Movies

Find Los Angeles movie showtimes, read movie reviews, find theaters in your neighborhood and buy movie tickets here. Plus, browse the top film events in LA.

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Exclusive: Rooftop Film Club announces more screenings

Rooftop Film Club, LA's newest outdoor screening series, has just announced some great films through the month of October.

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Movies

All of LA's outdoor movies in one calendar

Summer is here! Let outdoor screening season begin!

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Movies

Film events this week: critics' picks

Whether you prefer drive-ins, director Q&As or outdoor screenings, we've got you covered.

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15 epic surf movies

We count down the best, most gnar-shredding surf films of all time

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The best upcoming movie releases

Movies in theaters: Critics' picks

Movies

Mistress America

Noah Baumbach’s films are consumed with the terror of becoming, his characters often clinging to the protective embrace of college like a life preserver in shark-infested waters. In the brilliant Mistress America, which begins on the first day of freshman year as Tracy (Lola Kirke) moves into her Barnard dorm, academia is a place where kids are so worried about what they should become that they hardly have time to be themselves. Like Frances Ha on Adderall, Mistress America finds Baumbach working with a manic screwball energy that has more in common with Preston Sturges or Howard Hawks than it does any of his previous films. Things begin with a running start as Tracy crushes on the first boy she meets (Matthew Shear) and pines for acceptance to a pompous literary society, but it’s not until Brooke (Greta Gerwig) enters the picture that the film takes flight. Tracy’s mom is due to marry Brooke’s dad, and so the two girls are forced into a manufactured but mutually beneficial sisterhood.  They’re perfect foils: Tracy is paralyzed by the choices offered by her new life in the big city, and Brooke—a restauranteur-designer-musician–SoulCycle instructor who’s sustained by the sheer inertia of her schemes—has seemingly made all of those choices at once. The siblings-to-be get into a whirlwind of misadventure, and Tracy starts writing a story about Brooke (called “Mistress America”). Eventually the film drops its anchor at a Connecticut mansion, setting the stage for one of the gre

Time Out says
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Ricki and the Flash

From Jonathan Demme, a director with an impossibly rich résumé of female empowerment (Married to the Mob), musical euphoria (Stop Making Sense) and failed American dreams (Melvin and Howard), comes a movie that lets him do everything he’s terrific at. Throw in Demme’s The Silence of the Lambs, too, as scruffy bar-band front woman Ricki Randazzo (Meryl Streep) tears into Tom Petty’s jangly “American Girl” with a dead-eyed survivor’s stare. Sarcastic, bitter and chatty, Ricki barely holds onto her corporate grocery checkout job during the daytime, but those liabilities become assets at night, when her local fans howl appreciatively through the hits. Demme’s never been a hater, and even as Meryl Streep flings off weird sparks to her grizzled band mates the Flash, there’s an underlying realness to her that defies glibness. This zesty, defiantly awkward shambles of a film might be called a domestic drama, as it plucks its penniless main character from her beer-soaked California stage and sends her to the Midwest to deal with her wealthy ex-husband (Kevin Kline, playing off Streep as tenderly as in Sophie’s Choice) and their suicidal adult daughter (Mamie Gummer, Streep's real-life progeny), a victim of Ricki’s long-ago abandonment. Tough stares and words await, very much of a piece with screenwriter Diablo Cody’s earlier credits, especially the underrated Young Adult, to which this feels a similarly arrested cousin. But that hardly does justice to a movie that gives Streep her

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

The End of the Tour

Like the black monolith in 2001, late novelist David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest casts a long shadow over the chatty, sharply observed The End of the Tour. The door-stopping 1996 book inspires several running gags: It's more than a thousand pages long, so it must be brilliant. It weighs in at over three pounds and stacks dangerously high. It makes women swoon, alienating them from their jealous writer boyfriends. Paradoxically, though, director James Ponsoldt's brainy comedy is built on the slenderest of spines—an extended interview made up of weaves and dodges—yet still manages to contain a blizzard of heartbreaking insights into loneliness, fame and ambition. Rolling Stone's David Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg) spent five days with the quirky Wallace (Jason Segel), recording their back-and-forth over car rides, late-night junk-food feasts and speaking engagements. That real-life conversation resulted in Lipsky's 2010 tragedy-tinged memoir Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself, but in the hands of Pulitzer-winning adapting screenwriter Donald Margulies, it becomes a spiky cinematic two-hander that rewards those who lean in. Eisenberg is fully within his neurotic element as Lipsky, skulking through NYC's literary hang KGB Bar, lunging at his doubtful editor for the Wallace gig and arriving in the author's snowy Illinois looking like a wet cat. Ponsoldt structures the film out of Lipsky's lingering reaction shots and you can see a riot of emotions on Eisenberg's face

