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Sneak peek at the proposed QueensWay (slide show)

Queens has a vision for its own version of the High Line, and its name is QueensWay. Check out the amazing renderings of the 3.5-mile railroad project, spanning Rego Park to Ozone Park.

  • Rendering: dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

    QueensWay rendering

  • dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

    Rendering of the QueensWay

  • Rendering: dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

    Rendering of the QueensWay

  • Rendering: dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

    QueensWay rendering

  • dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

    Rendering of the QueensWay

  • dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

    Rendering of the QueensWay

Rendering: dland studio Architecture + Landscape Architecture

QueensWay rendering


To us, Queens is like that racehorse that keeps up with the pack but holds back until the timing's right, then shoots ahead to win, to the astonishment of the onlookers. We love the expanded and completely revamped Queens Museum, the curiosity-inspiring New York Hall of Science, MoMA PS1, the magical Museum of the Moving Image, the Noguchi Museum, Forest Park—c'mom: Queens rocks! And now another great addition to the city's cultural and recreational landscape has been proposed: QueensWay, a 3.5-mile, High Line–inspired park along an obsolete railroad track that begins in Rego Park and extends all the way to Ozone Park.

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The rail, which originally served the LIRR's Rockaway Beach Branch (RBB), was abandonned more than 50 years ago due to low ridership, and the idea of community group Friends of the QueensWay—wait, does that sound a little familiar?—is to turn it into a "cultural greenway and linear park," according to press liason Maggie McKeon. The feasibility and planning project has held two rounds of idea-generating public workshops (the latest took place Wednesday, when many of the above renderings were presented for the first time) that have brought up such issues as how the QueensWay can connect kids to nature, ways it can support adjacent play spaces in neighborhoods the track runs through, whether it can be turned into a safe transportation alternative to dangerous Woodhaven Boulevard, and a number of safety and privacy concerns.

In June the feasibility study team will present its final report, which will include a blueprint for how to turn the idea-with-a-precedent into a reality. Until then: Click through our slide show of renderings, and prepare yourself for another must-visit attraction in Queens.




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