The top exhibitors at Frieze New York

Time Out editors from around the world offer their picks for ten essential galleries at the fair.

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  • Photograph: Courtesy Galeria Vermelho

    Galeria Vermelho, São Paulo
    One of the most consistently interesting galleries in São Paulo, ten-year-old Galeria Vermelho sits at the top of imposing Avenida Paulista, behind a blank facade that the gallery sometimes uses as a canvas. Inside, in spaces designed by the architect Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the gallery earns its reputation for championing emerging artists, investing considerable care and effort into their careers. For Frieze New York, Vermelho looks back to the 1970s with a selection of vintage works by Carmela Gross, while also presenting the gallery’s 1970s/1980s-born generation of artists, including rising stars Jonathas de Andrade and Cinthia Marcelle. Don’t miss the magnificent pictures by Cia de Foto, a collective of art photographers and image processors who climbed aboard a “trio elétrico” Carnival float in Salvador, the heart of African Brazil, to register the faces in the crowd looking up in apparent supplication, wonder and bliss.—Claire Rigby, editor, Time Out São Paulo

  • Photograph: Courtesy Annet Gelink Gallery

    Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam
    Since opening her gallery in 2000, Annet Gelink has become one of the most powerful voices in contemporary Dutch art, thanks to her sharp eye for surprising, boundary-pushing talent. Her stable of hot young international up-and-comers—many plucked from Amsterdam’s prestigious Rijksakademie art residency program—includes David Maljkovic, Barbara Visser and Carlos Amorales. At Frieze New York, keep a lookout for British mixed-media artist Ryan Gander’s neon and curtain piece; Spanish Minimalist-Conceptualist Wilfredo Prieto’s rock and mirror; and Japanese artist Meiro Koizumi’s video installation with drawings, antique desk and letter.—Nina Siegal, editor, Time Out Amsterdam


  • Photograph: Courtesy Nogueras Blanchard

    Nogueras Blanchard, Barcelona
    People with an appetite for contemporary art know to stop in at the Nogueras Blanchard gallery, one of the Barcelona scene’s most familiar establishments. Since opening in 2004, it’s become a go-to destination for anyone serious about emerging artists. Risk-takers enjoy a warm welcome here, and that includes gallerygoers: If you feel like singing the anarchist hymn “Negres Tempestes” (“black storms”) while beholding Ester Partegàs’s equally riotous paintings and sculpture, no problem. If you want to lie down on the couch in Leandro Erlich’s reconstruction of a psychoanalyst’s office, feel free. Japanese artist Shimabuku became a gallery favorite some years ago with his video installation Fish & Chips, and has since held openings featuring fish tanks filled with tomatoes, pumpkins and custard apples—products that refer to national and regional identity. Surprised? Well, that’s the idea.—Josep Lambies, Art editor, Time Out Barcelona

  • Photograph: Courtesy the artist

    Long March Space, Beijing
    Established by curator Lu Jie in 2002, Long March Space was one of the earliest establishments to open in 798, Beijing’s market-driven and happening art district. It’s supported and collaborated on projects with artists, curators and academics, its representatives having traversed Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh trail and gone on overnight trains across China and beyond to bring art to the Chinese people—and into the international sphere. At Frieze New York, Long March arrives with a one-man show by the young emerging artist Huang Ran. On view are silk screens on paper, a sculpture and a 20-minute video, Disruptive Desires, Tranquility and the Loss of Lucidity (2012). A tale of teenage romance in which the tension between two horny but innocent protagonists builds to a breaking point, the film is sentimental, sweet, and yet also somehow edgy and nonconformist. The beauty considered in the clumsy sexual relationship between boy and girl is quite different from the artist’s fastidiously composed silk screens, featuring classically inspired portraits that look like they could have come out of an Edwardian medical text. Faces and busts are tied, sliced, measured and pulled at by unidentified hands, but instead of muscle under the areas of peeled-back flesh, we see a vibrant blue. The carefully perfected and analyzed construction of these pieces evokes dark references to beauty, plastic surgery and Nazi eugenics. Huang’s show is sure to be popular with watchers of China’s art scene, while providing a shot of titillation for many other viewers.—Clare Pennington, Art editor, Time Out Beijing