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

The Diary of a Teenage Girl

In the unofficial book of Hollywood double standards, only teenage boys are allowed to fumble heroically into the wilds of sex. Most girls are either virginally waiting for Mr. Right or “slutty” supporting characters. So yay for indie drama The Diary of a Teenage Girl, which breaks the rules with Lena Dunham levels of brutal honesty (and humor). It’s the story of precocious 15-year-old Minnie (British actor Bel Powley, terrific), growing up in 1970s San Francisco. Her hippie mom (Kristen Wiig), unwilling to set boundaries, lets her daughter join in her boozy, coke-fueled parties. Dangerously bright and curious, Minnie slips into a sexual relationship with her mother’s easygoing boyfriend, Monroe, played by Alexander Skarsgård (who makes his character likable but never lets you forget that he’s one weak douche bag). At 35, Monroe might actually be less mature than Minnie is.  It’s a squirm-inducing idea to build a plot around, but to the movie’s credit, the sex is dealt with incredibly sensitively, always with a female perspective in mind. Directed by first-timer Marielle Heller, Diary is based on the acclaimed hybrid novel by Phoebe Gloeckner that mixes words with comic strips, as does the film. Minnie is trying to work out what kind of woman she wants to be, constructing herself out of drugs, Iggy Pop and random hookups. I can’t think of another film that nails being a 15-year-old girl, when you sometimes wish the ground would swallow you whole, yet also when you feel mor

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

The Night of the Shooting Stars

For Italian filmmaking brothers Paolo and Vittorio Taviani, the cinema has always been linked to their childhood experiences during WWII—the story goes that they wandered into a screening of Roberto Rossellini’s Paisan shortly after the fighting stopped and were thunderstruck by how it made sense of their own experiences. With 1982’s beautifully bittersweet The Night of Shooting Stars, the subject of an immaculate new restoration, the Tavianis were able to pay it forward. Framed as a bedtime story that a mother is telling her child, their film reanimates a bloody historical footnote through the eyes of six-year-old Cecilia (Micol Guidelli), someone young enough to find something wonderfully exciting about the madness of war. Set in and around the picturesque Italian town of San Marino during the twilight of its occupation, the Taviani’s episodic tragicomedy begins with a gaggle of citizens being told that the Germans have mined their houses, and that their only recourse is to take shelter in the local cathedral. In reality it was a trap, but the film graciously rewrites the past and allows a rabble of eccentric characters to escape the carnage—an old man named Galvano (Omero Antonutti) is neither trusting nor patient enough to wait for salvation, and so he leads those willing to follow him toward the dangerous hills beyond their home.  A kaleidoscope of horrors that never strays far from a sense of childlike mischief, The Night of the Shooting Stars bridges the gap between

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movies

Shaun the Sheep Movie

Only Aardman Animations—the British creators of Wallace & Gromit and other lovable, moldable claymation characters—could find an irresistible movie to be made about the story of an amnesiac farmer and his flock at loose in the big city. Much of the beauty of this big-hearted, stop-motion caper (a spin-off of an insanely successful BBC kids series) is the entire absence of decipherable language. Instead imagine grunts, mumbles, bleats and screams as Shaun the Sheep tries to engineer a day off from Mossy Bottom Farm but causes his bewildered owner to bang his head and wander off into the unnamed metropolis (which looks a lot like England’s Bristol, where Aardman has its HQ).  Amid the chaos, it’s sometimes hard to work out exactly which sheep is Shaun, but that doesn’t matter when there are great slapstick scenes in a hospital, a hair salon, a fancy restaurant and an ominous animal pound. Maybe an hour would have been enough, yet even the slower patches have charm to burn.

Time Out says
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Movie-going in LA

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The 11 best movie theaters in Los Angeles

Movie theaters are a dime a dozen here in LA, but these eleven spectacular cinemas are a reel above the rest.

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Movies

Best open-air places to watch movies in LA

Love outdoor movies? Enjoy summer nights with this guide to the best places to watch films under the stars.

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Time Out film lists

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50 films that best capture the essence of LA

The world knows Los Angeles better than it thinks.

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The most romantic movies of all time

Prepare to swoon at our loveliest of lists, the 50 most romantic films of all time.

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The best and worst Disney movies

From Snow White to Frozen, we explore the brilliant best and woeful worst of Disney animated films.

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50 great documentaries

As long as there is fantasy in film, audiences will also yearn for the truth—or something close to it.

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The top 50 sports films of all time

Ahh, sports movies. Victory, defeat, comebacks and a whole lot of ass slapping.

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