The Met’s latest rooftop installation opens, featuring glass, grass and lawn chairs

Artist Dan Graham and Swiss landscape architect Gunther Vogt create a verdant oasis high above Central Park

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  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

  • Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

    Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

Photograph: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Copyright 2014

Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout (2014)

Just in time for nice weather, the Metropolitan Museum has opened the latest of its rooftop commissions, which will be on view through November 2. This year’s piece is a collaboration between artist Dan Graham and Swiss landscape architect Gunther Vogt. Graham, a pioneer of video and Conceptual Art, has spent the past 30 years or so creating elegant pavilions of glass and steel (and sometimes mirrors) in rural and urban outdoor settings. Similar to so-called architectural follies that grace formal gardens, these structures are meant to explore the relationship between the individual and public space. Graham’s latest piece, titled Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout, is an undulating glass wall sandwiched between vine-covered trestles atop a slab of pavers. And, in an echo of Central Park below, Vogt has covered the roof around the work with a carpet of grass. Lawn chairs are scattered about, allowing you to kick back for a while and contemplate the surrounding skyline in seated comfort—a long as somebody else isn't hogging them.


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