london from germany 2 weeks ago and was expecting a crucible of creativity with regards to street fashion( that london used to be). i was very disappointed to generally see sweatpants and trainer brigade ,seems to be the dominant street fashion here, but without the exercise . also what is this guy matthew josephs on about i've been spat at in london for looking too creative friends also , although from his pic i guess hes pretty invisible to peeps, the guy looks real boring

fetishnista
fetishnista

it just go to show you fashion in london is dead and yes london is still so conservative dress in any unuasual way and you still get gawped at unlike the rest of the country its time the people above got real