New York art 2012: Fall’s best art exhibitions

The New York art scene bursts back to life with major new shows featuring the works of Picasso and the influence of the Pope of Pop Art, Andy Warhol.

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Photograph: © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Check out fall’s highlights from the New York art scene. The Met, the New Museum, MoMA, the Whitney and the Guggenheim mount exhibitions displaying everything from the dynamic works that came out of postwar Japan to Picasso’s black-and-white pieces.


RECOMMENDED: Complete guide to Fall in New York


“Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years”

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

The Pope of Pop’s enormous impact on contemporary art is examined in this show, which brings together works by Warhol with those of 60 other artists he influenced. Organized into themes such as “Daily News: From Banality to Disaster” and “Portraiture: Celebrity and Power,” the survey features just about every contemporary art heavyweight you can think of: Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons and Cindy Sherman (below) are among the names topping the list. It’s a postmodern art blowout.

  1. The Metropolitan Museum of Art 1000 Fifth Ave, at 82nd St
  2. Until Sun Dec 30
More info

“Rosemarie Trockel: A Cosmos”

  • Price band: 2/4
  • Critics choice

This well-regarded German artist first came to the attention of New York’s art world in the mid- to late 1980s. It was around the time that a number of Americans—such as Robert Gober, Jeff Koons and Ashley Bickerton—began to invest sculptural objects with meanings that depended, to varying degrees, on associations with mass-produced consumer items, as well as the conventions of 1960s and ’70s Minimalism. Trockel did something similar with, for example, reductivist cubes adorned with kitchen range-top elements and factory-produced knitwear featuring the Playboy logo repeated in patterns. Her interests, however, have been far more encyclopedic than those of her American counterparts, touching upon philosophy, theology and natural science. This four-decade survey is cocurated by the artist herself as a sort of self-portrait; it includes items that have influenced her, such as 19th-century glass sculptures of sea creatures.

  1. New Museum of Contemporary Art 235 Bowery, at Prince St
  2. Sun Jan 26
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“Tokyo 1955–1970”

  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

MoMA revisits a dynamic interval in Japanese postwar art, coinciding with the country’s recovery from the devastation of World War II and its transformation into a global economic superpower. Some 300 works in a variety of media—painting, sculpture, photography, drawings and graphic design, as well as documentary film—tell the tale of this fascinating chapter in art history.

  1. Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) 11 W 53rd St, between Fifth and Sixth Aves
  2. Mon Feb 25
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"Picasso Black and White"

  • Price band: 3/4
  • Critics choice

As in every other category of art, Picasso dominated when it came to creating works in black and white. This show, which spans almost the entirety of his career (from 1904 to 1971), doesn’t include Guernica, but it does feature 118  works on loan from museum, private, and public collections across Europe and the United States—including numerous works from the Picasso family. Don’t miss this survey of the artist’s lifelong exploration of the unlimited possibilities to be found in a limited palette.

  1. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 1071 Fifth Ave, at 89th St
  2. Wed Jan 29
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"Richard Artschwager!"

  • Critics choice

For more than 40 years, Richard Artschwager has been creating a brilliantly eccentric mélange of Pop Art, Minimalism and Conceptual Art, moving among media such as sculpture, installation and drawing, while walking his own peculiar tightrope between high and low culture. His subjects are common items—furniture, fried eggs, building facades, exclamation points—rendered with or on such off-the-shelf materials as Formica and Celotex panels (the stuff that goes into modular ceilings). The results might be called suburban surreal, or maybe folk art on postindustrial steroids. This full-scale career retrospective of 150 works should be a highlight of the fall.

  1. Whitney Museum of American Art 945 Madison Ave, at 75th St
  2. Sun Feb 3
More info

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