  • Photograph: Courtesy Gallery Sfeir-Semler; Beirut/Hamburg

    Galerie Sfeir-Semler, Beirut
    Galerie Sfeir-Semler occupies a vast, high-ceilinged space near Beirut’s slaughterhouses in the district of Quarantina. Since 2005, the gallery has been one of the city’s preeminent spaces for contemporary art, introducing the Middle East to the West and vice versa. It’s demonstrated a knack for exhibiting lesser-known yet seminal figures, like the prolific Emirati artist Hassan Sharif. And it’s often the first stop for prominent Middle Eastern artists working abroad who are looking to exhibit in the region. Over the years, Sfeir-Semler has coupled with Bidoun magazine on the exhibition “NOISE,” and with Ashkal Alwan, the Lebanese Association for Plastic Arts, on its roughly biannual “Home Works” series of multidisciplinary forums on art and culture. Sfeir-Semler’s past solo shows have included such figures as Walid Raad (his first showing in his home country), Akram Zaatari, and the artist and writer Etel Adnan, as well as the Moroccan, Paris-born artist Yto Barrada. Works from each are on exhibit at Frieze New York, alongside pieces from Mounira Al Solh and the Egyptian artist Wael Shawky. All in all, the Randalls Island fair offers another opportunity for Sfeir-Semler to promote the best art from the Middle East.—Eliot Stempf, Art editor, Time Out Beirut

  • Photograph: Benoit Pailley

    Rodeo Gallery, Istanbul
    One of the most exciting art spaces in Istanbul, the proudly nontraditional Rodeo is setting up shop at Frieze New York with works by three gallery artists: Emre Hüner (born in Istanbul, lives and works in Amsterdam and Berlin); Iman Issa (born in Egypt, lives and works in New York); and Christodoulos Panayiotou (born in Cyprus, lives and works in Paris and Cyprus). Panayiotou’s contribution comes via a solo exhibition at the Contemporary Art Museum in St Louis (CAM): One Thousand and One Days is a sculpture of a rolled red carpet of the sort found in awards ceremonies, one of many he presented at CAM alongside photos found in the archives of the Republic of Cyprus’s Press and Information Office. Issa has been focusing on the idea of city monuments and how they function. (Her series “Material” was recently exhibited in “The Ungovernables” at the New Museum.) Proposal for an Iraq War Memorial is a 2007 video she did in response to the Iraq War, which will be presented in the U.S. for the first time at Frieze New York. Meanwhile, Hüner, whose oeuvre has centered on utopian societies and the relation of man to nature, is unveiling a new set of drawings of rocks and natural formations mesmerizingly done in pencil.—Merve Arkunlar, Art editor, Time Out Istanbul

  • Photograph: Courtesy Seventeen Gallery; London

    Seventeen Gallery, London
    Located in East London (on the fringe of Dalston’s main drag of rough-and-ready but übercool bars and clubs) is the good ship Seventeen Gallery. It’s helmed by hardworking skipper Dave Hoyland, who operates an established commercial space that maintains an open and experimental feel. The gallery hosts solo and group exhibitions by emerging, established and sometimes overlooked artists, groups and collectives, with the key to its ongoing success being its willingness to take risks. Even if you don’t know the artists, you know that they’re probably worth checking out—as the always busy openings attest. The more-established names associated with Seventeen include David Blandy, Susan Collis and Graham Dolphin, while others who have worked with the gallery include Cut Up, Bill Drummond, New Display Strategies and Forcefield. In addition to the main gallery space, Seventeen also hosts a program of shows in its cellarlike basement, providing a valuable platform for young curators to show audiences something new.—Helen Sumpter, deputy visual arts editor, Time Out London

  • Photograph: Courtesy the artist and kurimanzutto

    Kurimanzutto, Mexico City
    Lucas Vernon, Art editor, Time Out Mexico City: What artists are you bringing to the Frieze New York?
    José Kuri and Monica Manzutto, cofounders, Kurimanzutto: We’re presenting a solo show by Mexican artist Abraham Cruzvillegas.

    Can you tell us about the works you’re showing?
    A sculpture and some drawings. The work is based on a project called Autoconstrucción (“self-construction”). The community where the artist grew up came together little by little, with migrants arriving in Mexico City from different parts of the country, establishing themselves on properties that didn’t belong to anyone. They slowly built houses with found materials. Eventually, social, political and other types of problems began to arise. Cruzvillegas reflects this reality in his work.

