North London v South London - Cultural highlights

0

Comments

Add +

Time Out's critics select their top five spots for arts, culture and entertainment on both sides of the river. But which comes out on top, North or South London? Let us know your favourite haunts – they might just swing the outcome one way or the other...

  • North London v South London - Cultural highlights

    Brick Lane © Nick Ballon

  • North London | South London

    Why North London rocks


    • Photo for Camden Arts Centre

      Camden Arts Centre

      Arkwright Rd, Hampstead, NW3 6DG

      Built in 1897, Camden Arts Centre was originally a library; the grade II listed building was transformed in the 1960s. Following a reburbishment, the centre re-opened to the public in 2004. The galleries are able to display a broad range of work including installation, film and video, light sensitive drawings and sculpture. Read more

  • Almeida Theatre

    Almeida St, Islington, N1 1TA

    Well groomed and with a rather chic new bar, the Almeida Theatre turns out thoughtfully crafted theatre for grown-ups. Under artistic director Michael Attenborough it has drawn top directors like Howard Davies and Richard Eyre, and premieres from the likes of Stephen Adly Guirgis. Variously housing reading rooms, a Victorian Music Hall and a Salvation Army Citadel, the Almeida Theatre has had a rich past. Read more

  • Bull & Last

    168 Highgate Rd, Kentish Town, NW5 1QS

    Forget the fair-to-middling cafés around Swains Lane – the south-eastern side of Hampstead Heath at last has a genuine destination for seriously good, yet informal, cooking. The own-made charcuterie is an impressive turn of rillettes and offally bits (duck liver parfait and more) and worth ordering to share – the fact is, all portion sizes are so huge that attempting a three-course meal here is almost futile. Read more

  • Brick Lane

    Brick Lane, Bethnal Green, E1 6QL

    A veritable treasure trove of some of the best vintage stuff London has to offer. Don't miss Cheshire Street for inspired homewares, and Dray Walk for designer menswear, the hip Rough Trade East shop (with secret in-store gigs) and Sunday's UpMarket for London's best up-and-coming designers (and tasty street food). Read more

  • Fabric

    77a Charterhouse St, Smithfield, EC1M 3HN

    Fabric is the club that most party people come to see in London, with good reason. Located in a former meatpacking warehouse, it's gained a well-deserved reputation as the capital's biggest and best club. Fabric's line-ups are legendary, with the world's most famous DJs regularly making appearances. But be warned – the queues are also legendary – blag your way on to the guestlist or buy tickets in advance unless you want a three-hour wait. Read more

North London | South London

Users say

3 comments
adam meek
adam meek

born and bread in north east london i really hate going south of the river so when i ended up with a girlfriend living in tooting i tried as much to get her to meet me in the middle but eventually she would drag me south... i must say that even when we did go to battersea and clapham the supposed developing areas i still would rather have been out in stokey or angel. there just feels like there is no history....

Gavin
Gavin

The suckiest thing about South London, particularly in the South East, is the really poor transport. Lack of freedom to roam around that area of London and still be able to make it home in time for bed means I won't be living in SE if I can help it.

rob davidson
rob davidson

Born in Notting Hill and emigrated to SW19 as soon as reason began to develop. Those peering over the buttresses of Battersea bridge should breach security and immerse themselves in the sophistication of the deep 'sarf'. Its a known fact that we have far more green and pleasant parkland than the scarred and parched patches of grass so often depicted in the cinema, poor old Primrose hill and South end green. A cornicopia of restaurants extend from Deptford to Dartford, Rotherhithe to Richmond. Culture is in abundance, so is eclectic architecture and folk still smile in the supermarket. Don your pith helmet and rucksack, trek south and explore the real London.