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Children's Museum exec charged in child porn case

I'm a huge Law & Order: SVU fan, but when those TV tales become reality, it makes my skin crawl. Such was the case reported in today's Washington Post, which alleged that Robert A. Singer, a National Children's Museum senior executive, had been charged with five counts of distributing child pornography over the Internet. The 49-year-old chief operating officer (and father of two!) was suspended from his job and barred from the museum. "According to a complaint filed in Manhattan federal court, Singer sent images of naked children, some in sexual acts with adults, five times in August to a New York City police detective posing both as a mother and her 12-year-old daughter," The Post reports. "He struck up the correspondence through an AOL chat room called Cuties, known for exchanges of pornography, the complaint alleges." After searching Singer's AOL account, police found he had sent about 80 images of child porn from July to September, including the 18 images sent to the NYPD undercover officer. He could face a maximum of 20 years in prison on one count and 40 years on each of the other four counts. The museum was "stunned" to learn of Singer's extracurricular activities, and naturally, and a neighbor interviewed said he and his wife were "perfectly nice people." Not that it makes any of this any better, but Singer supposedly did not work with children during his four years on the job. Then again, the museum has been closed since 2004 and is scheduled to reopen in 2012. What's your reaction to this story? Should Singer get the max? Did he deserve to lose his job? Do children's museums need stricter background checks? Talk back below (and stay tuned for this headline to be played out on a L&O:SVU episode in the future).

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