    What differentiates your gallery from others—at Frieze New York as well as in Mexico?
    We’ve worked with the same group of artists since the gallery started, and everything’s based around the relationship and closeness we have with them.

    Why are you the only Mexican gallery at Frieze?
    We’ve been collaborating and participating with Frieze in London for a long time. We had no idea if other Mexican galleries were invited or not.

    How are New York collectors responding to contemporary Mexican art?
    We have many clients in NYC that have shown a great amount of interest in our artists, including private and public collections.

    What have been some of Kurimanzutto’s most important New York moments previous to Frieze New York?
    Gabriel Orozco’s MoMA retrospective, Adrián Villar Rojas’s work at the New Museum Triennial and Dr. Lakra at the Drawing Center, to name just a few.

  • Photograph: Courtesy Galerie Perrotin; Paris

    Galerie Perrotin, Paris
    Emmanuel Perrotin has a flair for commercial success. In fact, if there ever were such a thing as a personal empire of contemporary art in Paris, it would most likely reside in his multistory gallery on the Rue de Turenne, amid the Marais district’s maze of trendy cobbled streets. As a young dealer, Perrotin organized Damien Hirst’s first ever solo show, in 1991, and then gained increasing notoriety over the years by exhibiting artists such as Maurizio Cattelan and Takashi Murakami at the onset of their careers. Nowadays, billionaire collectors like François Pinault queue at his doorstep to stock up on works by best-sellers such as Piotr Uklanski, Johan Creten and radical Austrian collective Gelitin, which creates trashy absurdities out of toilet paper, Play-Doh and scatological dribble (in the literal sense). On the flip side, Perrotin’s good fortune has propelled him from the cutting edge to the mainstream. Not only does he now represent a stable of major international art stars, most of the local artists he shows also rank at the top of the French market, like Tatiana Trouvé, Xavier Veilhan and Sophie Calle. But don’t let the fame and flashiness put you off: Perrotin still has an eye for quirky young creators, like French duo Kolkoz or Danish video artist Jesper Just, whose whimsical films might just send you flying to unsuspected realms of ethereality.—Tania Brimson, Art editor, Time Out Paris

  • Photograph: Courtesy A Gentil Carioca; Rio De Janeiro

    A Gentil Carioca, Rio De Janeiro
    With two bases in very different corners of Rio de Janeiro, A Gentil Carioca is one of the city’s more adventurous and modern galleries. It’s run by the artists Laura Lima, Márcio Botner and Ernesto Neto, from a tranquil HQ that overlooks the otherwise hectic SAARA market in Rio’s Centro. The focus is set firmly on supporting new and established contemporary talent, and so it is with the four artists representing the gallery at Frieze New York: Renata Lucas brings some reassuringly geometric shapes in the form of the “QuadroQuadro” series, utilizing wood, paper and mirrors. Thiago Rocha Pitta’s works employ varied media, from fabric-based installation and watercolor to salt crystals. Jarbas Lopes uses elastic rope in simple, arresting patterns. Completing the quartet is Maria Nepomuceno, who brings her dark and richly textured photography.—Doug Gray, editor, Time Out Rio de Janeiro

Photograph: Courtesy Galeria Vermelho

Galeria Vermelho, São Paulo
One of the most consistently interesting galleries in São Paulo, ten-year-old Galeria Vermelho sits at the top of imposing Avenida Paulista, behind a blank facade that the gallery sometimes uses as a canvas. Inside, in spaces designed by the architect Paulo Mendes da Rocha, the gallery earns its reputation for championing emerging artists, investing considerable care and effort into their careers. For Frieze New York, Vermelho looks back to the 1970s with a selection of vintage works by Carmela Gross, while also presenting the gallery’s 1970s/1980s-born generation of artists, including rising stars Jonathas de Andrade and Cinthia Marcelle. Don’t miss the magnificent pictures by Cia de Foto, a collective of art photographers and image processors who climbed aboard a “trio elétrico” Carnival float in Salvador, the heart of African Brazil, to register the faces in the crowd looking up in apparent supplication, wonder and bliss.—Claire Rigby, editor, Time Out São Paulo


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